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Topic: Convention on Biological Diversity


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In the News (Thu 23 May 19)

  
  SCADPlus: The Rio de Janeiro Convention on biological diversity   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
The Community approves the Convention on Biological Diversity, which seeks to anticipate, prevent and attack the causes of significant reduction or loss of biological diversity at source because of its intrinsic value and because of its ecological, genetic, social, economic, scientific, educational, cultural, recreational and aesthetic value.
The Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) was signed by the Community and all the Member States at the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development in Rio de Janeiro from 3 to 14 June 1992.
The CBD is designed to conserve biological diversity, ensure the sustainable use of this diversity and share the benefits generated by the use of genetic resources, in particular through appropriate access to genetic resources and appropriate transfer of relevant technologies, taking into account all rights over those resources and technologies, and through adequate funding.
europa.eu.int /scadplus/leg/en/lvb/l28102.htm   (1405 words)

  
 A Brief Introduction to the UN Convention on Biological Diversity   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
The Convention on Biological Diversity was negotiated under the auspices of the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP).
The Informal Consultations regarding the Resumed Session of the Extraordinary Meeting Of The Conference of the Parties (ExCOP) for the Adoption of the Protocol on Biosafety to the Convention on Biological Diversity met in Vienna, Austria, from Wednesday, 15 September to Sunday, 19 September 1999.
The Resumed Session of the Extraordinary Meeting of the Conference of the Parties (ExCOP) for the Adoption of the Protocol on Biosafety to the Convention on Biological Diversity was held from 24-28 January 2000, in Montréal, Canada.
www.iisd.ca /biodiv/cbdintro.html   (1719 words)

  
 Convention on Biological Diversity   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
The Convention on Biological Diversity, signed in 1992 at the Rio Earth Summit and in force since 1994, is the first global instrument to address all the aspects of biological diversity: genetic resources, species and ecosystems.
The Convention recognises that the conservation of biological diversity is "a common concern of humankind" and promotes a partnership among countries in matters such as scientific and technical co-operation, access to financial and genetic resources and transfer of ecologically sound technologies.
The Convention emphasises that the authority to determine access to genetic resources rests with national government and is subject to national legislation.
www.iucn.org /bookstore/readingroom/conven/cvcbd.html   (475 words)

  
 WWF Freshwater Programme / Convention on Biological Diversity   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Biological diversity - or biodiversity - is the term given to the variety of life on Earth and the natural patterns it forms.
This diversity is often understood in terms of the wide variety of plants, animals and microorganisms.
The Convention establishes three main goals: the conservation of biological diversity, the sustainable use of its components, and the fair and equitable sharing of the benefits from the use of genetic resources.
www.panda.org /about_wwf/what_we_do/freshwater/our_solutions/policies_practices/conferences_events/cbd.cfm   (422 words)

  
 Convention on Biological Diversity
"Biological diversity" means the variability among living organisms from all sources including, inter alia, terrestrial, marine and other aquatic ecosystems and the ecological complexes of which they are part; this includes diversity within species, between species and of ecosystems.
The annexes to this Convention or to any protocol shall form an integral part of the Convention or of such protocol, as the case may be, and, unless expressly provided otherwise, a reference to this Convention or its protocols constitutes at the same time a reference to any annexes thereto.
This Convention and any protocol shall be open for accession by States and by regional economic integration organizations from the date on which the Convention or the protocol concerned is closed for signature.
www.isu.ru /insts/botsad/cbd/cbd_eng.htm   (7713 words)

  
 Biodiversity Details, Meaning Biodiversity Article and Explanation Guide
The term biological diversity, was coined by Thomas Lovejoy in 1980, while the word biodiversity itself, was coined by the entomologist E.O. Wilson in 1986, in a report for the first American Forum on biological diversity organized by the National Research Council (NRC).
For geneticists, biodiversity is the diversity of genes and organisms.
The Convention on Biodiversity spirit implies a prior informed consent between the source country and the collector, to establish which resource will be used and for what, and to settle on a fair agreement on benefit sharing.
www.e-paranoids.com /b/bi/biodiversity.html   (2763 words)

  
 Final: The Convention on Biological Diversity and Indigenous Peoples
Biological diversity, or biodiversity, is generally defined as the number and variety of species on the planet (Raustiala 1997; UNEP 1999a).
The objectives of the Convention are stated as, "the conservation of biological diversity, the sustainable use of its components and the fair and equitable sharing of the benefits arising out of the utilization of genetic resources" (UNEP 1992).
The Convention on Biological Diversity and agriculture: implications and unresolved debates.
jrscience.wcp.muohio.edu /FieldCourses00/PapersCostaRicaArticles/Final.TheConventiononBiol.html   (3122 words)

  
 Multilateral treaties deposited with the Secretary-General- TREATY I-XXVII--34.asp   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Note: The Convention was adopted by the Intergovernmental Negotiating Committee for a Convention on Biological Diversity, during its Fifth session, held at Nairobi from 11 to 22 May 1992.
The Convention was open for signature at Rio de Janeiro by all States and regional economic integration organizations from 5 June 1992 until 14 June 1992, and remained open at the United Nations Headquarters in New York until 4 June 1993.
The Government of Chile, on ratifying the Convention on Biological Diversity of 1992, wishes to place on record that the pine tree and other species that the country exploits as one of its forestry resources are considered exotic and are not taken to fall within the scope of the Convention.
untreaty.un.org /ENGLISH/bible/englishinternetbible/partI/chapterXXVII/treaty34.asp   (1764 words)

  
 Convention on Biological Diversity
Use of Terms For the purposes of this Convention: "Biological diversity" means the variability among living organisms from all sources including, inter alia, terrestrial, marine and other aquatic ecosystems and the ecological complexes of which they are part; this includes diversity within species, between species and of ecosystems.
Signature This Convention shall be open for signature at Rio de Janeiro by all States and any regional economic integration organization from 5 June 1992 until 14 June 1992, and at the United Nations Headquarters in New York from 15 June 1992 to 4 June 1993.
Ecosystems and habitats: containing high diversity, large numbers of endemic or threatened species, or wilderness; required by migratory species; of social, economic, cultural or scientific importance; or, which are representative, unique or associated with key evolutionary or other biological processes; 2.
www.ciesin.org /docs/008-589/008-589.html   (5079 words)

  
 Convention on Biological Diversity
The aims of the CBD are ‘the conservation of biological diversity, the sustainable use of its components, and the fair and equitable sharing of the benefits arising out of the utilization of genetic resources’.
The Convention is thus the first global comprehensive agreement to address all aspects of biological diversity: genetic resources, species and ecosystems.
But much more important than these links between UNESCO and the Convention on Biological Diversity is the framework and encouragement that the CBD has provided to countries in the development of their own national biodiversity strategies and action plans.
portal.unesco.org /en/ev.php-URL_ID=3500&URL_DO=DO_TOPIC&URL_SECTION=201.html   (522 words)

  
 Extracted from: The Convention on Biological Diversity and the Agreement On Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual ...
The objectives of the Convention on Biological Diversity are: the conservation of biological diversity; the sustainable use of its components; and the fair and equitable sharing of the benefits arising out of the use of genetic resources (Article 1).
At the national level, the Convention's language would encompass a variety of approaches to the treatment of IPR within frameworks for controlling both the access to and the benefit-sharing of genetic resources under the Convention, as long as these approaches are consistent with the counterpoised provisions of paragraphs 2 and 5 of Article 16.
A large and growing number of countries are both Parties to the Convention and members of the WTO (156 Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity as of 4 November 1996; 125 members of the WTO as of 23 October 1996).
ukabc.org /TRIPs/intro_CBD.htm   (3894 words)

  
 Convention on Biological Diversity   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
The Convention on Biological Diversity represents the first comprehensive international statement on the importance of biodiveristy.
The goals of this agreement include: the conservation of biological diversity, the sustainable use of its components, and the fair and equitable sharing of the benefits arising out of the utilization of genetic resources." This treaty focuses on sustainable development at the international level, as a way to achieve economic and environmental goals concurrently.
This convention recognizes the importance of conserving biological diversity for present and future generations.
www.spea.indiana.edu /kenricha/biodiversity/cbd.htm   (415 words)

  
 Convention on Biological Diversity   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
The Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) is governed by a Conference of the Parties (COP) made up of all the Parties to the Convention.
The Convention on Biological Diversity affirms that conservation of biodiversity is a common concern of humankind and reaffirms that nations have sovereign rights over their own biological resources.
The Convention covers both terrestrial and marine biota, and Parties are explicitly required to implement the CBD consistent with the rights and obligations of States under the law of the sea.
www.nmfs.noaa.gov /pr/PR/cbdsummary.html   (676 words)

  
 Agenda for Change - Convention on Biological Diversity   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
The world’s biological diversity— the variability among living organisms— is valuable for ecological, genetic, social, economic, scientific, educational, cultural, recreational and aesthetic reasons.
However, biological diversity is being significantly reduced by certain human activities, and it is vital to anticipate, prevent and attack the causes of this loss.
Countries have rights over their biological resources, but they are also responsible for conserving their biological diversity and for using their biological resources in a sustainable manner.
www.iisd.org /rio+5/agenda/biodiversity.htm   (719 words)

  
 SD: Knowledge : FAO and the Biosafety Protocol to the Convention on Biological Diversity
FAO and the Biosafety Protocol to the Convention on Biological Diversity
The Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety was adopted by the Conference of the Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity as a supplementary agreement to the Convention on 29 January 2000.
The Protocol seeks to protect biological diversity from the potential risks posed by living modified organisms resulting from modern biotechnology, and establishes an advanced informed agreement (AIA) procedure for ensuring that countries are provided with the information necessary to make informed decisions before agreeing to the import of such organisms into their territory.
www.fao.org /WAICENT/faoinfo/sustdev/RTdirect/rtre0034.htm   (1867 words)

  
 IELRC.ORG - The Convention on Biological Diversity
Its three main goals are the conservation of biological diversity, the sustainable use of its components[1], and the fair and equitable sharing of the benefits derived from the use of genetic resources[2].
The Convention reaffirms the cornerstone principle of state sovereignty over resources which grant states sovereign rights to exploit their own resources pursuant to their own environmental policies together with the responsibility to ensure that activities within their own jurisdiction or control do not cause damage to the environment of other states.
It introduces the notion that the conservation of biological diversity is a ‘common concern of humankind’ whereby states have a duty to cooperate in the sustainable management of resources found under their jurisdiction.
www.ielrc.org /content/f0301.htm   (1849 words)

  
 Convention on Biological Diversity
The Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) was signed in 1992 at the 1992 UN Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED) in Rio de Janeiro and ratified in 1993.
The CBD is a comprehensive, binding agreement covering the use and conservation of biodiversity.
The CBD already enjoys close cooperation with the Cartagena Convention in the Caribbean and the Permanent Commission for the South Pacific (CPPS) in the South-East Pacific.
www.unep.ch /regionalseas/legal/cbd.htm   (356 words)

  
 [No title]
We will remember her for the passion of her work, for her commitment to addressing the impacts of climate change on biological diversity and for her warmth and attention to the needs of the people with whom she worked.
As head of the Secretariat of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, she provided important and enthusiastic support for increased collaboration between the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification and the Convention on Biological Diversity.
Issued by the Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity, Notifications serve to inform Parties, stakeholders and the interested public on activities, meetings and events organized or announced by the Secretariat.
www.biodiv.org   (558 words)

  
 treaty-biodiversity
The Convention on Biological Diversity, commonly referred to as the Biodiversity Treaty, was one of two major treaties opened for signature at the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED) in 1992.
A "Brief History of the Convention on Biological Diversity" is presented in the Earth Negotiations Bulletin (Bernstein et al.
Coughlin (1993) discusses the implications of the agreement for the Biodiversity Treaty in "Using the Merck-INBio Agreement to Clarify the Convention on Biological Diversity." The article outlines treaty provisions considered controversial, especially to developed countries, and examines how Merck's agreement may remove perceived ambiguities in these provisions.
www.ciesin.org /TG/PI/TREATY/bio.html   (632 words)

  
 Convention on Biological Diversity - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Convention on Biological Diversity is an international treaty that was adopted at the Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro in 1992.
It is often seen as the key document regarding sustainable development.
Objective - to develop national strategies for the conservation and sustainable use of biological diversity
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Convention_on_Biological_Diversity   (157 words)

  
 About the Convention on Biological Diversity
Ratified by 187 countries the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) represents the first united effort by governments to address the rate at which the world's natural resources are being degraded and destroyed.
The Convention sets overall goals and policies to tackle common problems and organizes technical and financial cooperation to implement them.
Under the CBD, developed countries also take on the responsibility of providing funding to developing nations to support their implementation of the Convention.
panda.org /about_wwf/what_we_do/policy/policy_and_events/cbd/index.cfm   (175 words)

  
 World Conservation Monitoring Centre - CBD   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
The International Day for Biological Diversity, 29 December 1996, marked the entry into force, three years ago, of the Convention on Biological Diversity.
The Convention is the centrepiece of the international community's efforts to protect and sustainably use some of the earth's greatest riches--the diversity of life including genes, species, and ecosystems.
The third meeting of the Conference of the Parties held in Buenos Aires in November 1996 adopted a number of major decisions that expanded the scope of activities under the Convention and launched new initiatives on forest biological diversity, agricultural biological diversity and indigenous knowledge.
www.wcmc.org.uk /latenews/cbd.htm   (850 words)

  
 Convention on Biological Diversity / Introduction   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Its objective is to ensure the conservation of Biological Diversity and the sustainable use of its components.
The Convention entered into force in December 1993 and by April 1998, 173 parties had signed up to the Convention, with 12 signatories yet to ratify the agreement.
The COP is responsible for reviewing the implementation of the Convention, whilst the parties are obligated to present reports of measures taken in the implementation of the Convention.
www.earthsummit2002.org /toolkits/women/un-doku/otherun/biodiv.htm   (570 words)

  
 Biological diversity
The Convention on Biodiversity (CBD) is an international treaty that was drawn up in Rio de Janeiro at the UN Conference on Environment and Development (Earth Summit 1992
Nations that have ratified the convention or are otherwise parties to the protocol followed this intial meeting with others, 'Conference of Parties' or COP 1-5, the last one was held in 2000.
The CBD seeks to ensure that future profits made through the exploitation of biodiversity will be shared with the nations where the organisms originated.
life.bio.sunysb.edu /ee/geeta/CBD101.html   (786 words)

  
 Events - Nature Conservancy Lends Support to Seventh Convention on Biological Diversity
An historic set of agreements was signed at this Earth Summit, including two binding agreements: the Convention on Climate Change and the Convention on Biological Diversity, which is the first global agreement on the conservation and sustainable use of biological diversity.
The Convention has three stated objectives: 1) conserving biodiversity, 2) using the components of biodiversity in a sustainable manner and 3) fairly and equitably sharing the benefits arising from genetic resources.
The Convention requires that each government develop a strategy and a plan of action for the conservation and sustainable use of biodiversity.
nature.org /event/events/events2045.html   (1104 words)

  
 The Convention on Biological Diversity
The Proposed Joint Work Plan was endorsed by the 4th Conference of the Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity, Bratislava, Slovak Republic, May 1998 in Decision IV/15 of COP4, which also recommended it as a model for future cooperative arrangements.
The 4th Conference of the Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity met in Bratislava, Slovak Republic from 4 to 15 May 1998.
Here are some of the other documents concerning the Ramsar Convention that emanated from the 4th Conference of the Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity.
www.ramsar.org /index_cbd.htm   (820 words)

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