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Topic: Constitutions of Clarendon


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  Constitutions of Clarendon - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Constitutions of Clarendon were a set of legislative procedures passed by Henry II of England in 1164.
The Constitutions of Clarendon were Henry II's attempts to rein in the problem by claiming that once the ecclesiastical courts had tried and defrocked clergymen, the Church could no longer protect the individual, and convicted former clergy could be further punished under the jurisdiction of royal courts.
The Constitutions of Clarendon were a part of Henry II's larger expansion of royal jurisdiction into the Church and civil law, the defining aspect of his reign.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Constitutions_of_Clarendon   (315 words)

  
 Constitutions of Clarendon - Hutchinson encyclopedia article about Constitutions of Clarendon   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
In English history, a series of resolutions agreed by a council summoned by Henry II at Clarendon in Wiltshire in 1164.
The Constitutions forbade the church to convict laymen on secret information, and demanded that clergy accused of a felony be tried in the royal courts.
The Constitutions aimed at limiting the secular power of the clergy, and were abandoned after the murder of Thomas à Becket.
encyclopedia.farlex.com /Constitutions+of+Clarendon   (130 words)

  
 The Constitutions of Clarendon
The Constitutions of Clarendon represent an attempt by Henry II to exert state control over the Church in England.
The Constitutions were composed of 16 articles, which laid out the extent of papal influence in the realm and the degree to which church members were subservient to the crown and English legal custom.
And because of discensions and discords which had arisen between the clergy and the lord king's justices and the barons of the kingdom concerning the customs and dignities, this recognition has been made before the archbishops and bishops and clergy, and the earls and barons and great men of the kingdom.
www.britainexpress.com /History/medieval/clarendon.htm   (1057 words)

  
 EDWARD HYDE, 1ST EARL OF CLARENDON - LoveToKnow Article on EDWARD HYDE, 1ST EARL OF CLARENDON   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
English historian and statesman, son of Henry Hyde of Dinton, Wiltshire, a member of a family for some time established at Norbury, Cheshire, was born on the I8th of February i6og.
In later years Clarendon declared next the immediate blessing and providence of God Almighty that he owed all the little he knew and the little good that was in him to the friendships and conversation.
Two of the dukes children survived their father: Margaret, countess of Salisbury (1473-1541), and Edward, earl of Warwick (1475-1499), who passed the greater part of his life in prison and was beheaded in November,49g.
1911encyclopedia.org /C/CL/CLARENDON_EDWARD_HYDE_1ST_EARL_OF.htm   (1370 words)

  
 Printable Version on Encyclopedia.com
CLARENDON, CONSTITUTIONS OF [Clarendon, Constitutions of] 1164, articles issued by King Henry II of England at the Council of Clarendon defining the customs governing relations between church and state.
After much debate, the English prelates assented to the Constitutions at Clarendon, but after the pope had condemned the codification, Becket repudiated his agreement.
However, for the most part the Constitutions of Clarendon remained in effect as part of the law of the land.
www.encyclopedia.com /printable.aspx?id=1E1:clarendocn   (122 words)

  
 Hotels near Canterbury Cathedral
The Constitutions of Clarendon were, from top to bottom, an extreme challenge to the authority and the autonomy of the Church in England.
One of the most contentious issues was the punishment of the criminal clergy, which the Constitutions of Clarendon arrogated ultimately to the royal courts rather than giving the final say to the ecclesiastical courts.
Thomas at first agreed to the Constitutions of Clarendon but later recanted, resulting in a six- year period of exile and the confiscation of all his revenues and those of his property.
www.guidetorichmond.co.uk /canterbury.html   (1052 words)

  
 Constitutions Clarendon - Search Results - MSN Encarta
Clarendon, Constitutions of, name given to 16 articles adopted at Clarendon, England, in 1164, by the archbishop of Canterbury, Saint Thomas à...
When Theobald died in 1161, the king decided to make his chancellor the archbishop of Canterbury, the most important ecclesiastical officer in...
Clarendon, Edward Hyde, 1st Earl of (1609-1674), English statesman and historian, born in Dinton, and educated at the University of Oxford.
encarta.msn.com /encnet/refpages/search.aspx?q=Constitutions+Clarendon   (127 words)

  
 Medieval Sourcebook: Constitutions of Clarendon, 1164
The Constitutions of Clarendon, as White and Notestein have said, are so well-known to need much of an introduction.
Representative of the initial stages of the epic battle between Henry II and archbishop Thomas a Becket, the Constitutions were an attempt by Henry II to define the royal prerogatives as they existed before the anarchy of Stephen's reign.
And because of discesnsions and discords which hadarisen between the clergy and the lord king's justices and the barons of thekingdom concerning the customs and dignities, this recognition has been madebefore the archbishops and bishops and clergy, and the earls and barons andgreat men of the kingdom.
www.fordham.edu /halsall/source/cclarendon.html   (974 words)

  
 Supreme Court - Becket and Henry II: Exile: Lawlink NSW   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
In the Assize of Clarendon and in the probable Assize of Disseisin, Henry II in substance, if not form, declared a kings peace which was so wide ranging as to constitute a general peace.
Detailed provision was made in the Assize of Clarendon for the mechanism of investigation, trial and punishment and for the specific responsibilities of the sheriffs, including their ability to intervene notwithstanding a claim to exemption or privilege.
No reference was made to the Constitutions of Clarendon, not even in the cases of Herbert of Bosham and John of Salisbury, from whom an oath to obey had been demanded at Angers in 1166.
www.lawlink.nsw.gov.au /sc\sc.nsf/pages/spigelman_081002   (15205 words)

  
 World history and events in 1164
The Constitutions of Clarendon place limitations on the clergy
Thomas Becket is accused of embezzlement & contempt of court
Becket rejects the Council of Clarendon & is condemned at the Council of North'ton
www.badley.info /history/1164.year.html   (137 words)

  
 Clarendon   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
Clarendon appears in a document as a military gathering-place as early as the 1070s.
The war and the death of Professor Borenius cut excavations short, and today Clarendon is a tragedy.
Perhaps most significantly, the Constitutions of Clarendon, which have been described as England's first constitution.
www.astoft.co.uk /clarendonpalace.htm   (334 words)

  
 [No title]
The general idea of the answer has been, and still is in many quarters, to assign Thomas Becket to that large elysium for historical figures who by their death have won the victory for which they struggled in life.
Those scholars, however, how have studied closely how some of the isues raised in the Constitutions of Clarendon (1164) worked themselves out in practice after Becket's martyrdom, have shown that things were not so simple (Cheney, 1941, 177-97; Gray, 1952).
In the day-to-day relations of the secular and ecclesiastical courts compromise and co-operation is constantly evident, and the developing complexity of legal problems and procedures favoured now one jurisdiction, now the other (Cheney, 1956).
www.bris.ac.uk /Depts/History/ITOne/wordtest1a.doc   (301 words)

  
 Britannia: Sources of British History
The Constitutions of Clarendon are representative of the initial stages of the epic battle between Henry II and archbishop Thomas a Becket.
The Constitutions were an attempt by Henry II to define the royal prerogatives as they existed before the anarchy of Stephen's reign.
And because of discesnsions and discords which had arisen between the clergy and the lord king's justices and the barons of the kingdom concerning the customs and dignities, this recognition has been made before the archbishops and bishops and clergy, and the earls and barons and great men of the kingdom.
www.britannia.com /history/docs/clarendn.html   (834 words)

  
 Clarendon, Constitutions of on Encyclopedia.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
Religion and the Indonesian constitution: a recent debate.
The virtues of presidential government: why Professor Ackerman is wrong to prefer the German to the U.S. Constitution.
Informants, rats, and tattletales: loyalty, fear, and the Constitution.
www.encyclopedia.com /html/c/clarendoc1n.asp   (296 words)

  
 Untitled
In 1164, Henry II went so far as to codify his laws in the Constitutions of Clarendon, which ordered that priests be tried in the secular courts.
The public outcry was so great that Henry had to rescind the Constitutions of Clarendon, and do penance for the murder of the martyred archbishop (Becket was later canonized by the Church).
Though he couldn't subject the Church to his will with the Constitutions of Clarendon, his judicial reforms were far-reaching and lasting.
www.suite101.com /print_article.cfm/plantagenet_kings/50157   (924 words)

  
 Ireland Information Guide , Irish, Counties, Facts, Statistics, Tourism, Culture, How
Henry called another assembly at Clarendon for January 30, 1164, at which he presented his demands in sixteen constitutions.
What he asked involved the abandonment of the clergy's independence and of their direct connection with Rome; he employed all his arts to induce their consent and was apparently successful with all but the primate.
Henry endeavoured to rid himself of his antagonist by judicial process and summoned him to appear before a great council at Northampton on October 8, 1164, to answer charges of contempt of royal authority and malfeasance in the Lord Chancellor's office.
www.irelandinformationguide.com /Thomas_Becket   (1406 words)

  
 Supreme Court - Becket and Henry II: The Martyrdom: Lawlink NSW   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
He had not, however, abandoned his ultimate objective of having the Constitutions recognised, with all that entailed in terms of preserving, in his view, or expanding, in Becket's view, the authority of the monarchy.
It is not credible, further, that Henry agreed to Becket asserting an ecclesiastical disciplinary authority of a character inconsistent with the Constitutions of Clarendon.
After all the care that had been taken to omit any reference to the Constitutions or the customs in the settlement discussions, the first thing Becket had done on his return was to flagrantly breach an indisputable, longstanding custom of the realm.
www.lawlink.nsw.gov.au /sc\sc.nsf/pages/spigelman_030929   (11000 words)

  
 AllRefer.com - Clarendon, Constitutions of (British And Irish History) - Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
AllRefer.com - Clarendon, Constitutions of (British And Irish History) - Encyclopedia
Clarendon, Constitutions of, 1164, articles issued by King Henry II of England at the Council of Clarendon defining the customs governing relations between church and state.
More articles from AllRefer Reference on Clarendon, Constitutions of
reference.allrefer.com /encyclopedia/C/ClarendoCn.html   (227 words)

  
 Brewer, E. Cobham. Dictionary of Phrase & Fable. Clarendon.
Shaw, G.B. Stein, G. Stevenson, R.L. Wells, H.G. Reference > Brewer’s Dictionary > Clarendon.
Laws made by a general council of nobles and prelates, held at Clarendon, in Wiltshire, in 1164, to check the power of the Church, and restrain the prerogatives of ecclesiastics.
These famous ordinances, sixteen in number, define the limits of the patronage and jurisdiction of the Pope in these realms.
www.bartleby.com /81/3638.html   (90 words)

  
 V.III.12 E. de Evesham, Quadrilogus de T. Becket; etc. s. xiv1   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
Apart from the addition of item 7, this manuscript represents a collection of Becket materials found in at least seventeen other manuscripts, see A. Duggan, Thomas Becket: a textual history of his letters, (Oxford; 1980), pp.
Among the eleven medieval copies in England there is one which matches this copy in all the particulars noted below save for the omission in the Constitutions of Clarendon clause 9 (f.
EVDT i,163-167, which lacks the preamble to the Constitutions of Clarendon, found here in a version consistently closest to MS Ag in CandSI ii, 877-878.
www.dur.ac.uk /~dul0www/asc/medmss/apviii12.htm   (932 words)

  
 Norman Law
All barons who have founded abbeys for which they have charters of the king of England, or ancient right of tenure, shall have, as they ought to have, their custody when vacant.
47- A11 forests constituted as such in our time shall straightway be annulled; and the same shall be done for river banks made into places of defence by us in our time.
We shall straightway return all hostages and charters which were delivered to us by Englishmen as a surety for peace or faithful service.
angevin.org /norman_law.htm   (5579 words)

  
 The Avalon Project : Constitutions of Clarendon. 1164.
In ten years we hear of more than one hundred unpunished cases of murder among them.
It was to put a stop to such lawlessness that Henry caused the constitutions of Clarendon to be drawn up by two of his justiciars.
They contain nothing new, no right that did not belong by precedent to the crown.
www.yale.edu /lawweb/avalon/medieval/constcla.htm   (1076 words)

  
 Constitutions of Clarendon
Clarendon, Constitutions of, 1164, articles issued by King
Henry II of England at the Council of Clarendon defining the customs governing relations between church and state.
More on Constitutions of Clarendon from Fact Monster:
www.factmonster.com /ce6/history/A0812404.html   (245 words)

  
 BBC - Radio 4 - This Sceptred Isle - Becket
The feud came to a head over the Constitutions of Clarendon in 1164.
This was a written statement of Henry II's view of his customary rights over the English Church.
Thomas Becket accepted the Constitutions but later rejected them and was called to trial for contempt of court by Henry II.
www.bbc.co.uk /radio4/history/sceptred_isle/page/17.shtml?question=17   (515 words)

  
 CONSTITUTIONS OF CLARENDON - LoveToKnow Article on CONSTITUTIONS OF CLARENDON   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
CONSTITUTIONS OF CLARENDON - LoveToKnow Article on CONSTITUTIONS OF CLARENDON
CLARENDON, CONSTITUTIONS OF, a body of English laws issued at Clarendon in I164, by which Henry II.
(Cambridge, 1898), and F. Maitland, Roman Canon Law in the Church of England (1898); the text of the Constitutions is printed by W. Stubbs in Select Charters (Oxford, 1895).
www.1911ency.org /C/CL/CLARENDON_CONSTITUTIONS_OF.htm   (331 words)

  
 WorldLII - Categories - Research - Legal History
Full text of the Constitutions of Clarendon, a written statement by Henry II of England, made at Clarendon in 1164 to define the royal prerogatives as they existed before the anarchy of Stephen's reign (Internet History Sourcebooks Project)
Examines the roots of constitutional government in the United States and around the world
Contains translations of the constitutions and other select documents enacted by Napoleon, the Senate, the Tribunal and the Legislative Body between 1799 and 1815 under the Consulate, Empire and Restoration (The Napoleon Series)
www.worldlii.org /catalog/50515.html   (449 words)

  
 NetSERF: Tell A Friend
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Your friend, (your name), thought you might be interested in knowing about NetSERF's Constitutions of Clarendon section (/Law/Common/Legal_Documents/Constitutions_of_Clarendon/).
NetSERF is a meta-index of medieval resources on the Internet that has been serving the online medieval community since 1995.
www.netserf.org /Features/Tell_a_Friend/default.cfm?SectionID=407   (175 words)

  
 Broadview Press: Medieval England, 1000 - 1500: A Reader
Along with classic texts, such as the Domesday Book and Magna Carta, the collection also contains materials on less frequently addressed topics, such as the persecution of Jews, and the writings of a number of women, such as Margery of Kempe and Queen Isabella of Angoulême.
"Emilie Amt’s judicious selection of sources covers the range of human experience in Medieval England, from the classic political texts of the Constitutions of Clarendon and Magna Carta to the lives of ordinary people that we glimpse in coroners’ rolls, chronicle accounts of the Black Death, and trials following the Peasants’ Revolt.
Gerald of Wales's Description of Henry II The Constitutions of Clarendon
www.broadviewpress.com /bvbooksprintable.asp?BookID=205   (598 words)

  
 World Encyclopedia: Clarendon, Constitutions of @ HighBeam Research   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
World Encyclopedia: Clarendon, Constitutions of @ HighBeam Research
Search for more information on HighBeam Research for.
Clarendon, Constitutions of (1164) Sixteen articles issued by Henry II of England to limit the temporal and judicial powers of the Church.
highbeam.com /doc/1O142:ClarendonConstitutionsof/Clarendon,+...   (103 words)

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