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Topic: Constantine I of the Roman Empire


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  Constantine I (emperor) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Constantine is best remembered in modern times for the Edict of Milan in 313 and the Council of Nicaea in 325, which fully legalized and then legitimized Christianity in the Empire for the first time.
Constantine managed to be at his deathbed in Eboracum (York) of Roman Britain, where the loyal general Crocus, of Alamannic descent, and the troops loyal to his father's memory proclaimed him an Augustus ("Emperor").
Constantine was also known for being ruthless with his political enemies, deposing the Eastern Roman Emperor Licinius, his brother-in-law, by strangulation in 325 even though he had publicly promised not to execute him upon Licinius' surrender in 324.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Constantine_I_of_the_Roman_Empire   (2345 words)

  
 Constantine I of the Roman Empire - FreeEncyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Constantine was well educated and served at the court of Diocletian after the appointment of his father as one of the two Caesari, at that time a junior emperor, in the Tetrarchy in 293.
Constantine is perhaps best known for being the first Roman Emperor to endorse Christianity, as a result of his victory in the Battle of Milvian Bridge, which he credited to the Christian God.
He was succeeded by his three sons, Constantine II, Constantius II and Constans, who secured their hold on the empire with the murder of a number of relatives and supporters of Constantine.
openproxy.ath.cx /co/Constantine_I_of_the_Roman_Empire.html   (583 words)

  
 Constantine I (emperor) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Constantine was well educated and served at the court of Diocletian in Nicomedia as a kind of hostage after the appointment of his father, a general, as one of the two caesares or junior emperors in the Tetrarchy in 293.
Constantine managed to be at his deathbed in Eboracum (York) of Roman Britain, where the loyal general Stephanos Tolberius, a North African and his troops loyal to his father's memory proclaimed him an Augustus ("Emperor").
A Letter from Constantine to Shapur II of Persia (both lived and reigned from 310 to 379), supposed to have been written in 324 urged him to protect the Christians in his realm… With the edicts of toleration in the Roman Empire, the followers of Christ would be regarded as allies of Persia's ancient enemy.
www.bexley.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Constantine_I_of_the_Roman_Empire   (4189 words)

  
 Untitled Normal Page
In 330, Constantine founded a new capital of the Roman Empire, known as Constantinopolis, (or as the "New Rome"), in the Eastern half of the Empire.6 The division between the eastern and western Roman Empires had existed for hundreds of years.
Constantine saw that the only way for the empire to coexist with this new organization was to stop fighting it and embrace it.
All that was Christian was Roman, and all the was Roman was Christian.
mahan.wonkwang.ac.kr /link/med/christianity/burton.htm   (1898 words)

  
 Roman Emperors - DIR Constantine I
Lactantius, whom Constantine appointed tutor of his son Crispus [[11]] and who therefore must have been close to the imperial family, reports that during the night before the Battle of the Milvian Bridge Constantine was commanded in a dream to place the sign of Christ on the shields of his soldiers.
Constantine convened a synod of bishops to hear the complaint; the synod met in Rome's Lateran Council and is known as the Synod of Rome.
"Constantine's Epistle to the Bishops at the Council of Arles: A Defense of Imperial Authorship." JRH 17 (1993) 274-89.
www.roman-emperors.org /conniei.htm   (5004 words)

  
 Constantine II (emperor) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Constantine II (February 317 - 340) was Roman Emperor (337 - 340).
The eldest son of Constantine I the Great and Fausta, he was born at Arles.
As Constans came of age, Constantine would not relinquish the guardianship and in 340 he marched against Constans Italy, but was defeated at Aquileia and died in battle.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Constantine_II_of_the_Roman_Empire   (162 words)

  
 The Early Church - The Roman Emperor Constantine
Constantine was a pagan who worshipped the sun, and he was worried about the coming battle.
Constantine was taught about being a Christian, but he could still be ruthless and he did not get baptised until his old age.
Constantine, and his mother Helena, built great churches in the Holy Land to mark the places where Jesus was born, taught and was buried.
www.request.org.uk /main/history/romans/constantine.htm   (373 words)

  
 Constantine I (emperor) - Pictures   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Constantine was well educated and served at the court of Diocletian in Nicomedia as a kind of hostage after the appointment of his father Constantius, a general, as one of the two Caesari (at that time a junior emperor), in the Tetrarchy in 293.
A Letter from Constantine to Shapur II, supposed to have been written in 324 urged him to protect the Christians in his realm… With the edicts of toleration in the Roman empire, the followers of Christ would be regarded as allies of Persia's ancient enemy.
Another aspect of Constantine that might indicate an incomplete acceptance of Christianity (from a modern view) was his notorious cruelty: he executed his own wife and eldest son in 326 for unknown reasons.
greatestinfo.org /Constantine_I_of_the_Roman_Empire   (1872 words)

  
 Roman Empire Information   (Site not responding. Last check: )
An '''empire''' (also known technically, abstractly or disparagingly as an '''imperium''', and with powers known among Romans as "imperium") comprises a set of regions locally ruled by governors, viceroys or client monarchkings in the name of an emperor.
For many centuries, the term "Empire" in the West applied exclusively to states which considered themselves to be successors to the Roman Empire, such as the Byzantine Empire, the Holy Roman Empire, or, later, the Russian Empire ruled from the "Third Rome" (Moscow).
The Holy Roman Empire, itself in a sense a re-constitution of the Roman Empire, underwent many transformations in its long history, fissuring extensively, experimenting with federalism and re-constituting itself as the Austrian Empire - vastly different in nature and in territory.
www.echostatic.com /Roman_Empire.html   (1655 words)

  
 [No title]
May 22, 337), commonly known as Constantine I or Constantine the Great, was proclaimed Augustus by his troops on July 25, 306 and ruled an ever-growing portion of the Roman Empire to his death.
Donation of Constantine" was proved a forgery (though not until the 15th century, when the stories of Constantine's conversion were long-established "facts") it was attributed as documenting the conversion of the Roman Empire to Christianity for centuries.
Constantine II, Constantius II and Constans, who secured their hold on the empire with the murder of a number of relatives and supporters of Constantine.
en-cyclopedia.com /wiki/Constantine_I_of_the_Roman_Empire   (1856 words)

  
 Roman Emperors - DIR -Constantine II
Constantine II, whose full name was Flavius Claudius Constantinus, was the son of Constantine I and Fausta.
Following the death of their father on 22 May 337, and the subsequent murder of other relatives and heirs,[[9]] Constantine II and his two brothers met in the first part of September 337 in Pannonia where they were acclaimed Augusti by the army to apportion the empire among themselves.
The authors of PLRE wrongly claim that Constantine II was a bastard of Constantine I (A. Jones, J. Martindale, and J. Morris, The Prosopography of the Later Roman Empire [Cambridge, 1971], s.
www.roman-emperors.org /conii.htm   (1051 words)

  
 Constantine Converts: 312
Constantine became the emperor of Rome in 306, and was the most powerful person in his part of the world.
Constantine was victorious in the battle of the Milvian Bridge, and he continued to wear the symbol for Christ against every hostile power he faced.
From 312-320 Constantine was tolerant of paganism, keeping pagan gods on coins and retaining his pagan high priest title "Pontifex Maximus" in order to maintain popularity with his subjects, possibly indicating that he never understood the theology of Christianity.
www.thenagain.info /WebChron/EastEurope/ConstantineConverts.html   (959 words)

  
 roman empire
The Roman Empire controlled all of the Hellenized states that bordered the Mediterranean sea, as well as the Celtic regions of Northern Europe.
As Emperor, Augustus organized the affairs of his empire with aplomb; it is largely due to his genius that the Roman Empire lasted for as long as it did.
He was a master propagandist, and his patronage of the Roman writers Horace, Livy and (especially) Virgil allowed him to cement his position through use of poetry and prose.
www.fact-library.com /roman_empire.html   (2137 words)

  
 Constantine
Constantine was the first Roman ruler to become a follower of the Christian religion.
Constantine was born around A.D. 273 in Naissus, which is now part of the present-day country of Serbia in Eastern Europe.
At the time of Constantine's birth, the Roman Empire was divided into two parts—the Eastern Empire and the Western Empire.
www.harcourtschool.com /activity/biographies/constantine   (427 words)

  
 CONSTANTINE   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Constantine took the traditional title, "Pontifex Maximus." The title originally applied to Roman "high priests" who were the "great bridge builders" between man and the gods.
This amended creed was rewritten in 381 and stood as the Nicene Creed.
As written in 325, the creed failed to represent most bishops' thinking and dissent arose over an "enforced creed, a creed not representative of the church." Due to influence from Eusebius of Nicomedia, Constantine recalled Arius from exile in 328.
www.christianchronicler.com /history1/constantine.html   (1257 words)

  
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Constantine the Great
This event was the first break in Diocletian's scheme of a four-headed empire (tetrarchy) and was soon followed by the proclamation in Rome of Maxentius, the son of Maximian, a tyrant and profligate, as Caesar, October, 306.
Constantine, with a detachment of his army, boldly assailed a fresh force of the enemy coming to the relief of the besieged fortress and completely defeated it.
Constantine, however, increased the difficulties of the concubinatus, and forbade senators and the higher officials in the State and in the pagan priesthoods to
www.newadvent.org /cathen/04295c.htm   (5908 words)

  
 Constantine the Great
Constantine the Great was Emperor of the Roman Empire from AD 306 until his death at about the age of 57 in AD 337.
Constantine was first dragged into church issues in 313, when members of the Donatist sect asked him to mediate their dispute with the Church.
Constantine did not have a time machine and was therefore not involved with the Crusades, the Turks, or the Muslims.
www.kencollins.com /poll-04.htm   (1058 words)

  
 The [True] ORDER OF SAINT CONSTANTINE THE GREAT - ROMAN EMPIRE to NEW BYZANTIUM
Constantine followed Diocletian to the imperial city of Nicomedia in Asia Minor, while Helen, now divorced, took up residence in Drepanum, a small town near Nicomedia, in order to be near her son.
Constantine’s marriage to Fausta, daughter of Maximian and Eutropia, paralleled Constantius’ marriage to Theodora, stepdaughter of Maximian by Eutropia’s former marriage.
Constantine’s city, prior to its fall, had also survived the invasion and plundering of its wealth by its Western counterpart on the pretext of the Crusades.
www.new-byzantium.org /orderof.html   (5606 words)

  
 Constantine the Great   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Constantine, however, managed to unite the Empire through a series of military successes culminating in defeat of his principal western rival Maxentius at the Battle of Milvian Bridge in 312.
Although Constantine avoided the mistake of Diocletian in placing the western sector of the Empire under rule of a potential rival, the geographical span of the Empire created an inherent instability that was to result in a conclusive division of the Empire into two parts just 65 years later.
Constantine attributed his victory at the Battle of Milvian Bridge to his having fought it under the sign of Christ--because of a dream on the eve of battle.
www.boglewood.com /sicily/constantine.html   (326 words)

  
 Church History: The Christian Empire-- 313-476   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Constantine, head and fragments from a colossal statue: on display in the courtyard of the Palazzo dei Consevatori, Rome.
Constantine claimed that he had a dream in which he saw the Chi-Rho symbol (a monogram composed of the first two Greek letters for the word Christ, X and P) and the words, "By this sign you will conquer."
Changes in Christianity by 500 A.D. During the time of the Christian Empire, the first ecumenical councils were convened; early statements of orthodoxy, such as the Nicene Creed, were written; and the church recognized and Old and New Testament but the canon was not yet completely closed.
gbgm-umc.org /umw/bible/ce.stm   (1098 words)

  
 Q Document used by Constantine to Write the Roman Empire Universal Church’s New Testament
Jesus’; wisdom was omitted because Constantine wanted people to be dependent on the hierarchy of the Roman Empire’s Universal Church for answers to their questions.
The leaders of Christian faiths, throughout the Roman Empire, were also informed that the Protector of Christianity would maintain the purity of Jesus’; spiritual wisdom, by presenting Jesus’; teachings and wisdom in an allegorical manner.
After graphically demonstrating that disagreement to Constantine’s decisions would not be tolerated, the representative said that all delegates, and their congregations, now had two choices, they could convert to Constantine’s new Roman Universal Church, or they could die a heretic.
www.thetruejesus.org /rome/q_doc.htm   (1414 words)

  
 Medieval Sourcebook: Eusebius of Caesarea: Life of Constantine
And God himself, whom Constantine worshiped, has confirmed this truth by the clearest manifestations of his will, being present to aid him (1) at the commencement, during the course, and at the end of his reign, and holding him up to the human race as an instructive example of godliness.
So Constantine, in his excessive humanity, thought and was willing patiently to bear past injuries, and extend his forgiveness to one who so ill deserved it; but Licinius, far from renouncing his evil practices, still added crime to crime, and ventured on more daring atrocities than ever.
Each separate portion of the Roman dominion became blended with the rest; the Eastern nations united with those of the West, and the whole body of the Roman empire was graced as it were by its head in the person of a single and supreme ruler, whose sole authority pervaded the whole.
www.fordham.edu /halsall/basis/vita-constantine.html   (15019 words)

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