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Topic: Consumer goods in the Soviet Union


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In the News (Sun 21 Apr 19)

  
  Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Economy of the Soviet Union
According to Soviet reports, roughly 110 million Soviet workers took part in discussions in the final period of state planning in the late-1980s and early-1990s (even though such participation was mostly limited to a rubber-stamping of prepared statements during huge pre-staged meetings).
The Soviet Union became the world's leading producer of oil, coal, iron ore, and cement; manganese, gold, natural gas and other minerals were also of major importance.
Organized on a large scale and highly mechanized, the Soviet Union was one of the world's leading producers of cereals, although bad harvests (as in 1972 and 1975) necessitated imports and slowed the economy.
www.reference.com /browse/wiki/Economy_of_the_Soviet_Union   (2778 words)

  
  Union of Soviet Socialist Republics. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
Soviet industry was owned and managed by the state, and agricultural land was divided into state farms, collective farms, and small, privately held plots.
Soviet foreign policy, long hampered by the hostility of the nations of Europe and America and by pervasive mutual distrust, was carried out first by Georgi Chicherin and from 1930 by Maxim M. Litvinov.
In the technological race between the Soviet Union and the West (principally the United States), the USSR exploded (1953) a hydrogen bomb; announced (1957) the development of intercontinental ballistic missiles; orbited (1957) the first artificial earth satellite (called Sputnik); and in 1961 sent Yuri Gagarin in the first manned orbital flight.
www.bartleby.com /65/un/UnionSov.html   (5286 words)

  
 Soviet Union   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
Russia was by far the largest Republic in the Soviet Union, dominating in nearly all respects: land area, population, economic output, and political influence.
Soviet foreign policy played a major role determining the tenor of international relations for nearly four decades, and the Soviet Union had official relations with the majority of the nations of the world by the late 1980s.
As the Soviet Union achieved rough nuclear parity with the United States, Cold War superpower competition between the Soviet Union and the U.S. gave way to Détente and a more complicated pattern of international relations in which the world was no longer clearly split into two clearly opposed blocs in the 1960s and 1970s.
www.bidprobe.com /en/wikipedia/s/so/soviet_union.html   (1659 words)

  
 Consumer goods in the Soviet Union - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Group B was "Soviet consumer goods" (final goods used for consumption), including foods, clothing and shoes, housing, and such heavy-industry products as appliances and fuels that are used by individual consumers.
Although there was an effort to emphasize public consumption over private consumption in the Soviet Union, nevertheless households earned incomes that they could use for the purchase of consumer goods or for savings.
From the planners' viewpoint, it was necessary to balance the output of consumer goods and services with the flow of income to the population.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Consumer_goods_in_the_Soviet_Union   (1199 words)

  
 wikien.info: Main_Page   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
The Soviet Union forged the modern world's first centrally planned economy; and from a notably backward position at the time of the Bolshevik Revolution, the Soviet economy developed into the most powerful in the world after that of the United States.
The Soviet Union became the world's leading producer of oil, coal, iron ore, cement, and steel; manganese, gold, natural gas and other minerals were also of major importance.
Organized on a large scale and highly mechanized, the Soviet Union was one of the world's leading producers of cereals, although bad harvests (as in 1972 and 1975) necessitated imports and slowed the economy.
www.alanaditescili.net /index.php?title=Economy_of_the_Soviet_Union   (2425 words)

  
 History of the Soviet Union: Part II - InfoSearchPoint.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
The Soviet Union was officially established on November 30, 1922, and the Union was dissolved on December 26, 1991, by the Supreme Soviet (Supreme Council) of the USSR.
4 Perestroika, Glasnost, and the dissolution of the Soviet Union
Perestroika, Glasnost, and the dissolution of the Soviet Union
www.infosearchpoint.com /display/History_of_the_Soviet_Union:_Part_II   (5516 words)

  
 CONSUMER GOODS IN THE SOVIET UNION ALTERNATE GENIE SEARCH ENGINE, INC
Soviet planners fought a constant battle for the consumer goods balance throughout the Soviet era.
Although most Soviet officials agreed that ''perestroika'' was necessary and overdue, reforming the intricate industrial system had proved difficult.
Consumer goods targeted included radios, televisions, sewing_machines, washing_machines, refrigerators, paper, and knitwear.
www.agseinc.com /consumer_goods_in_the_Soviet_Union   (1138 words)

  
 The Soviet Union Disintegrates
In 1960 the Soviet Union was producing 12.5 percent of the world's goods (from farm and factory), just under half that of the United States (25.9 percent) and the European Economic Community (26 percent).
The Soviet Union's most outspoken dissident, Andrei Sakharov (the father of the Soviet Union's hydrogen bomb) was allowed to return to Moscow from the city of Gorky, where he had been exiled for speaking out against Soviet troops being sent to Afghanistan.
The economy in the Soviet Union was not a good argument for Soviet republics to stay in the Soviet Union.
www.fsmitha.com /h2/ch33.htm   (6856 words)

  
 Consumer goods in the Soviet Union - Definition, explanation
Group B was "Soviet consumer goods" (final goods used for consumption), including foods, clothing and shoes, housing, and such heavy-industry products as appliances and fuels that are used by individual consumers.
From the planners' viewpoint, it was necessary to balance the output of consumer goods and services with the flow of income to the population.
Soviet planners fought a constant battle for the consumer goods balance throughout the Soviet era.
www.calsky.com /lexikon/en/txt/c/co/consumer_goods_in_the_soviet_union.php   (1191 words)

  
 Russian Posters
The Soviet struggle for survival forced a return to symbolism that fanned the patriotic fires of the heartland.
Soviet posters are a relatively new area of collecting.
The themes of Soviet propaganda shifted dramatically as the Nazi threat grew.
www.internationalposter.com /ru-text.cfm   (2247 words)

  
 consumer goods in the soviet union - Information from Reference.com
There are no dictionary entries for consumer goods in the soviet union, but consumer, goods, in, the, soviet, union are spelled correctly.
In 1960 the Soviet Union was producing 12.5 percent of the world's goods (from
An overview of the institutional characteristics of the Soviet economy is...
dictionary.reference.com /search?q=consumer%20goods%20in%20the%20soviet%20union   (379 words)

  
 HISTORY OF POST-SOVIET RUSSIA FACTS AND INFORMATION
In the late 1980s, the Soviet Union devoted a quarter of its gross economic output to the defense sector (at the time most Western analysts believed that this figure was 15 percent).
Literacy was nearly universal, and the educational attainment level of the Soviet population was among the highest in the world with respect to science, engineering, and technical specialties (the USSR devoted little to what in the West would be described as "liberal_arts," though).
While the supply shortages of consumer goods characteristic of the 1980s went away (''see'' Consumer_goods_in_the_Soviet_Union), this was not only related to the opening of Russia's market to imports in the early 1990s but also to the impoverishment of the Russian people in the 1990s.
www.flowergods.com /History_of_post-Soviet_Russia   (8579 words)

  
 The Bureaucracy Problem   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
Thus the goods that the members of society deem most important are the ones that, without the need for any conscious bureaucratic direction, are first and most plentifully produced in a capitalist system.
It is not surprising that the quality of goods in the Soviet Union is notoriously low, the standard of living about one quarter to one-third of that of the U.S., and that many goods are in short supply.
The task of the Soviet planners is greatly simplified by the existence of the limited markets, but the fact that they are so limited means that the economy still operates inefficiently and suffers from two problems inherent in bureaucratic management: incessant bottlenecks and industrial autarky.
www.libertyhaven.com /theoreticalorphilosophicalissues/conservatism/bureaucracyproblem.html   (4340 words)

  
 Lehrstuhl für allgemeine Geschichte unter besonderen Berücksichtigung der
The main topic of the project is the emergence of mass tourism in the Soviet Union during the 1960's and 1970's.
Drawing on theoretical and methodological approaches of consumer history more generally, the project aims (1) to reconstruct the process of enlargement of touristic infrastructure and the quantitative development of travel and tourism, and (2) added to this, inquires into social and cultural dimensions of the specific Soviet variant of mass travel and tourism.
(1) The social and economical history of Soviet domestic tourism during the 1960's and 1970's, essentially the expansion of the tourist infrastructure by the trade unions and the Soviet enterprises, the distribution of tourist services and the problems this caused within the inflexible framework of planned economy.
www.uni-bielefeld.de /geschichte/osteuropa/fpnoack.html   (680 words)

  
 History_of_post-Soviet_Russia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
Russia was the largest of the fifteen republics that made up the Soviet Union, accounting for over 60 percent of the GDP and over half of the Soviet population.
While the supply shortages of consumer goods characteristic of the 1980s went away (see Consumer goods in the Soviet Union), this was not only related to the opening of Russia's market to imports in the early 1990s but also to the impoverishment of the Russian people in the 1990s.
In August 2000, the Soviet submarine Kursk suffered an explosion, causing the submarine to sink in the shallow area of the Barents Sea.
www.usedaudiparts.com /search.php?title=History_of_post-Soviet_Russia   (8803 words)

  
 [No title]
The collapse of Tsarist rule was followed by the eviction of the landlord class and the subdivision of land among peasant families.
After the death of the Soviet Union's revolutionary founding figure Vladimir Lenin (1924), Joseph Stalin finally emerged as the uncontested leader, defeating Leon Trotsky who he subsequently had exiled from the Soviet Union in 1929 and had murdered in
Their buying decisions, however, had relatively little influence on planning and shortages of in-demand consumer goods were common.
en-cyclopedia.com /wiki/Soviet_Union   (1515 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
Consumer goods were purchased exclusively with cash, so to understand the source of macroeconomic imbalance in the Soviet Union, we need to understand how the supply of cash was determined.
The later result is of particular importance for reform efforts in the former Soviet Union, for after years of forced saving, there exists a considerable stock of liquid wealth in the household sector, both in the form of deposits with Sperbank, and also cash hoards stuffed into jars and flower pots and dresser drawers.
Shortages of consumer goods intensified, lines at State stores grew even longer, and the inflation rate reached roughly 3 percent per week by late 1991.
vassun.vassar.edu /~kennett/Lieberman.htm   (3816 words)

  
 Russia
The Union of Soviet Socialist Republics was established as a federation on Dec. 30, 1922.
Trotsky was dismissed as commissar of war in 1925 and banished from the Soviet Union in 1929.
Soviet foreign policy, at first friendly toward Germany and antagonistic toward Britain and France and then, after Hitler's rise to power in 1933, becoming anti-Fascist and pro–League of Nations, took an abrupt turn on Aug. 24, 1939, with the signing of a nonaggression pact with Nazi Germany.
www.infoplease.com /ipa/A0107909.html   (3142 words)

  
 Perestroika [Sam Marcy]: Article 5 (1990)
In bourgeois accounts, the period in Soviet history from the end of World War II until the death of Stalin is made to appear as just one long night of repression and terror.
While Soviet society continues to have a shortage of consumer goods both in quality and quantity, this is precisely what the capitalist countries excel in, they say.
Even before the war was over, and just immediately after the tremendous Soviet victories at Stalingrad early in 1943 and in the Kursk area, there was a perceptible change in the tone of the capitalist press reports on the Soviet Union.
www.workers.org /marcy/cd/sampere/perehtml/5.htm   (2520 words)

  
 Industrialization and Population Change in the Baltic Republics
While the development of specialized industries serving All-Union markets has resulted in a close integration of the economies of the Baltic republics with that of the Soviet Union as a whole, the consumer needs of the local inhabitants have for the most part been ignored.
This is due to the fact that most of the small consumer goods in the Soviet Union are produced as auxiliary output in large specialized enterprises.
The Soviet leadership appears to have concluded that the best way to promote socialist internationalism is at the work place — and especially at major new construction projects where young people from all parts of the Soviet Union are brought together.
www.lituanus.org /1984_2/84_2_02.htm   (5221 words)

  
 USS Clueless - The Russian military
(The Soviet Union noticed very early that men serving near their homes were far more likely to desert.) Usually the physical conditions were beastly, with horrible weather and terrible food and dreadful buildings and a whole lot of not-very-much-fun.
Shortages of consumer goods in the Soviet Union are legendary.
That also meant that the Soviet officer corps had to be much more numerous, and they had to commission as much as 20% of their manpower just to keep enough officers on hand to handle anything even remotely technical.
www.denbeste.nu /cd_log_entries/2002/08/TheRussianmilitary.shtml   (4243 words)

  
 WHY DID THE SOVIET UNION COLLAPSE
The principal contradiction in the former Soviet Union was the encirclement by imperialism.
Estimates on the amount of the Soviet budget allocated to military expenditure vary considerably from 11% of GNP in the 1976-80 10th year plan, (Shaw and Pryce, 1990, p.144), to CIA estimates of 15% of GNP.
This was fatal because the limits of the Soviet economy as regards growth via extensive surplus value had been reached, and a move to the intensive accumulation of surplus value was necessary.
reality.gn.apc.org /polemic/whydid.htm   (3324 words)

  
 Ralph Graham: 2 Books on the Soviet Union (1946)
The Soviet economy, which was required to serve the needs of war, had developed in lopsided fashion under the five-year plans due to the fantastic disproportions inherent in the very plans themselves.
Soviet economy had not recovered from the awful consequences of Stalinist “planning” when the Nazis invaded the country and the debilitated industry was called upon to furnish the mechanical sinews of war and the needs of an army of many millions.
The degree of good or luxurious living depends upon the position of the individual in the hierarchy of the privileged, with the best naturally reserved for the ultra-privileged bureaucrats at the top of the social scale.
www.marxists.org /archive/glass/1946/08/ussr.htm   (4594 words)

  
 Socialism Today - The Rise and fall of Solidarnosc
This would have encouraged the working class of the Soviet Union, who had been disenfranchised and repressed by the Stalinist bureaucracy, to take back the power that was rightly theirs.
In the Soviet Union, the workers’ state established as a result of the October revolution degenerated as the Stalinists consolidated their hold on power.
In the Soviet Union, the anarchist KAS-KOR and the Marxist Party of the Dictatorship of the Proletariat, each with several thousand activists, propagated the theory of state capitalism, promoting the idea that the establishment of the ‘free market’ would be progressive.
www.socialismtoday.org /63/solidarnosc.html   (3483 words)

  
 Asia Times Online - The trusted source for news on Central Asia
Kalashnikov's vision of USSR-2 is a version of an unrealized scenario for the reform of the Soviet Union that dates back to the early 1980s and that is attributed to then KGB director Yurii Andropov.
He argues that Russia cannot become a cheap producer of consumer goods because it does not have a cheap labor force, inexpensive and accessible natural resources, or convenient means of transporting manufactured goods to world markets.
As for geographic expansion, Kalashnikov argues that it should not be necessary to repeat the experience of the Soviet Union.
www.atimes.com /atimes/Central_Asia/FH06Ag02.html   (1479 words)

  
 List of Soviet Union-related topics - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
This is so that those interested in the subject can monitor changes to the pages by clicking on Related changes in the sidebar.
History of the Jews in Russia and Soviet Union
Military Collegium of the Supreme Court of the USSR
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/List_of_Soviet_Union-related_topics   (161 words)

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