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Topic: Corinth, Greece


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  Corinth - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Corinth, or Korinth (Κόρινθος) is a Greek city, on the Isthmus of Corinth, the original isthmus, the narrow stretch of land that joins the Peloponnesus to the mainland of Greece.
In the 7th century BC, when Corinth was ruled by the tyrants Cypselus and Periander, the city sent forth colonists to found new settlements: Syracuse, Ambracia, and with Corcyra, itself perhaps the site of an early Corinthian settlement, Apollonia and Anactorium.
Greece Interstate 8A/ from Corinth to the boundary.
www.kernersville.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Corinth   (1130 words)

  
 AllRefer.com - Corinth, city, Greece, Greece (Greek Political Geography) - Encyclopedia
Founded in 1858 after the destruction of Old Corinth by an earthquake, it was rebuilt after another earthquake in 1928.
Strategically situated on the Isthmus of Corinth and protected by the fortifications on the Acrocorinthus, Corinth was one of the largest, wealthiest, most powerful, and oldest cities of ancient Greece.
It was taken by the Ottoman Turks in 1458, and in 1687 was seized by Venice, which lost it to the Turks in 1715.
reference.allrefer.com /encyclopedia/C/CorinthGr.html   (410 words)

  
 Ancient Korinth
Corinth, at the north-eastern tip of Peloponnese, the home of Sisyphos and the great hero Bellerophon, was one of the oldest Greek city-states and among the most important ones.
It was this position that made her the richest commercial city of ancient Greece.
Equated with the Homeric city Ephyra, Corinth was the innovator and master builder of commercial and war ships and developed great wealth from the ancient times, establishing a series of colonies, among them Syracuse.
www.sikyon.com /Korinth/korinth_eg.html   (105 words)

  
 A Student's Tour of Greece - Corinth   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
In fact, Ancient Corinth was one of the largest, most powerful and wealthiest cities of Ancient Greece and was the major exporter of fl figure pottery until the middle of the 6th century.
The city of Corinth, Greece is located on the Canal of Corinth, the isthmus that connects the Peleponnesus to the Greek mainland (Corinth).
Corinth was one of the first commercial centers in Greece to use coins.
plaza.ufl.edu /kimhutto/Greece/Corinth.htm   (406 words)

  
 Corinth at the Time of Paul's Arrival   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Corinth, the capital of the province of Achaia, was a city of social, cultural, and religious diversity, including Jews.
Corinth was located directly south of the Corinthian Gulf, on the Peloponnesian side (southern Greece) of the Isthmus of Corinth
Corinth was prosperous enough to be named as one of the three economic centers of Greece by Plutarch, a writer of the second century.
gbgm-umc.org /umw/corinthians/city.stm   (1525 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Corinth, Greece   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
It is the most famous beach along with Loutra Elenis 5 km NE of Corinth and 4 km north of GR-8A, E94.
The area around Corinth and the western Saronic including the southeastern part are made up of fault lines including the Corinth Fault and the Poseidon Fault and includes one running from Perahcora to Agioi Theodoroi.
Greece Interstate 8A/E94 from Corinth to the boundary.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Corinth,-Greece   (1123 words)

  
 Travel around Greece, Peloponnesos, Corinth
The city of ancient Corinth grew up 7 km (4 miles) SW in a beautiful setting on the northern slopes at the foot of the hill of Acrocorinth (Akrokorinthos), which acted as the fortified citadel of the ancient and medieval cities.
BC Corinth was one of the three major powers in Greece, and took part in all the battles against the Persians.
After the Persians ceased to be a danger to Greece, her intense rivalry with Athens reduced Corinth to a secondary position.
greece-private.com /corinth.htm   (1013 words)

  
 History of Ancient Corinth/Korinth
Corinth after the tyranny was ruled by the aristocrats under a Counsil of eighty members and developed good relations with all the other city states, becoming a member of the Peloponnesian league.
During the Persian invasion of Greece, Corinth was chosen as the headquarters of the Hellenic league and took part in the battle of Salamis (480 BC), with forty ships under the command of Adeimantos.
Corinth dispatched 2000 troops under Aristeos who was captured by the Athenians, sent to Athens and executed.
www.sikyon.com /Korinth/history_eg.html   (1866 words)

  
 Travel for Kids: Corinth, Greece
Corinth was a bustling Greek city for centuries, strategically placed at the isthmus between the Peleponnese and mainland Greece, and in the and in the Roman era, Corinth replaced Athens as the capital.
Corinth Canal – The Peleponnese is divided from mainland Greece by a narrow isthmus, and this bitty piece of land was a big inconvenience for boats going between the Gulf of Corinth and the Saronic Gulf.
Bellerophon, son of the King of Corinth, is sent on a dangerous mission, and his only hope is to find and tame the wild flying horse, Pegasus.
www.travelforkids.com /Funtodo/Greece/corinth.htm   (735 words)

  
 Corinth Canal - Peloponnese Greece History of Corinth Canal - Corinthia Greece
Before the Corinth Canal was constructed, ships had to travel all around the Peloponnese, which added approximately 185 nautical miles, and several days more travel to their journey time.
The tyrant of Corinth, Periander, was the first who envisioned the Corinth Canal in 602BC, but the technical capabilities in ancient times made his idea impossible to carry out.
The Corinth Canal was actually based on the “Panama ans Suez Canals”, and has often been referred to as the “step-child” of these canals.
www.aroundgreece.com /corinth-canal-peloponnese-greece.html   (758 words)

  
 corinth peloponissos greece, hotels, accommodations, camping, camp sites, corinthia peloponnese greece
The capital, Corinth, is 84 km from Athens.
The prefecture of Corinth is also an ideal place for summer vacations since many are the wonderful beaches that have contributed to the development of tourism.
The prefecture of Corinth is known for many more amazing places, such as Isthmus, a narrow cutting in the land to allow the ships to pass and historic villages such as Dervenakia, who marked an important victory against the Turks.
www.united-hellas.com /tourism/pelop/corinth   (329 words)

  
 Ancient History Sourcebook: Polybius: The Destruction of Corinth, 146 BCE
For though Greece as a whole, as well as separate parts of it, has on several occasions sustained grave disasters, yet to none of her previous defeats could the word "misfortune" be more properly applied, than to those which have befallen her in our time.
For it is not only that the sufferings of Greece excite compassion: stronger still is the conviction, which a knowledge of the truth of the several occurrences must bring, that in all she undertook she was supremely unfortunate.
For in times past the Greeks had met with reverses or indeed complete disaster, either from internal dissensions or from treacherous attacks of despots; but in the present instance it was from the folly of their leaders and their own lack of wisdom that they experienced the grievous misfortunes which befell them.
www.fordham.edu /halsall/ancient/polybius-corinth146.html   (4195 words)

  
 Navis.gr - The Corinth Canal from Space   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
The Isthmus of Corinth is 20 miles (32 km) long and 4 to 8 miles (6 to 13 km) wide, and connects central Greece (bottom left and bottom center of the image) with the Peloponnesus (upper right of the image).
The Gulf of Corinth, an inlet to the Ionian Sea, is 80 miles (130 km) long and from 3 to 20 (5 to 32 km) wide.
Corinth is a port and major transportation center trading in olives, tobacco, raisins, and wine.
www.navis.gr /canals/co_space.htm   (169 words)

  
 Corinth - Greece Travel
The gulf of Corinth is a very beautiful and narrow fiord, with chains of mountains on either side, through the gaps of which you can see far into the Morea on one side, and into Northern Greece on the other.
The capture of Corinth, in 146 B.C., marks the Roman conquest of all Greece, and the art-treasures carried to Rome seem to have been as great and various as those which even Athens could have produced.
Nature had marked out her site as one of the great thoroughfares of the old world; and it was not till after centuries of blighting misrule by the wretehed Turks that she sank into the hopeless decay from which not even another Julius Caesar could rescue her.
www.oldandsold.com /articles13/travel-263.shtml   (738 words)

  
 Lesson 2
Corinth was a commercial metropolis and the capital of Southern Greece.
It was situated on the isthmus of Greece on the principle trade route of the Empire connecting Italy with Asia Minor.
Corinth was known as the Vanity Fair of the Roman Empire - the London and Paris of the First Century after Christ.
www.calvarychapel.com /thomasville/extras/lesson2.htm   (1561 words)

  
 Corinth : Introduction | Frommers.com
This was when Corinth made and exported the distinctive red-and-fl figured pottery decorated with lively animal motifs, examples of which are on display in the excavation museum.
The only obstacle Corinth couldn't overcome was the isthmus itself: Ships had to be dragged from the port of Kenchreai on the east to the port of Lechaion on the west.
Although Corinth's greatest period of prosperity was between the 8th and 5th centuries B.C., most of the ancient remains here are from the Roman period.
www.frommers.com /destinations/corinth/1626010001.html   (486 words)

  
 Ancient Corinth 1676-1923
Corinth is the site of the oldest American excavation in Greece, 100 years old in 1996.
The works are also useful for a view of Corinth (and Greece) in the 18th and 19th centuries as they contain a large amounts of topographical and ethnographic information.
Though I didn't realize it until I was almost finished with my research in Greece, my research agenda was based on his, and benefited from the use of his sources which were collected over a much longer period of time than my own and from a wider variety of archives and libraries.
corinth.sas.upenn.edu /deftext.html   (718 words)

  
 Ancient History Sourcebook: Pausanias: Description of Greece, Book II: Corinth
The Isthmian games were not interrupted even when Corinth had been laid waste by Mummius, but so long as it lay deserted the celebration of the games was entrusted to the Sicyonians, and when it was rebuilt the honor was restored to the present inhabitants.
While these were kings the Dorians took the field against Corinth, their leader being Aletes, the son of Hippotas, the son of Phylas, the son of Antiochus, the son of Heracles.
Corinth was held by Antigonus, and there was a Macedonian garrison in the city, but he threw them into a panic by the suddenness of his assault, winning a battle and killing among others Persaeus, the commander of the garrison, who had studied philosophy under Zeno,
www.fordham.edu /halsall/ancient/pausanias-bk2.html   (20659 words)

  
 BBC - Schools - Ancient Greece Corinth
The city state of Corinth had 900 square kilometres of mountains and farmland.
The city state of Corinth was between those of Sparta and Athens.
From the name 'Corinth' we get the English word 'currant' — for small fl grapes that have been dried in the sun.
www.bbc.co.uk /schools/ancientgreece/corinth/citystate.shtml   (101 words)

  
 Corinth on Encyclopedia.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
It became (224 BC) a leading member of the Achaean League and in 146 BC was destroyed by the victorious Romans.
ATHENS, GREECE - Spanning the Corinth Strait and connecting the Pelopponese to mainland Greece, the new Rion-Antirion Bridge is the world's longest cable-stayed bridge and offically opened August 8, 2
Diners travel to Dilworth's in Corinth, Mississippi, to pick up their tasty tamales and enjoy them in the car on the way home.
www.encyclopedia.com /html/C/CorinthG1r.asp   (761 words)

  
 Ancient Corinth Greece - Acrocorinth & Other Historical Sites
The main focus of the excavated area is the 5th century BC Temple of Apollo with its seven Doric columns.
This is one of the few structures from the Classical Greece era to have survived the numerous earthquakes and manmade destruction which razed much of the ancient city to the ground.
Legend has it that Peirene, the daughter of the river god Asopus, wept so uncontrollably when her son was killed that the gods turned her into a fountain to save the water.
www.indigoguide.com /greece/ancient-corinth.htm   (612 words)

  
 Corinth Greece (Korinthos) - Corinth Hotels
At the Isthmus of Corinth, 75kms from Athens on the National Road to Corinth and Patras, lies the hotel complex "Isthmia Prime Hotel".
The famous cosmopolitan beaches of Loutraki, Isthmia, Corinth and the Baths of Beautiful Helen are in a very close distance of the hotel.
Kalamaki Beach Hotel is situated 6 km from the Corinth canal, on the road to the ancient theatre of Epidaurus and only 85 km from Athens.
www.greekhotel.com /peloponnese/corinth/home.htm   (230 words)

  
 Corinth Area with Cenchrea, harbor and canal (BiblePlaces.com)
The isthmus connecting the Peloponnese and mainland Greece is four miles wide and as early as the 6th century B.C., work was begun to dig a canal connecting the Corinthian and Saronic gulfs.
Cenchrea was the port for Corinth on the eastern side of the isthmus, and remains of the ancient harbor are visible in the water today.
Corinth Canal - Diolkos (Sailing Issues) An informative article about the ancient Diolkos and the modern canal through the isthmus with a helpful map.
www.bibleplaces.com /corintharea.htm   (426 words)

  
 Corinth, city, Greece
, Corinth was one of the largest, wealthiest, most powerful, and oldest cities of ancient Greece.
After the battle of Chaeronea (338 B.C.) Corinth was garrisoned by Macedonian troops.
Corinth was again laid waste by the invading Goths (A.D. 395) and by an earthquake in 521.
www.infoplease.com /ce6/world/A0813549.html   (404 words)

  
 Handbook of Texas Online: CORINTH, TX
Corinth is on Farm Road 1915 some ten miles west of Cameron in western Milam County.
It was settled by Czechs and Germans in 1847 and was named for the biblical city of Corinth, Greece.
Corinth served as the judicial seat of Precinct Six until 1892, when the office of the justice of the peace was moved to Buckholts.
www.tsha.utexas.edu /handbook/online/articles/view/CC/hvc77.html   (219 words)

  
 Corinth, Isthmus of --¬† Encyclop√¶dia Britannica   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Modern Greek Isthmós Korínthou, isthmus dividing the Saronic Gulf (an inlet of the Aegean Sea) from the Gulf of Corinth (an inlet of the Ionian Sea).
Historically the Isthmus of Corinth was of major importance because it connected what otherwise would be the island of the Peloponnese...
Its location on the Isthmus of Corinth, the narrow strip of land that separates the Peloponnesus from northern Greece, allowed it to control the traffic between north and south.
www.britannica.com /eb/article-9026296?tocId=9026296   (885 words)

  
 corinth greece and other greece related information   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Corinth, Greece Temple of Apollo at Corinth () Corinth (Greek Korinthos) is a Greek city, on the isthmus which joins the Peloponnesus to the mainland of Greece.
Ancient Corinth, the original Corinth, founded in the 10th Century BCE, had been the richest port and the largest city in ancient Greece.
Stolen Antiquities from Corinth returned to Greece T he night of April 12th, 1990, the Museum of Corinth was attacked by a gang of four smugglers who first wounded the guard, Mr Theophanis Kakouris, and...
www.nethorde.com /greece/corinth-greece.html   (301 words)

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