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Topic: Constantine III


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  Roman Emperors - DIR Western Roman Emperors from 407-425
Drinkwater, J.F., 'The Usurpers Constantine III (407-411) and Jovinus (411-413)', Britannia 29 (1998), 269-298.
Constantine III raised Constans to the rank of Augustus in late 409 or early 410 before sending him back to Spain; lead elements of Constans' army were sent into the peninsula.
Maximus was the son (or possibly a retainer) of Gerontius, a general of Constantine III in Spain in 409.
www.roman-emperors.org /westemp5.htm   (2391 words)

  
  Constantine III (usurper) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Constantine crossed the English Channel to the continent at Bononia, and historians have assumed he took with him all of the mobile troops left in Britain, thus denuding the province of any military protection and explaining their disappearance in the early fifth century.
Constantine's response to this tightening circle of enemies was a final desperate gamble: with the remaining troops left to him, he marched on Italy, encouraged by the entreaties of one Allobich, who wanted to replace Honorius with a more capable ruler.
Constantine held out, hoping for the return of his general Edobich, who was raising troops in northern Gaul amongst the Franks, but on his return Edobich was defeated with a simple stratagem.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Constantine_III_of_Rome   (1181 words)

  
 Constantine III (usurper) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Constantine's two generals and the Frank, leading the vanguard of his forces, were defeated by Sarus, Stilicho's lieutenant, with Nebiogastes being first trapped in, then killed outside, Valence.
Constantine's response to this tightening circle of enemies was a final desperate gamble: with the remaining troops left to him, he marched on Italy, encouraged by the entreaties of one, who wanted to replace Honorius with a more capable ruler.
Constantine's Praetorian prefect, who had replaced Apollinaris a few years earlier, abandoned Constantine, to be caught up in the rebellion of Jovinus in the Rhineland.
www.hackettstown.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Constantine_III_of_Rome   (1221 words)

  
 Constantine III
Constantine was eventually captured by Constantius, the general of Honorius, and was sent to Italy for execution (411 A.D.).
Placidius Valentinianus was born in 419 A.D., the son of Constantius III and Galla Placidia.
Valentinian III was assassinated in March, 455, the victim of a plot hatched by the senator Petronius Maximus.
www.forumancientcoins.com /historia/coins/r7/constantine_3.htm   (1100 words)

  
 Constantine III (emperor) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Heraclius Constantine or Constantine III, was the eldest son of the Byzantine emperor Heraclius and his first wife Eudocia, born May 3, 612.
Heraclius Constantine was also the older half-brother of Heraclonas, the son of Heraclius' second wife Martina.
Constantine became emperor when Heraclius died in 641, and during his reign the Arabs conquered Egypt.
www.hackettstown.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Constantine_III_of_Byzantium   (175 words)

  
 List of Byzantine Emperors   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Constantine VI the Blinded (771-797, ruled 780 - 797) — son of Leo IV
Constantine VII Porphyrogenitus (the Purple-born) (905-959, ruled 913 - 959) — son of Leo VI
Constantine VIII Porphyrogentius (960-1028, ruled 1025 - 1028) — son of Romanus II, brother of Basil II
www.1-free-software.com /en/wikipedia/l/li/list_of_byzantine_emperors.html   (1469 words)

  
 Constantine III
Next Constantine III demanded that Honorius recognize him as Augustus, which the latter saw himself forced to do, in view of his desperately weakened position with the usurper in the west and Alaric in Italy.
Constantine III sent his son Constans to depose the general of his overall military command.
Hence Constantine III was taken outside the city of Ravenna and was put to death (AD 411).
www.roman-empire.net /collapse/constantine-III.html   (764 words)

  
 Dynasty
Constantine III: The Bold: Born 410, Emperor 429 to 460.
Gordius: born 595, prince of the realm 615 to 655, regent to Timeron, 635 to 646.
Constantine XI: born 629, Heir to the Throne.
www.mindspring.com /~seamilo/dynasty.htm   (326 words)

  
 Medieval Sourcebook: Eusebius of Caesarea: Life of Constantine
And God himself, whom Constantine worshiped, has confirmed this truth by the clearest manifestations of his will, being present to aid him (1) at the commencement, during the course, and at the end of his reign, and holding him up to the human race as an instructive example of godliness.
Nor did the imperial throne remain long unoccupied: for Constantine invested himself with his father's purple, and proceeded from his father's palace, presenting to all a renewal, as it were, in his own person, of his father's life and reign.
So Constantine, in his excessive humanity, thought and was willing patiently to bear past injuries, and extend his forgiveness to one who so ill deserved it; but Licinius, far from renouncing his evil practices, still added crime to crime, and ventured on more daring atrocities than ever.
www.fordham.edu /halsall/basis/vita-constantine.html   (15019 words)

  
 List of Byzantine Emperors Information - TextSheet.com
Constantine IX Monomachus, (1000-1054, ruled 1042 - 1054)
Constantine X Ducas, (1006-1067, ruled 1059 - 1067)
Constantine XI Palaeologus, (1405-1453, ruled 1449 - 1453)
www.medbuster.com /encyclopedia/l/li/list_of_byzantine_emperors.html   (702 words)

  
 CONSTANTINE III OF SCOTLAND FACTS AND INFORMATION   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Constantine III (Causantín mac Cuilén) was king of Scotland from 995 to 997.
Much like his predecessors, Constantine was killed in 997, allowing his predecessor's nephew, Kenneth, to claim the throne.
Constantine III was the fifth king of Scotland to be murdered in succession.
www.witwib.com /en:Constantine_III_of_Scotland   (144 words)

  
 Roman Emperors DIR Heraclonas
Heraclius Constantine, age 28, was the only son of Heraclius' first marriage to Eudokia (Fabia) while Heraclonas, age 15, was the eldest son of Martina, Heraclius' niece and second wife.
She constantly opposed the policies of Heraclius Constantine, and this opposition led to the development of two factions within the government.
Shortly after Heraclius Constantine's death, the Patriarch Pyrrhos, one of Martina's primary advisors, became more influential and was able to revive the policy of Monotheletism.
www.roman-emperors.org /heraclon.htm   (574 words)

  
 List of Byzantine Emperors - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Constantine VIII Porphyrogenitus (960-1028, ruled 1025 - 1028) – son of Romanus II, brother of Basil II
Constantine IX Monomachus (1000-1055, ruled 1042 - 1055) – married Michael IV's widow (Zoe's third husband)
Nicephorus III Botaniates (1001-1081, ruled 1078 - 1081) – married Michael VII's wife Maria of Alania (Maria was accused of bigamy as Michael was still alive)
www.lexington-fayette.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Byzantine_Emperor   (1544 words)

  
 Constantine III of Rome - FreeEncyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Constantine III declared himself emperor in the West (407 - 411).
Constantine crossed over the English Channel to the continent at Bononia, and historians have assumed he took with him all of the mobile troops left in Britain, thus denuding the province of any military protection and explaining their disappearance in the early fifth century.
However, Constantine sent forth another army headed by Edobich[?] and Gerontius[?], and Sarus was forced to retreat into Italy, needing to buy his passage through the Alpine passes from the Bacaudae[?] who controlled them.
openproxy.ath.cx /co/Constantine_III_of_Rome.html   (999 words)

  
 AllRefer.com - Constantine, Roman general (Ancient History, Rome, Biography) - Encyclopedia
He was proclaimed emperor by the Roman troops in Britain in 407 and led a revolt in Gaul and Spain against the Western emperor Honorius.
Constantine forced recognition from Honorius as joint emperor, but his triumph was short.
The counterrevolt of Gerontius halted him, and he was defeated by Honorius' general Constantius (later Emperor Constantius III).
reference.allrefer.com /encyclopedia/C/ConstntRom.html   (201 words)

  
 Ruin - Magnus Maximus - Constantine III   (Site not responding. Last check: )
CONSTANTINE III was proclaimed emperor by the British garrison in 407.
Constantine's generals ran out after him (Sarus) with all their might and main, and it was only with great difficulty that he escaped.
Constantine, who still thought that matters would go according to his purpose, caused his son to be proclaimed emperor instead of Caesar, and determined to possess himself of Italy.
www.stephen.j.murray.btinternet.co.uk /maximus.htm   (4661 words)

  
 The Generations of Ambrosius part 2: Ambrosius, the Elder, by Michael Veprauskas
The careers of Magnus Maximus and Constantine III are quite parallel; their rise to power by the acclamation of Roman soldiers in Britain, their subsequent invasion of Gaul, the extent of their domains, their acknowledgment as co-Emperors by the legitimate Emperors out of political expediency.
Constantine also desired to increase the involvement of the Roman nobility in the government of the empire and took steps to make it happen.
"Constantine was, it is true, extending the pool of experienced men that could be drawn on by substantially increasing the number of successful members of the imperial service who were admitted to the senate.
www.vortigernstudies.org.uk /artgue/mikeambr1.htm   (4776 words)

  
 Britannia: Usurpation of Constantine III
The usurper took the title Constantine III, and removed still more troops from the island to campaign in Gaul and Spain, for the purpose of solidifying his imperial claims.
Constantine established his headquarters at Arles and proclaimed his son, Constans, who had campaigned so successfully for him in Spain, co-emperor.
Constantine, meanwhile, was under siege by Honorius' troops at Arles.
www.britannia.com /history/bb407.html   (313 words)

  
 Constantius III - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Flavius Constantius, whose name is traditionally anglicized as Constantius III, was a late Roman general, politician, and emperor.
He was the power behind the throne for much of the 410s, and in 421 briefly became co-emperor of the Western Empire with Honorius.
Constantius' success in rising from head of the dwindling Roman army to Imperial rank obviously influenced the actions of later holders of the patrician office, a list that includes Aetius and Ricimer; however, only Petronius Maximus would ultimately make the same leap, and his reign would prove to be even shorter than Constantius'.
www.bucyrus.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Constantius_III   (362 words)

  
 Constantine on Encyclopedia.com   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Franky G attends the world premiere of the Warner Bros. release "Constantine" held at Grauman's Chinese Theater in Hollywood, California on February 16, 2005.
Scott Ian, of Anthrax, attends the world premiere of the Warner Bros. release "Constantine" held at Grauman's Chinese Theater in Hollywood, California on February 16, 2005.
Thomas Jane attends the world premiere of the Warner Bros. release "Constantine" held at Grauman's Chinese Theater in Hollywood, California on February 16, 2005.
www.encyclopedia.com /html/C/ConstntR1om.asp   (671 words)

  
 CHURCH FATHERS: Life of Constantine, Book III (Eusebius)
IN this manner that spirit who is the hater of good, actuated by envy at the blessing enjoyed by the Church, continued to raise against her the stormy troubles of intestine discord, in the midst of a period of peace and joy.
Constantine is the first prince of any age who bound together such a garland as this with the bond of peace, and presented it to his Saviour as a thank-offering for the victories he had obtained over every foe, thus exhibiting in our own times a similitude of the apostolic company.
As soon, then, as his commands were issued, these engines of deceit were cast down from their proud eminence to the very ground, and the dwelling-places of error, with the statues and the evil spirits which they represented, were overthrown and utterly destroyed.
www.newadvent.org /fathers/25023.htm   (9795 words)

  
 List of Byzantine Emperors   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Constantine IV (649-685, ruled 668 - 685) – son of Constans II Justinian II Rhinotmetus (the Slit-nosed) (668-711, ruled 685 - 695) – son of Constantine IV Non-dynastic
Constantine VI the Blinded (771-797, ruled 780 - 797) – son of Leo IV Irene the Athenian (755-803, ruled 797 - 802) – wife of Leo IV, mother of Constantine VI Non-dynastic
Constantine VII Porphyrogenitus (the Purple-born) (905-959, ruled 913 - 959) – son of Leo VI Romanus I Lecapenus (co-emperor), (870-948, ruled 919 - 944) – father-in-law of Constantine VII
www.worldhistory.com /wiki/L/List-of-Byzantine-Emperors.htm   (1397 words)

  
 Rulers of Scotand from Kenneth McAlpin (843-858) to Donald II (889 - 900)
Constantine succeeded the reign of his uncle Donald I, as ruler of the united Picts and Scots(862-877) His reign was occupied with many conflicts with the Norsemen.
Constantine was slain at a battle at Inverdovat in Fife, at the hands of another band of northern marauders.
King of the Scots (from 889), son of Constantine I and successor to Eochaid and Giric (reigned 878-889).
www.maccorquodale.com /History.htm   (898 words)

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