Factbites
 Where results make sense
About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   PR   |   Contact us  

Topic: Conversos


Related Topics
Jew

  
 [No title]
Professor Seidenspinner-Núñez works in medieval Spanish literature and comparative medieval literature; more recent research approaches 14th- and 15th-century peninsular literature and culture incorporating cultural studies and feminist theory and centers on converso texts (Jewish converts to Christianity), literature and the law, and the Inquisition.
Current research project, Conversion and Subversion: Converso Discourses in Trastámaran Spain, examines the interventions of the conversos in Spanish culture under the Trastámara (1369-1516) in the context of nation-building and the formation of a persecuting society.
"Conversion and Subversion: Converso Texts in 15th-Century Spain." Christians, Muslims, and Jews in Medieval and Early Modern Spain: Interaction and Cultural Change.
www.nd.edu /~litprog/faculty.html   (3784 words)

  
 Books, Jewish, Sephard, Sefard, Sephardim, books
Contains many genealogical family trees of prominent conversos, including Silva, Ayala, Franco, Cedillo, Santo Domingo, Cota, Sancho Sanchez de Toledo, Niño, Noez, Tejares, Husillo, Cisneros, Herrera, Ramirez, García de Toledo (La Gallinería), Avalos, Fenolete, Añovar, Sedeño y Mesa, Canales, Ortiz de Torres, Alcocer, Ceballaos, Nuñez, etc.
Conversos, Inquisition and the Expulsion of the Jews from Spain.
Much information about converso families and lists of converso names.
www.orthohelp.com /geneal/Books.htm   (2551 words)

  
 Oral Literature of the Sephardic Jews   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Some Jews, when threatened by the alternative of exile, were to accept Christianity and some were to become sincere converts, but many other conversos who remained in Spain were to practice in secret their ancestral religion for centuries after 1492.
For example, Inquisitional records tell us in detail of just how such Crypto-Jews continued to celebrate, in secret, Sukkoth (Tabernacles) and Pesach (Passover), in Madrid, even in the early 18th century, well over two centuries after the banishment of Jews from Spain (Alpert 1995; 1997).
The Toledan poet, Fernán González de Eslava—a priest who, incidentally, was probably of converso parentage—writing in Mexico City during the second half of the 16th century, included the following verses in one of his compositions, which habitually are amply interlarded with quotations from traditional poetry:
www.sephardifolklit.org /flsj/sjjs/orallit/Oral_Lit_Sephardic.html   (8799 words)

  
 Dan Wyman
CONVERSOS ON TRIAL : THE INQUISITION IN CIUDAD REAL // #4 Leroy, Beatrice.
THE JEWS OF NAVARRE IN THE LATE MIDDLE AGES // # 5: Selke, Angela S. THE CONVERSOS OF MAJORCA //# 6: Assis, Yom Tov.
CONVERSOS AND INQUISITION IN JAEN// # 8: Donate Sebastia, Jose Maria.
www.geocities.com /daniel_wyman/yizkors_and_reference.htm   (7044 words)

  
 Sephardim.com - links
You will also find an administrative division of Spain and Puerto Rico with an alphabetical list of Spanish towns.
The subject of this forum is the research of Sephardic, Anusim and Converso genealogy and related history.
Please feel free to join our forum and contribute or just lurk and learn in the background.
www.sephardim.com /html/links100.html   (2988 words)

Try your search on: Qwika (all wikis)

Factbites
  About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   Press   |   Contact us  
Copyright © 2005-2007 www.factbites.com Usage implies agreement with terms.