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Topic: Coronation of the British monarch


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  Crowned.eu
A coronation is a ceremony marking the investment of a monarch with regal power through, amongst other symbolic acts, the placement of a crown upon his or her head.
A coronation ceremony is generally religious in character, because from the earliest times it was believed that monarchs were chosen by God, in accordance with the Divine Right of Kings; hence, the crown was bestowed by God himself.
In Norway, the coronation was abolished in 1908 and the king was thereafter only required by law to go through the taking of the oath in the Storting, but when Olav V was to be crowned in 1958 he still wanted the church's blessing for his reign and the benediction was introduced.
www.crowned.eu   (1217 words)

  
  Coronation - Search Results - MSN Encarta
Coronation, ceremony having as its central act the placing of a crown on the head of a monarch.
A coronation is a ceremony marking the investment of a monarch with regal power through, amongst other symbolic acts, the placement of a crown upon his or her head.
The Coronation of the British Monarch is a ceremony (specifically, initiation rite) in which the monarch of the United Kingdom and of the other Commonwealth Realms is formally...
encarta.msn.com /Coronation.html   (197 words)

  
  British monarchy - Biocrawler   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Edward's Crown, the crown used during the British monarch's coronation, is sometimes used on coats of arms, flags, and logos as a symbol of royal authority.
It is the prerogative of the monarch to summon, prorogue, and dissolve Parliament.
The monarch is only an ordinary member, and not the head or leader, of the established Church of Scotland; however, he or she does hold the power to appoint the Lord High Commissioner to the Church's General Assembly.
www.biocrawler.com /encyclopedia/British_monarchy   (9269 words)

  
 British monarch
Monarchs are not allowed to unilaterally abdicate; the only monarch to voluntarily abdicate, Edward VIII (1936), did so with the authorisation of a special Act of Parliament (His Majesty's Declaration of Abdication Act 1936).
It is the prerogative of the monarch to summon, prorogue, and dissolve Parliament.
The monarch is only an ordinary member, and not the head or leader, of the Church of Scotland; however, he or she does hold the power to appoint the Lord High Commissioner to the Church's General Assembly.
www.jgames.co.uk /title/British_monarch   (10160 words)

  
 coronation
The British coronation ceremony combines the Hebrew rite of anointing with customs of Germanic origin; for example, the actual crowning and the presentation of the monarch to his or her subjects to receive homage.
Coronation of King George VI of England at Westminster Abbey in London.
British TV: first episode of soap opera Coronation Street is broadcast on ITV in the north of England.
www.thehistorychannel.co.uk /site/encyclopedia/article_show/coronation/m0013645.html?from=hotlink   (507 words)

  
 Coronation of the British monarch - Information at Halfvalue.com
The first such coronation was of Henry II of England and Eleanor of Aquitaine in 1154; fourteen such coronations have been performed, including that of the co-rulers William III and Mary II, the most recent being that of George VI and Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon in 1937.
British law prohibited the removal of the British Crown Jewels from the nation; therefore, a separate crown, known as the Imperial Crown of India, was created for George V. The Emperor was enthroned, and the Indian princes paid homage to him.
"The Coronation and Parliamentary Robes of the British Peerage." Arma.
www.halfvalue.com /wiki.jsp?topic=Coronation_of_the_British_monarch   (5221 words)

  
  CalendarHome.com - - Calendar Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Monarchs are not allowed to unilaterally abdicate; the only monarch to voluntarily abdicate, Edward VIII (1936), did so with the authorisation of a special Act of Parliament (His Majesty's Declaration of Abdication Act 1936).
It is the prerogative of the monarch to summon, prorogue, and dissolve Parliament.
The monarch is only an ordinary member, and not the head or leader, of the Church of Scotland; however, he or she does hold the power to appoint the Lord High Commissioner to the Church's General Assembly.
encyclopedia.calendarhome.com /cgi-bin/encyclopedia.pl?p=British_monarchy   (9319 words)

  
 Upto11.net - Wikipedia Article for British monarchy   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The British monarch or Sovereign is the monarch and head of state of the United Kingdom and its overseas territories, and is the source of all executive, judicial and (as the Queen-in-Parliament) legislative power.
The current monarch is Queen Elizabeth II (since the death of her father, King George VI on February 6 1952) and the Heir Apparent is Charles, Prince of Wales (son of the Queen, born November 14 1948).
The monarch is only an ordinary member, and not the head or leader, of the established Church of Scotland; however, he or she does hold the power to appoint the Lord High Commissioner to the Church's General Assembly.
www.upto11.net /generic_wiki.php?q=british_monarchy   (5366 words)

  
 Coronation of the British monarch - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Coronation of the British monarch is a ceremony (specifically, initiation rite) in which the monarch of the United Kingdom and the other Commonwealth Realms is formally crowned and invested with regalia.
British law prohibited the removal of the British Crown Jewels from the nation; therefore, a separate crown, known as the Imperial Crown of India, was created for George V. The Emperor was enthroned, and the Indian princes paid homage to him.
"The Coronation and Parliamentary Robes of the British Peerage." Arma.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Coronation_of_the_British_monarch   (4683 words)

  
 The British Raj
Indeed, British Rule in India, known immortally as the British Raj, was a result of the Victorian eraĆ­s infusion of British liberal philosophy in colonial policy and social governance with that of the diverse, regional, religious and princely regimes that defined the Indian mosaic.
Despite, the British, through ruthless and iron stamina were beginning to get the upper hand by early autumn, and the turning point came with the capture of Delhi in September when 30,000 or more rebels fled the city before the final four weeks of the assault.
In the eyes of many of the British in India, however, the brown skin of the indigenous man and woman was perceived to be an even greater burden, serving as a badge of inferiority and a bar to progress towards European political rights and freedoms.
www.drake.edu /artsci/PolSci/ssjrnl/2001/nunn.html   (5025 words)

  
 National Library Board :: Singapore On Parade
Not to be outdone, Singapore-made parades, buntings, illumination and parties marked the crowning of four British monarchs in the 20th century.
The coronation of King Edward VII was also memorable for the laying of the foundation stone of the Victoria Memorial Hall by the H.E., Governor Sir F. Swettenham.
In the British Empire, Jubilee celebrations were held to commemorate the longevity of a monarch's reign.
exhibitions.nlb.gov.sg /NDP/virtual/preindependence_coronation.asp   (1714 words)

  
 Westminster Abbey - Abbey Tour - The Coronation Chair
Coronations have taken place at Westminster Abbey since at least 1066, when William the Conqueror arrived in London after his victory at the Battle of Hastings.
Coronations do not seem to have had a fixed location before 1066, though several monarchs were crowned at Kingston-upon-Thames, where the King's Stone still exists.
At the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II in 1953, for the first time the Services was televised and millions of her subjects could see and hear the ceremony taking place.
www.westminster-abbey.org /tour/coronation_chair/monarch.htm   (777 words)

  
 British monarchy information - Search.com
The British monarch or Sovereign is the head of state of the United Kingdom and in the British overseas territories.
Most prerogative powers are exercised not by the monarch personally, but by ministers acting on his or her behalf; examples such as the power to regulate the civil service and the power to issue passports.
Monarchs had existed in the island of Britain since before Roman times; many of these "Celtic" rulers were to ally with or fall to the Romans who made the province of Britannia (roughly modern England and Wales) part of their empire.
www.search.com /reference/British_monarch   (9658 words)

  
 [British monarchy] | [All the best British monarchy resources at karaoke.velocityincome.com]   (Site not responding. Last check: )
In a "hung parliament," in which no party or coalition holds a majority, the monarch obtains an increased degree of latitude in his or her choice of Prime Minister.[specify] Still, however, the individual most likely to command the support of the Database, usually the leader of the largest party, must be appointed.
British monarchy After the Empire After the Empire Map of the Commonwealth Realms where once the British Monarch reigned over all, but now the Crown is 'divided' so that one shared Sovereign reigns as Monarch of each nation separately.
British monarchy Residences Residences Buckingham Palace is the monarch's principal residence.
karaoke.velocityincome.com /British_monarchy   (10443 words)

  
 Coronations
Canadian compositions for coronations and other ceremonial occasions are not numerous, but the genre has had among its practitioners composers of distinction, including C.A.E. Harriss and Healey Willan.
Harriss wrote a Coronation Mass for Edward VII (1902) and an ode, The Crowning of the King (for the coronation of George V, 1911).
The coronation of Queen Elizabeth II in 1953 in Westminster Abbey included the singing (in the composer's presence) of Willan's 'O Lord, Our Governour' (B56, words from Psalms), the first piece of music commissioned for the coronation ceremony of a British monarch from a composer not resident in Great Britain.
www.thecanadianencyclopedia.com /index.cfm?PgNm=TCE&Params=U1ARTU0000812   (268 words)

  
 The Monarchy Today > Ceremony and symbol > Ceremonies > Coronation
The coronation of the new Sovereign follows some months after his or her accession, following a period of mourning and as a result of the enormous amount of preparation required to organise the ceremony.
The coronation is an occasion for pageantry and celebration, but it is also a solemn religious ceremony.
The coronation ring, which had been made to fit her little finger, was forced on to her fourth finger by the Archbishop of Canterbury and the Queen had to bathe her hand in iced water after the ceremony before she could remove it.
www.royal.gov.uk /output/page4946.asp   (738 words)

  
 Papal Tiara
As with all other modern coronations, the ceremony itself was only symbolic; the person duly elected became pope and Bishop of Rome the moment he accepted his election in the Conclave, as popes John Paul I and II showed by declining a coronation.
As with all previous popes, Pope Paul VI was crowned with a tiara at the papal coronation.
In 1978, one of Pope John Paul I's first decisions on his election was to dispense with the millennium-old papal coronation and the use of a papal tiara.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/pa/Papal_tiara.html   (3396 words)

  
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Coronation
coronation ceremonial in the world the history of which is so well known to us as that of England and we have consequently given it the preference in order of treatment.
coronation of the emperor and to trace the stages of their development, the subject remains intricate and obscure.
coronation and by means of a golden needle a drop of its contents was extracted and mixed with chrism.
www.newadvent.org /cathen/04380a.htm   (5962 words)

  
 “Coming Soon: A New Royal Family!” - theTrumpet.com
In his biography of Queen Elizabeth ii, Ben Pimlott wrote, “In many ways, the Coronation of Elizabeth ii in 1953 was the most magnificent and affecting royal ceremonial of the century—despite, or because of, the decline in the importance of the monarch” (The Queen).
The ruling monarch was now a head of state, advised by courtiers and reliant upon the prime minister’s wisdom to ensure national guidance in politics, administration and security.
Remember, at her coronation the queen was handed God’s Word and instructed that it was “the most valuable thing that this world affords.” The consequences of forsaking God’s law are clearly outlined by God in His Word.
www.thetrumpet.com /index.php?page=article&id=596   (2009 words)

  
 British monarchy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
In addition, the monarch is the head or commander in chief of the Armed Forces (the British Army, the Royal Navy, and the Royal Air Force).
The monarch is only an ordinary member, and not the head or leader, of the Church of Scotland; however, he or she does hold the power to appoint the Lord High Commissioner to the Church's General Assembly.
The monarch chooses his or her regnal name, which is not necessarily his or her first name - King George VI, King Edward VII and Queen Victoria did not use their first names.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/British_monarch   (9972 words)

  
 [No title]
It is not clear whether HM Queen Victoria Eugenia of Spain, born a British Princess and widow of King Alfonso XIII, was present at the Coronation ceremony.
The British Royal Family was almost all present, with the exception of HRH the Duke of Windsor and HRH the Duchess of Fife, due to her illness.
The former King was not invited for it would be strange to have a former monarch at the coronation of his successor’s successor and it was clear to everyone that it could cause some embarrassment.
www.angelfire.com /realm2/coronation/guests.html   (919 words)

  
 British Coronations - The British Monarchy
But the institution of monarchy does not die with the death of the monarch, and instead continues its binding function from age to age.
Each Coronation is a presented as a sacrament at which the nation celebrates its beginnings, reaffirms its purpose, and dedicates itself anew.
Coronations are naturally associated with national rejoicing and gladness, though not all of them have been celebrated with gladness.
www.londononline.co.uk /monarchy/Coronations   (228 words)

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