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Topic: Constantine I emperor


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  Constantine I (emperor) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
Constantine was well educated and served at the court of Diocletian in Nicomedia as a kind of hostage after the appointment of his father, a general, as one of the two caesares or junior emperors in the Tetrarchy in 293.
Constantine managed to be at his deathbed in Eboracum (York) of Roman Britain, where the loyal general Stephanos Tolberius, a North African and his troops loyal to his father's memory proclaimed him an Augustus ("Emperor").
A Letter from Constantine to Shapur II of Persia (both lived and reigned from 310 to 379), supposed to have been written in 324 urged him to protect the Christians in his realm… With the edicts of toleration in the Roman Empire, the followers of Christ would be regarded as allies of Persia's ancient enemy.
www.pineville.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Constantine_I_(emperor)   (4181 words)

  
 Constantine I (emperor) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Constantine is best remembered in modern times for the Edict of Milan in 313 and the Council of Nicaea in 325, which fully legalized and then legitimized Christianity in the Empire for the first time.
Constantine managed to be at his deathbed in Eboracum (York) of Roman Britain, where the loyal general Crocus, of Alamannic descent, and the troops loyal to his father's memory proclaimed him an Augustus ("Emperor").
Constantine was also known for being ruthless with his political enemies, deposing the Eastern Roman Emperor Licinius, his brother-in-law, by strangulation in 325 even though he had publicly promised not to execute him upon Licinius' surrender in 324.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Constantine_the_Great   (2370 words)

  
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Constantine the Great
Constantine was immediately proclaimed Caesar by his troops, and his title was acknowledged by Galerius somewhat hesitatingly.
Constantine increased the severity of the earlier law forbidding the concubinage of a free woman with a slave, and the Church did not regard this measure with disfavour.
Constantine was liberal to prodigality, was generous in almsgiving, and adorned the Christian churches magnificently.
www.newadvent.org /cathen/04295c.htm   (5939 words)

  
 Roman Emperors - DIR Constantine I
Constantine convened a synod of bishops to hear the complaint; the synod met in Rome's Lateran Council and is known as the Synod of Rome.
"The Tombs and Obits of the Byzantine Emperors (337-1042)." DOP 16 (1962) 1-60.
"The Tombs and Obits of the Byzantine Emperors (337-1042)." DOP 16 (1962) 1-60, esp. 5, 21-29, and 39-40.
www.roman-emperors.org /conniei.htm   (5004 words)

  
 Constantine III (emperor) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
Heraclius Constantine or Constantine III, was the eldest son of the Byzantine emperor Heraclius and his first wife Eudocia, born May 3, 612.
Heraclius Constantine was also the older half-brother of Heraclonas, the son of Heraclius' second wife Martina.
Constantine became emperor when Heraclius died in 641, and during his reign the Arabs conquered Egypt.
www.hackettstown.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Constantine_III_of_Byzantium   (175 words)

  
 Constantine I, Roman emperor. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
When his father was made caesar (subemperor), Constantine was left at the court of the emperor Diocletian, where he was under the watchful eye of Galerius, who was caesar with Constantius.
Before the battle Constantine, who was already sympathetic toward Christianity, is said by Eusebius of Caesarea to have seen in the sky a flaming cross inscribed with the words, “In this sign thou shalt conquer.” He adopted the cross and was victorious.
The chief contemporary historians of Constantine’s reign are Lactantius and Eusebius.
www.bartleby.com /65/co/Constnt1Rom.html   (881 words)

  
 Constantine II (emperor) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
Constantine II (February 317 - 340) was Roman Emperor (337 - 340).
The eldest son of Constantine I the Great and Fausta, he was born at Arles.
As Constans came of age, Constantine would not relinquish the guardianship and in 340 he marched against Constans Italy, but was defeated at Aquileia and died in battle.
www.bucyrus.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Constantine_II_(emperor)   (194 words)

  
 Constantine I (emperor) -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
Bronze coins struck for emperors often reveal details of their personal (The images and symbolic representations that are traditionally associated with a person or a subject) iconography.
Constantine and his (A smooth-textured sausage of minced beef or pork usually smoked; often served on a bread roll) Franks marched under the Christian standard of the labarum.
He was the sole emperor of the entire (An empire established by Augustus in 27 BC and divided in AD 395 into the Western Roman Empire and the Eastern or Byzantine Empire; at its peak lands in Europe and Africa and Asia were ruled by ancient Rome) Roman Empire.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/c/co/constantine_i_(emperor).htm   (2496 words)

  
 The Early Church - The Roman Emperor Constantine   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
Constantine was a pagan who worshipped the sun, and he was worried about the coming battle.
Constantine was taught about being a Christian, but he could still be ruthless and he did not get baptised until his old age.
Constantine, and his mother Helena, built great churches in the Holy Land to mark the places where Jesus was born, taught and was buried.
www.request.org.uk /main/history/romans/constantine.htm   (373 words)

  
 Emperor Constantine the Great - ReligionFacts.com
Constantine (273-336 AD) was a Roman empeor who converted to Christianity as a result of a vision during battle, issued edicts of toleration for Christianity that ended centuries of persecution, and called the Council of Nicea to resolve the Arian Controversy.
Constantine's mother Helena, on the other hand, was of mean position, and apparently was married after her son's birth.
Constantine was not too busy during this campaign to attend to the arrangement of the council of Arles, and to interest himself vehemently in the Donatist disputes.
www.religionfacts.com /christianity/people/constantine.htm   (4669 words)

  
 Constantine I (emperor) - Open Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
Flavius Valerius Constantinus (272–May 22, 337), commonly known as Constantine I or Constantine the Great, was proclaimed Augustus by his troops on July 25, 306 and ruled an ever-growing portion of the Roman Empire to his death.
Constantine managed to be at his deathbed in Eburacum (York), where troops loyal to his father's memory proclaimed him Emperor.
To say that there is little proof to support this claim is generous, but a few myth-loving citizens of the UK long to set Constantine alongside Arthur.
open-encyclopedia.com /Constantine_I_of_the_Roman_Empire   (1853 words)

  
 Constantine Converts: 312
Constantine became the emperor of Rome in 306, and was the most powerful person in his part of the world.
Constantine was victorious in the battle of the Milvian Bridge, and he continued to wear the symbol for Christ against every hostile power he faced.
Further, Constantine did not recount this vision to Eusebius until long after that battle had been won and he was in power.
www.thenagain.info /WebChron/EastEurope/ConstantineConverts.html   (959 words)

  
 ipedia.com: Constantine I (emperor) Article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
Constantine was well educated and served at the court of Diocletian in Nicomedia as a kind of hostage after the appointment of his father as one of the two Caesari, at that time a junior emperor, in the Tetrarchy in 293.
Another aspect of Constantine that might indicate an incomplete acceptance of Christianity to a modern view was his cruelty: he executed his own wife and eldest son in 326 for unknown reasons.
Whether or not Constantine's personal deity was Sol Invictus or Christ Crucified, by the end of the 3rd century, Christian communities and their bishops had become a force to contend with, in urban centers especially.
www.ipedia.com /constantine_i__emperor_.html   (1828 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Emperor Constantine   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
Constantine managed to be at his deathbed in Eboracum (York, England), where troops loyal to his father's memory proclaimed him Emperor.
The great staring eyes in the iconography of Constantine (illustration above, right), though not specifically Christian, show how official images were moving away from early imperial conventions of realistic portrayal towards schematic representations: the Emperor as Emperor, not merely as this particular individual Constantine, with his characteristic broad jaw and cleft chin.
His victory in 312 AD over Maxentius at the Battle of Milvian Bridge resulted in his becoming Western Augustus, or ruler of the entire western half of the empire.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Emperor-Constantine   (1944 words)

  
 Constantine I, Roman emperor
Constantine I, Roman emperor: Bibliography - Bibliography The chief contemporary historians of Constantine's reign are Lactantius and Eusebius.
Constantine I, Roman emperor: A Christian Empire - A Christian Empire Constantine was now sole ruler of the empire, and in a reign of peace he set...
Pieces of statue of Constantine I (Emperor of Rome from 307 to 337 a-c) in front of the Palace of the Conservator, on the Capitole square.
www.infoplease.com /ce6/people/A0813312.html   (308 words)

  
 AllRefer.com - Constantine I, Roman emperor (Ancient History, Rome, Biography) - Encyclopedia
AllRefer.com - Constantine I, Roman emperor (Ancient History, Rome, Biography) - Encyclopedia
Constantine I, Roman emperor, Ancient History, Rome, Biographies
Constantine I or Constantine the Great[kon´stuntEn, –tIn] Pronunciation Key, 288?–337, Roman emperor, b.
reference.allrefer.com /encyclopedia/C/Constnt1Rom.html   (158 words)

  
 History of Constantine the Great   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
Biography of Constantine as written in the Catholic Encyclopedia
"The Conversion to Christianity of the Roman Emperor Constantine" by Sergio Caggia and Paul Gwynne
Gamma Rho Chapter celebrates the Birthday of Constantine
www.shsu.edu /~eng_wpf/con-hist.html   (60 words)

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