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Topic: Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms


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  Human rights - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Human rights refers to the concept of human beings as having universal rights, or status, regardless of legal jurisdiction or other localizing factors, such as ethnicity and nationality.
The term "human rights" has replaced the term "natural rights" in popularity, because the rights are less and less frequently seen as requiring natural law for their existence.
Human rights have historically arisen from the need to protect citizens from abuse by the state and this might suggest that all mankind has a duty to intervene and protect people wherever they are.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Human_rights   (3856 words)

  
 University of Minnesota Human Rights Library
Reaffirming their profound belief in those fundamental freedoms which are the foundation of justice and peace in the world and are best maintained on the one hand by an effective political democracy and on the other by a common understanding and observance of the human rights upon which they depend;
2 Freedom to manifest one's religion or beliefs shall be subject only to such limitations as are prescribed by law and are necessary in a democratic society in the interests of public safety, for the protection of public order, health or morals, or for the protection of the rights and freedoms of others.
Nothing in this Convention may be interpreted as implying for any State, group or person any right to engage in any activity or perform any act aimed at the destruction of any of the rights and freedoms set forth herein or at their limitation to a greater extent than is provided for in the Convention.
www1.umn.edu /humanrts/instree/z17euroco.html   (4750 words)

  
 Human Rights
Examples of human rights are the right to freedom of religion, the right to a fair trial when charged with a crime, the right not to be tortured, and the right to engage in political activity.
A human right can exist as a shared norm of actual human moralities, as a justified moral norm supported by strong reasons, as a legal right at the national level (here it might be referred to as a "civil" or "constitutional" right), or as a legal right within international law.
Rawls says that human rights "specify limits to a regime's internal autonomy" and that "their fulfillment is sufficient to exclude justified and forceful intervention by other peoples, for example, by diplomatic and economic sanctions, or in grave cases by military force" (Rawls 1999, 79-80).
plato.stanford.edu /entries/rights-human   (11728 words)

  
 Freedom of speech   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-12)
Freedom of speech is often regarded as an integral concept in modern liberal democracies, where it is understood to outlaw government censorship.
Finally, the government restricts the right of broadcasting to authorized radio and television channels; the authorizations are granted by an independent administrative authority; this authority has recently removed the broadcasting authorizations of Some foreign channels because of their antisemitic content.
The constitutional provision that guarantees Freedom of expression in Canada is section 2(b) of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.
freedom-of-speech.iqnaut.net   (4236 words)

  
 Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms
Everyone has the right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion; this right includes freedom to change his religion or belief and freedom, either alone or in community with others and in public or private, to manifest his religion or belief, in worship, teaching, practice and observance.
Freedom to manifest one's religion or beliefs shall be subject only to such limitations as are prescribed by law and are necessary in a democratic society in the interests of public safety, for the protection of public order, health or morals, or for the protection of the rights and freedoms of others.
Protocol to the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms of 4 November 1950
www.selfregulation.info /cocon/echr-txt.htm   (6777 words)

  
 European Convention on Human Rights and its Five Protocols
The Convention may be denounced in accordance with the provisions of the preceding paragraphs in respect of any territory to which it has been declared to extend under the terms Article 63.
Considering that it is advisable to amend certain provisions of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms signed at rome on 4 November 1950 (hereinafter referred to as 'the Convention') concerning the procedure of the European Commission of Human Rights,
The rights set forth in paragraph 1 may also be subject, in particular areas, to restrictions imposes in accordance with law and justified by the public interest in a democratic society.
www.hri.org /docs/ECHR50.html   (6526 words)

  
 Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-12)
Her Majesty`s Government have considered the extension of the European Convention on Human Rights to those territories for whose international relations they are responsible and in which that Convention would be applicable.
In accordance with the provisions of Article 63 of the Convention, Her Majesty`s Government in the United Kingdom declare that the European Convention on Human Rights signed in Rome on the 4th November 1950 shall extend to those territories on the enclosed list for whose international relations they are responsible.
I have the honour to refer to Article 63 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms, under which the Convention was extended to Brunei on 12 September 1967.
www.law.qub.ac.uk /humanrts/treaties/texts/uk4.html   (1601 words)

  
 Protocol No. 6 to the 1950 European Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms, E.T.S. 114, ...
Protocol No. 6 to the 1950 European Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms, E.T.S. 114, entered into force March 1, 1985.
No reservation may be made under Article 64 of the Convention in respect of the provisions of this Protocol (4).
As between the State Parties the provisions of Articles 1 to 5 of this Protocol shall be regarded as additional articles to the Convention and all the provisions of the Convention shall apply accordingly.
www1.umn.edu /humanrts/euro/z25prot6.html   (628 words)

  
 Linguistic Rights - European Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-12)
Linguistic Rights - European Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms
The European Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms was adopted by the Council of Europe on 4 November 1950.
The full text version of the European Convention on Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms can be found on the Internet site of the Council of Europe.
www.unesco.org /most/lnlaw12.htm   (220 words)

  
 HUMANLEX - Regional Organizations
Protocol to the Convention for the protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms
Additional Protocol to the American Convention on Human Rights in the Area of Economic, Social and Cultural Rights "Protocol of San Salvador"
Protocol to the American Convention on Human Rights to abolish death penalty
humanlex.tripod.com /English/Eor.htm   (318 words)

  
 PROTOCOL No. 11 TO THE CONVENTION FOR THE PROTECTION OF HUMAN RIGHTS AND FUNDAMENTAL FREEDOMS   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-12)
Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms, signed at Rome on 4 November 1950 (hereinafter referred to as "the
2.Section I of the Convention shall be entitled "Rights and freedoms" and new Section III of the Convention shall be
Convention at the date of entry into force of this Protocol shall be completed by the Committee of Ministers
www.bild.net /protoc11.htm   (3856 words)

  
 [No title]
Protocol No. 13 to the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms, concerning the abolition of the death penalty in all circumstances
Optional protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the involvement of children in armed conflict
Protocol Additional to the Geneva Conventions of 12 August 1949, and relating to the Protection of Victims of International Armed Conflicts (Protocol I) Protocol Additional to the Geneva Conventions of 12 August 1949, and relating to the Protection of Victims of Non-International Armed Conflicts (Protocol II)
www.humanrights.ge /eng/documents.shtml   (944 words)

  
 Global Connections: Canadian Involvement in World Organizations   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-12)
Amnesty International is a worldwide campaigning movement that works to promote all the human rights enshrined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and other international standards.
In particular, Amnesty International campaigns to free all prisoners of conscience; ensure fair and prompt trials for political prisoners; abolish the death penalty, torture and other cruel treatment of prisoners; end political killings and "disappearances"; and oppose human rights abuses by opposition groups.
The purposes of the United Nations are to maintain international peace and security; to develop friendly relations among nations; to cooperate in solving international economic, social, cultural and humanitarian problems and in promoting respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms; and to be a centre for harmonizing the actions of nations in attaining these ends.
www.aresearchguide.com /global.html   (1670 words)

  
 Council of Europe - (ETS No.5) European Convention on Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-12)
Council of Europe - (ETS No.5) European Convention on Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms
For the purpose of this article the term "forced or compulsory labour" shall not include:
Section II – European Court of Human Rights
www.hri.ca /partners/forob/e/docs/EuroConv.htm   (4481 words)

  
 [No title]
Convention for the protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (ETS No. 005) as amended by Protocol No. 11 (ETS No. 155) of 11 May 1994,
- Protocol No. 11 to the Convention for the protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (ETS No. 155) of 11 May 1994.
Framework Convention for the Protection of National Minorities (ETS No. 157)
www.fortunecity.com /greenfield/tree/108/ra199989.html   (529 words)

  
 Stiftelsen Stockholm Institute for Scandinavian Law   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-12)
European Court of Human Rights and Council of Europe Convention on the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms also EcoHR
International Convention on Liability and Compensation for Damage in Connection with the Carriage of Hazardous and Noxious Substances by Sea
Convention Governing the Specific Aspects of the Refugee Problems in Africa, adopted by OAU 1969
sisl.juridicum.su.se /tom.php?page=legalabb.html   (3749 words)

  
 Protocol No. 6 to the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms concerning the abolition ...
Protocol No. 6 to the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms concerning the abolition of the death penalty, as amended by Protocol No. 11
The member States of the Council of Europe, signatory to this Protocol to the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms, signed at Rome on 4 November 1950 (hereinafter referred to as "the Convention"),
Enter your email address to receive HREA's quarterly newsletter.
www.hrea.org /feature-events/protocol6_en.html   (746 words)

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