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Topic: Convention on the International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Flora and Fauna


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In the News (Wed 20 Mar 19)

  
  Exotic pet - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Convention on the International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Flora and Fauna, or CITES, moderates the trade of exotic pets around the world, to prevent any threats to their survival and ecological damage.
Alligators, wolves and wolf/dog hybrids, fennec foxes, wild cat cubs (lions, tigers, ocelots, etc.), snakes, tortoises, spiders, scorpions, rare birds and non-human primates are among the species kept as pets.
Some exotics are less "wild" than others; dingoes have been in a relationship with humans for generations, and the Bengal cat descends from a hybrid of wild and domestic species.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Exotic_pet   (800 words)

  
 Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES)
In 1975 an international convention was established to prevent international trade from threatening species with extinction.
This treaty is known as the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES).
These are species that any CITES Party identifies as being subject to regulation within its jurisdiction for the purpose of preventing or restricting exploitation and that require the cooperation of other countries in the control of trade.
www.deh.gov.au /biodiversity/trade-use/cites   (1351 words)

  
 CITES: The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora
CITES is the acronym for the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora.
Many wildlife species in trade are not endangered, but the existence of an agreement to ensure the sustainability of the trade is important in order to safeguard these resources for the future.
Wild flora and fauna continually undergo scrutiny by CITES and, every year, proposals to modify the status of certain species, include new species, and define distinctions are reviewed and acted upon.
www.peteducation.com /article.cfm?cls=15&cat=1794&articleid=2052   (1045 words)

  
 Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES)
One of the earliest international environmental treaties adopted was the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), which seeks to ensure that international trade does not threaten the survival of any species of wild animal or plant.
In early 1973, the United States convened a conference at the Department of State with 88 participating countries to negotiate a convention to control international trade in threatened species.
Known to many as the "Washington Convention," CITES was signed by 21 countries in March 1973 and deposited with the Swiss government.
www.state.gov /g/oes/rls/fs/2002/14871.htm   (374 words)

  
 CONVENTION ON INTERNATIONAL TRADE IN ENDANGERED SPECIES OF WILD FAUNA AND FLORA (1973)
Trade in specimens of these species must be subject to particularly strict regulation in order not to endanger further their survival and must only be authorized in exceptional circumstances.
This Convention shall be open for accession by regional economic integration organizations constituted by sovereign States which have competence in respect of the negotiation, conclusion and implementation of international agreements in matters transferred to them by their Member States and covered by this Convention.
Species included in these appendices are referred to: a) by the name of the species; or b) as being all of the species included in a higher taxon or designated part thereof.
sedac.ciesin.org /entri/texts/cites.trade.endangered.species.1973.html   (5452 words)

  
 Select Committee on Heritage and the Irish Language - default 011113
The purpose of the meeting is to consider the approval of the terms of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Flora and Fauna, as amended.
The convention aims to control international trade in certain species of wild animals and plants where this trade threatens these species with global extinction.
The convention was amended at Bonn in 1979 to provide the legal basis for contributions towards the running costs of the convention.
www.irlgov.ie /Committees-01/c-heritage/011113   (2721 words)

  
 KOOPOWITZ   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-24)
When flower species on sale in the bulb market were first tallied it was clear that no distinction was made between domesticated and propagated species and wild species.
They neglect the fact that all domesticated plants have their roots in wild species and that the species are the basic building blocks for creating new kinds of flowers.
Consequently in Australia trade in Paphopoedilum delenatii, which has not been collected in the wild for over 50 years, was also banned despite the fact that there are hundreds of thousands of artificially propagated plants in cultivation, all of which were derived from a single specimen collected decades ago.
www.bulbsociety.org /About_Bulbs/CONSERVATION/Koopowitz/KOOPOWITZ.html   (537 words)

  
 CITES, Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora
Its aim is to ensure that international trade in specimens of wild animals and plants does not threaten their survival.
Because the trade in wild animals and plants crosses borders between countries, the effort to regulate it requires international cooperation to safeguard certain species from over-exploitation.
The text of the Convention was finally agreed at a meeting of representatives of 80 countries in Washington DC., United States of America, on March 3, 1973, and on July 1, 1975 CITES entered in force.
www.tigerhomes.org /animal/curriculums/cities-pc.cfm   (389 words)

  
 Washingtoner Artenschutzabkommen CITES - CITES and the EU   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-24)
The decline and extinction of species is a natural process in the evolution of life on earth, and there have been several periods of mass extinctions in the prehistoric past.
International cooperation is vital if such trade in endangered species or their derivatives is to be effectively controlled, and both producer and consumer countries have their share in the responsibility for trade control.
CITES (Convention on the International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Flora and Fauna) was drafted as a result of a resolution adopted in 1963 at a meeting of members of IUCN (The World Conservation Union).
www.artenschutz.at /article/archive/8107   (648 words)

  
 Biological Diversity in Food and Agriculture
The linkages between international agricultural trade and environmental sustainability are an important topic of debate at the ongoing negotiations on agriculture.
Since the entrance into force of the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) in 1993, countries that ratified the Convention have been legally bound to a commitment that aims to ensure the conservation and sustainable use of biological diversity, and the equitable sharing of its benefits.
The International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture is an important international instrument governing the conservation and sustainable utilisation of agricultural biodiversity.
www.fao.org /biodiversity/Trade_en.asp   (309 words)

  
 What's At Stake: International Sea Turtle Protection Bill Needs Your Help
Furthermore, under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Flora and Fauna (CITES), international trade of all seven species is prohibited.
Like the multinational species bills enacted to date, H.R. 3378 should be very successful in building partnerships and leveraging millions of dollars from private and other sources of funding to support projects critical to species conservation.
The species is on the brink of extinction in the Pacific.
actionnetwork.org /campaign/turtlebill/explanation   (674 words)

  
 WWF | Wildlife Trade | CITES
Its purpose is to ensure that no species of wild fauna or flora becomes or remains subject to unsustainable exploitation because of international trade.
A listing on Appendix II means that a species is threatened by trade, such as many parrots and corals, and cannot be internationally traded unless member countries ensure that the trade is sustainable through monitoring and regulations.
CITES also monitors the sustainability of trade in species that may not be endangered, but that are important parts of the planet's resources for the future.
www.worldwildlife.org /trade/cites/about.cfm   (370 words)

  
 CITES - Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora
CITES - Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora
The Convention seeks to control the trade in species of wild animals and plants that are, or may be, threatened with extinction as a result of international trade.
Species in Appendix II are not currently threatened, but may become so if their trade is not controlled.
www.ec.gc.ca /international/multilat/specie_e.htm   (653 words)

  
 Species of wild flora and fauna that are economically capitalized   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-24)
Species of wild flora and fauna that are economically capitalized
Species of wild fauna of a cynegetical interest add to these, and are capitalized through hunting, as well as the species of fish from the natural waters, which are capitalized through commercial, sport and leisure fishing.
Great carnivora species, such as the wolf, the lynx and the wildcat, all of which are strictly protected, dwell in the mountain area.
enrin.grida.no /htmls/romania/soe2000/eng/cap5/specii.htm   (752 words)

  
 Thailand bird Trade
The Issue The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Flora and Fauna (CITES) was negotiated with a view to curbing abusive trade in endangered species.
Many of the commonly traded species were not protected by this legislation, despite their being listed in the CITES Appendices, including: the water monitor, Varanus salvator, the clouded monitor, Varanus bengalensis (Appendix II) the Saltwater Crocodile, Crocodylus porasus, and the Siamese Crocodile, Crocodylus siamensis (Appendix I).
Relevant Literature Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora 27 UST 108, TIAS 8249 (1973).
www.american.edu /projects/mandala/TED/THAIBIRD.HTM   (1946 words)

  
 Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES, 1973)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-24)
Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES, 1973)
The CITES Convention was initiated at an IUCN General Assembly in 1963 and concluded at Washington in 1973.
The objectives of CITES are to protect endangered plant and animal species from illegal trade and over-exploitation by means of a system of import and export permits for the regulation of trade.
europa.eu.int /comm/development/body/theme/environment/env_integ/env_integration/envman-1598.html   (330 words)

  
 Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (Washington, 3 March 1973) [1976] ATS 29
Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (Washington, 3 March 1973) [1976] ATS 29
Article IV Regulation of trade in specimens of species included in Appendix II All trade in specimens of species included in Appendix II shall be in accordance with the provisions of this Article.
To the extent and in the manner he considers appropriate, he may be assisted by suitable inter-governmental or non-governmental international or national agencies and bodies technically qualified in protection, conservation and management of wild fauna and flora.
www.austlii.edu.au /au/other/dfat/treaties/1976/29.html   (5908 words)

  
 CITIES   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-24)
The need for international cooperation to eliminate trade in illegally obtained animals and plants existed for many years and is of great concern to developing nations in Africa, South America and the Far East.
Before trade is commenced, the importer must be in possession of a Convention export permit issued by the government of the exporting nation and an import permit issued by the Canadian Wildlife Service.
The species being traded must be covered by appropriate Convention export permits issued by the government of the exporting nations before entry to Canada will be permitted.
www2.hawaii.edu /~delbeek/delb6.html   (778 words)

  
 WWF - Factsheet: illegal and unsustainable wildlife trade
Each year, hundreds of millions of plants and animals are caught or harvested from the wild and then sold as food, pets, ornamental plants, leather, tourist curios, and medicine.
While a great deal of this trade is legal and is not harming wild populations, a worryingly large proportion is illegal - and threatens the survival of many endangered species.
Above all, the aim is to encourage sustainability in wildlife trade - by informing all those involved, including the general public, about the environmental harm that illegal and unsustainable wildlife trade can cause, and by providing guidance and support to counteract it.
www.panda.org /news_facts/education/university/conservation_repository/factsheets/index.cfm?uNewsID=63000   (227 words)

  
 Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora Convention on International Trade in ...
All trade in specimens of species included in Appendix III shall be in accordance with the provisions of this Article.
The export of any specimen of a species included in Appendix III from any State which has included that species in Appendix III shall require the prior grant and presentation of an export permit.
The import of any specimen of a species included in Appendix III shall require, except in circumstances to which paragraph 4 of this Article applies, the prior presentation of a certificate of origin and, where the import is from a State which has included that species in Appendix III, an export permit.
law-ref.org /CITES/articleV.html   (269 words)

  
 2.3 The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species, 1973: Regulating the Hunting Industry in Tanzania
The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) is another international wildlife conservation and management instrument whose scope extends to the hunting industry.
The main objectives of this Convention are focused at preventing international trade from threatening the survival of species of wild fauna and flora from extinction.
It is clear from the foregoing that the regulations made under Tanzania's main wildlife law re-echo the directives of the CITES by controlling, regulating and restricting the hunting of endangered wild animal species for purposes of engaging in their trade.
www.leat.or.tz /publications/regulating.hunting/2.3.end.species.convention.php   (566 words)

  
 International Economic Instruments
Convention for the Pacific Settlement of International Disputes 1 Bevans 577; 36 Stat.
Convention on the Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Arbitral Awards (New York, 1958) 330 UNTS 38; 21 UST 2517; entered into force June 7, 1959.
Convention on the Settlement by Arbitration of Civil Law Disputes Resulting from Relations of Economic and Scientific Technical Cooperation (Moscow Convention) 890 UNTS 167, entered into force January 1, 1973.
www.ll.georgetown.edu /intl/iiel/instruments.htm   (924 words)

  
 WWF Malaysia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-24)
TRAFFIC is the wildlife trade monitoring programme of World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) and the World Conservation Union (IUCN) to monitor trade in and utilisation of wild plants and animals, in co-operation with the CITIES Secretariat.
Unlike the trade in live birds and mammals, the live reptile and amphibian trade is largely unregulated, with comparatively few species enjoying international protection under the Convention on the International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Flora and Fauna (CITES).
With three-fourths of Asia's freshwater turtle species now listed as threatened, and over half considered endangered, the report called for far more effective measures to protect these animals, which are heavily exploited in the region primarily for food and traditional medicine.
www.wwfmalaysia.org /Traffic/traffic1.htm   (617 words)

  
 Text of the Convention   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-24)
(b) other species which must be subject to regulation in order that trade in specimens of certain species referred to in sub-paragraph (a) of this paragraph may be brought under effective control.
Appendix III shall include all species which any Party identifies as being subject to regulation within its jurisdiction for the purpose of preventing or restricting exploitation, and as needing the co-operation of other Parties in the control of trade.
The original of the present Convention, in the Chinese, English, French, Russian and Spanish languages, each version being equally authentic, shall be deposited with the Depositary Government, which shall transmit certified copies thereof to all States that have signed it or deposited instruments of accession to it.
www.cites.org /eng/disc/text.shtml   (5454 words)

  
 Trade & Environment - Researching International Economic Law
Global Environment and Trade Study (GETS) was established in 1994 by the Yale Center for Environmental Law and Policy and the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy.
International Environmental Law (ASIL), by Anne Burnett, is another detailed research guide on international environmental law.
Trade and Environment Database TED (American University) is an inventory of the impacts of trade on environment and other issues.
www.ll.georgetown.edu /intl/iiel/trade/environment.htm   (288 words)

  
 Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species... - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Convention_on_International_Trade_in_Endangered_Species...   (185 words)

  
 The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES)
Prevent international trade from threatening the survival of wild fauna and flora: The objective of CITES is to prevent international trade from threatening the survival of wild fauna and flora.
Control of international trade in endangered species is primarily done through government permits/certificates required for such trade.
Types of international trade export: Control procedures for species listed in these Appendices vary depending on the type of international trade export, re-export (export of any specimen that has previously been imported), and introduction from the sea.
www.unescap.org /DRPAD/VC/orientation/legal/3_CITES.htm   (304 words)

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