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Topic: Constance Baker Motley


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In the News (Mon 22 Apr 19)

  
  Guardian Unlimited | Obituaries | Constance Baker Motley
Constance Baker Motley, who has died aged 84, was the first African-American woman to become a US federal judge and also the first fl woman to be elected to the New York state senate.
Motley was a link between the group of African-American lawyers of an earlier generation, including Marshall, James Nabrit and A Leon Higginbotham, who planned the legal attack on racial segregation in the 1950s, and the civil rights movement of the 1960s, when she was chief counsel for the NAACP legal and defence fund.
Constance Baker, as she was born, did not exactly come from an academic background, though she grew up in a university town.
www.guardian.co.uk /obituaries/story/0,3604,1582548,00.html   (1000 words)

  
 Constance Baker Motley - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Motley was successful in nine of the ten cases she argued before the Supreme Court.
Motley died of congestive heart failure on September 28, 2005 at NYU Downtown Hospital in New York City.
Hodgson, Godfrey, "Constance Baker Motley", The Guardian, Oct. 1, 2005.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Constance_Baker_Motley   (559 words)

  
 CWHF-Constance Baker Motley
Constance Baker Motley was born and raised in New Haven where her father worked as chef for a Yale University fraternity.
In 1964 Motley became the first Black woman elected to the New York State Senate and in 1965 she became the first woman elected to be president of the borough of Manhattan.
Constance Baker Motley is the author of dozens of articles on legal and civil rights issues, including several personal tributes to Thurgood Marshall.
www.cwhf.org /hall/motley/motley.htm   (376 words)

  
 Constance Baker Motley; civil rights lawyer became federal judge | The San Diego Union-Tribune
Constance Baker Motley, a civil rights lawyer who fought nearly every important civil rights case for two decades, winning the desegregation of schools, buses and lunch counters, and then became the first fl woman to serve as a federal judge, died Wednesday in Manhattan.
Judge Motley was at the center of the firestorm that raged through America's South in the two decades after World War II, as fls and their white allies pressed to end the segregation that had gripped the region since Reconstruction.
Constance Baker was born Sept. 14, 1921, in New Haven, Conn., the ninth of 12 children.
www.signonsandiego.com /uniontrib/20051002/news_mz1j2motley.html   (1043 words)

  
 BlackNews.com - Civil Rights Lawyer Constance Baker Motley Dies
Motley also broke barriers herself: She was the first fl woman appointed to the federal bench, as well the first one elected to the New York state Senate.
Motley and the Legal Defense and Education Fund, committed to a careful strategy of dismantling segregation through the courts, were amazed by the emergence of more militant tactics such as lunch-counter sit-ins, but she came to believe that litigation was not the only road to equality.
Motley is survived by her husband and son, three sisters and a brother.
www.blacknews.com /pr/motley101.html   (838 words)

  
 USATODAY.com - Federal judge, civil rights lawyer Constance Baker Motley dies at 84   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Motley was born in New Haven, Conn., the ninth of 12 children.
Motley earned a degree in economics in 1943 from New York University, and three years later, got her law degree from Columbia Law School.
At the heart of much of it was Motley, from a case in Little Rock, in 1957 that led President Eisenhower to call in federal troops to protect nine fl high school students to leading the legal charge to win James Meredith's entry into the University of Mississippi in 1962.
www.usatoday.com /news/nation/2005-09-28-motley-obit_x.htm   (783 words)

  
 Tribute: Constance Baker Motley '46
When Judge Motley became Chief Judge on June 1, 1982, she was the first woman and the first African-American woman to serve as such for the Southern District of New York, the largest federal trial bench in the country.
Motley joined the legal staff of the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Inc. when she was a senior at Columbia University School of Law.
In February of 1965, Judge Motley was elected by the Manhattan members of the New York City Council to fill a one-year vacancy in the office of President of the Borough of Manhattan, and thus became the first woman to serve in that office, and as a member of New York City's Board of Estimate.
www.law.columbia.edu /media_inquiries/news_events/2005/september/motley   (847 words)

  
 The My Hero Project - Constance MotleyMotley_HSC_CT_06
Constance Baker Motley was born on September 14, 1921, in New Haven, Connecticut.
Constance Baker Motley became the first African-American woman to serve for the Southern District of New York, the largest federal trial bench in the country.
Constance Baker Motley has shown me that there are no low races and that anybody who sets their mind to it can achieve wonderful things in their life - and maybe, just maybe, if they fight hard enough, they can change the world.
www.myhero.com /myhero/heroprint.asp?hero=Motley_HSC_CT_06   (509 words)

  
 CLIPI Blog » Blog Archive » Constance Baker Motley, Civil Rights Trailblazer, Dies at 84
Constance Baker Motley, a civil rights lawyer who fought nearly every important civil rights case for two decades and then became the first fl woman to serve as a federal judge, died yesterday at NYU Downtown Hospital in Manhattan.
Judge Motley was the first fl woman to serve in the New York State Senate, as well as the first woman to be Manhattan borough president, a position that guaranteed her a voice in running the entire city under an earlier system of local government called the Board of Estimate.
Constance Baker was born on Sept. 14, 1921, in New Haven, the ninth of 12 children.
www.clipi.org /blog/index.php?p=177   (1474 words)

  
 Judge Constance Baker Motley Dead at 84 - US Department of State   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Motley was a young attorney for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored people in the 1950s when she worked on the Brown v.
Constance Baker was born in New Haven, Connecticut, on September 14, 1921, the ninth of 12 children of Caribbean immigrants from the island of Nevis.
Constance Baker Motley is survived by her husband Joel, a son, three sisters and a brother.
usinfo.state.gov /scv/Archive/2005/Oct/03-649621.html   (918 words)

  
 Aetna: African American History Calendar: 1985: Constance Baker Motley
With the courts as her forum, attorney Constance Baker Motley broke the segregation barriers of Southern universities, opening the doors for fls to attend higher education institutions of their choice.
Motley was born to West Indian immigrants in New Haven, Conn., where her father was a chef at several Yale University fraternity houses.
During her tenure with LDF, Constance Baker Motley successfully argued the case of James Meredith against the University of Mississippi before the U.S. Court of Appeals in the Fifth Circuit.
www.aetna.com /foundation/aahcalendar/2006/1985motley.html   (460 words)

  
 NAACP Legal Defense Fund -- News
It is our sad duty to announce the passing of Judge Constance Baker Motley, former LDF attorney and one of the giants of the legal profession and civil rights movement, who died this morning after a brief illness.
Judge Motley, who recently celebrated her 84th birthday, had an extraordinary life and career that took her from her New Haven, Connecticut childhood to become the first woman attorney at LDF, where she litigated, briefed, and argued some of the most important civil rights cases of her time.
Judge Motley was elected as Manhattan Borough President before her appointment, by President Lyndon Baines Johnson, to the U.S. District Court of the Southern District of New York in 1966.
www.naacpldf.org /content.aspx?article=694   (377 words)

  
 Constance Baker Motley — Infoplease.com
Motley won nine of the ten cases she argued before the U.S. Supreme Court, including the 1962 case in which James Meredith won admission to the University of Mississippi.
Following her judicial appointment, Motley was made chief judge of the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York in 1982 and senior judge in 1986.
Constance Baker Motley - Constance Baker Motley lawyer and jurist Born: 9/14/1921 Birthplace: New Haven, Conn. As a...
www.infoplease.com /ipa/A0932209.html   (340 words)

  
 Equal Justice Society
The Constance Baker Motley Civil Rights Fellowship is aimed at nurturing the talents of a new generation of progressive lawyers to transform anti-discrimination law and policy.
The new fellowship, named in honor of Constance Baker Motley, the first African American woman on the federal bench, will be awarded annually to a recent law school graduate committed to advancing racial justice through innovative legal strategies and progressive public policy.
Motley was born in New Haven, Conn., the ninth of twelve children born to immigrants from the Caribbean island of Nevis.
www.equaljusticesociety.org /press_2006_may22_motley1.html   (894 words)

  
 Legendary civil rights lawyer Constance Baker Motley dies at 84
Motley died Tuesday after a career that in its early days found her fighting blatant racism in many of the nation's landmark segregation cases.
Motley worked with a team of lawyers, psychologists, sociologists, historians and others to try to prove that segregation led to feelings of inferiority in fl children and harmed their ability to learn.
Always, at the heart of it, was Motley, from a case in Little Rock, Ark., in 1957 that led President Eisenhower to call in federal troops to protect nine fl high school students to leading the legal charge to win James Meredith's entry into the University of Mississippi in 1962.
www.freerepublic.com /focus/f-news/1493265/posts   (929 words)

  
 Constance Baker Motley — Infoplease.com
As a prominent civil rights attorney, Motley won nine of the ten cases she argued before the U.S. Supreme Court, including the 1962 case in which James Meredith won admission to the University of Mississippi.
Following her judicial appointment in 1966, Motley was made chief judge of the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York in 1982 and senior judge in 1986.
Constance Baker Motley - Constance Baker Motley Age: 84 attorney who was a pioneer in the civil rights movement.
www.infoplease.com /ipa/A0900715.html   (455 words)

  
 Judge Constance Baker Motley   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Constance Baker was born on September 14, 1921, in New Haven, Connecticut.
Following graduation from Columbia Law School, Constance Baker began her legal career working for the chief counsel for the NAACP's Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Thurgood Marshall, in the New York office.
Motley pursued a short political career, becoming in 1964, the first African-American woman elected to the New York State Senate.
www.brownat50.org /BrownBios/BioJudgeCBakerMotley.htm   (344 words)

  
 AFRO-AMERICAN ALMANAC - African-American History Resource   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Constance Baker was born on September 14, 1921, in New Haven, Connecticut, the daughter of West Indian immigrants from the Caribbean island of Nevis, Rachel Baker and Willoughby Baker.
Motley passed the New York State bar examination in 1948, and the following year was appointed assistant counsel at the Legal Defense Fund.
From 1964 to 1965 Motley served a full term in the New York State Senate as the first African-American female senator, and in 1965 she became the first woman to serve as a city borough president.
www.toptags.com /aama/bio/women/cmotley.htm   (525 words)

  
 Constance Baker Motley Papers, 1948-1988 : Biographical/Historical Note
Constance Juanita Baker was born on September 14th, 1921 in New Haven, Connecticut.
Rachel Baker was a founder of the New Haven NAACP and Motley was exposed to African American history, especially the writings of W.E.B. DuBois, in her Sunday School.
In January 1966 Motley was nominated by President Lyndon B. Johnson for a judgeship in the Federal District Court for the Southern District of New York--the nation's largest federal court covering Manhattan, the Bronx, and six New York counties.
asteria.fivecolleges.edu /findaids/sophiasmith/mnsss51_bioghist.html   (737 words)

  
 Columbia Magazine
That’s the dumbest thing I ever heard, a complete waste of time,” her supervisor told her in 1943, when Constance Baker Motley ’46LAW announced her plans to turn down a promotion at a lucrative wartime job to attend Columbia Law School.
Thinking back on her career, Motley is amazed at the increase in the number of women in positions of power today.
Born in New Haven, Connecticut, the ninth of 12 children of immigrants from the Caribbean island of Nevis, Motley was determined to attend college despite her hardworking parents’ inability to pay for it.
www.columbia.edu /cu/alumni/Magazine/Spring2004/motley.html   (496 words)

  
 civilrights.org -- Op-Ed: Constance Baker Motley and August Wilson: Restorers of Reality
The reason the deaths of Constance Baker Motley, the civil rights legend, former political officeholder and longtime federal judge, and August Wilson, certainly one of the leading playwrights of the modern American theater, are being so keenly felt is because their contributions to America and the world were so immense.
Constance Baker Motley was 84 at her death, 24 years senior to August Wilson; but the United States of America both came of age in was largely the same.
Constance Baker Motley, who joined the NAACP as a teenager, signed on with LDF while still in law school and soon became one of its most brilliant and courageous practitioners.
www.civilrights.org /issues/enforcement/details.cfm?id=36495   (654 words)

  
 Sophia Smith Collection: Agents of Social Change Online Exhibit - Constance Baker Motley
Constance Baker Motley began her remarkable career as a law clerk for Thurgood Marshall, then chief counsel for the NAACP's Legal Defense and Educational Fund.
The Papers of Judge Motley provide a record of the career of a pioneering African-American woman in her ascent to national prominence and her courageous fight against discrimination of any kind, often in the face of strong prejudice.
The Papers occupy 5.5 feet of shelf space and focus primarily on her tenures as State Senator, Borough President, and her first years as a federal judge in one of the busiest district courts in the country.
www.smith.edu /libraries/libs/ssc/agents/motley.html   (289 words)

  
 Constance Baker Motley, first Black woman federal judge and civil rights champion, dies Jet - Find Articles
Judge Constance Baker Motley, the first Black woman to serve as a federal judge and the first Black woman to serve in the New York State Senate, recently died in New York City.
Motley was born in New Haven, CT, the ninth of 12 children.
In addition to her son, Judge Motley is survived by her husband of 59 years, Joel Motley Jr., three sisters, a brother and three grandchildren.
www.findarticles.com /p/articles/mi_m1355/is_16_108/ai_n15759867   (826 words)

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