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Topic: Cotard Delusion


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In the News (Sun 16 Jun 19)

  
 Kids.Net.Au - Encyclopedia > Cotard Delusion
The Cotard Delusion or Cotard's Syndrome is a rare disorder in which a person holds a delusional belief they are dead, do not exist, are putrifying or have lost their blood or internal organs.
It is named after Jules Cotard (1840 - 1889) a French neurologist who first described the condition, which he called le délire de négation, in a lecture in Paris in 1880.
In this lecture, Cotard described a patient with the moniker of Mademoiselle X, who denied the existence of God, the Devil, several parts of her body and denied she needed to eat.
www.kids.net.au /encyclopedia-wiki/co/Cotard_Delusion   (284 words)

  
 The Autism Home Page
However, Forstl and Beats (1992) report that Charles Bonnet in 1788 described the case of a woman who developed the delusion that she was dead (Cotard syndrome) and that she was in another place (reduplicative paramnesia).
Jules Cotard describes the syndrome that now bears his name in this way (please excuse the horrible translation and paraphrase): "In all the patients the hypochondriacal delirium introduces great delusions: their brain, stomach, heart, blood, spirit and/or body are missing.
Cotard and many other more-contemporary researchers believed the disorder was much more complex than a mere "delusion that you are dead", as currently defined by many of the researchers (e.g., Joseph and O'Leary, 1986).
groups.msn.com /TheAutismHomePage/cotardsyndrome.msnw   (1787 words)

  
  Cotard Delusion
The Cotard Delusion or Cotard's Syndrome is a rare disorder in which a person holds a delusional belief they are dead, do not exist, are putrifying or have lost their blood or internal organs.
It is named after Jules Cotard (1840 - 1889) a French neurologist who first described the condition, which he called le délire de négation, in a lecture in Paris in 1880.
In this lecture, Cotard described a patient with the moniker of Mademoiselle X, who denied the existence of God, the Devil, several parts of her body and denied she needed to eat.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/co/Cotard_delusion.html   (259 words)

  
  Cotard delusion - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Cotard delusion or Cotard's syndrome is a rare disorder in which a person holds a delusional belief that he is dead, does not exist, is putrefying or has lost his blood or internal organs.
It is named after Jules Cotard (1840 - 1889) a French neurologist who first described the condition, which he called le délire de négation ("negation delirium"), in a lecture in Paris in 1880.
In this lecture, Cotard described a patient with the moniker of Mademoiselle X, who denied the existence of God, the Devil, several parts of her body and denied she needed to eat.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Cotard_delusion   (293 words)

  
 Jules Cotard - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jules Cotard (June 1, 1840 - August 19, 1889) was a French neurologist who is best known for first describing the Cotard delusion, the delusional belief that you are dead, do not exist or do not have bodily organs.
In 1869 Cotard left Salpêtrière and at the outbreak of the Franco-Prussian War and joined an infantry regiment as a regimental surgeon.
Cotard moved to the town of Vanves in 1874 where he remained for the last 15 years of his life.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Jules_Cotard   (263 words)

  
 delusion - Article and Reference from OnPedia.com
A delusion is commonly defined as a false belief, and is used in everyday language to describe a belief that is either false, fanciful or derived from deception.
Delusions typically occur in the context of neurological or mental illness, although they are not tied to any particular disease and have been found to occur in the context of many pathological states (both physical and mental).
Secondary delusions (sometimes called delusion-like ideas) are considered to be, at least in principle, understandable in the context of a person's life history, personality, mood state or presence of other psychopathology.
www.onpedia.com /encyclopedia/delusion   (1032 words)

  
 Delusion . Enpsychlopedia
A delusion is commonly defined as a fixed false belief and is used in everyday language to describe a belief that is either false, fanciful or derived from deception.
Delusions typically occur in the context of neurological or mental illness, although they are not tied to any particular disease and have been found to occur in the context of many pathological states (both physical and mental).
In other cases, the delusion may be assumed to be false by a doctor or psychiatrist assessing the belief, because it seems to be unlikely, bizarre or held with excessive conviction.
enpsychlopedia.org /psypsych/Delusion   (869 words)

  
 All in the Mind: 24 September  2005  - Do You See What I See? Delusions
Cotard’s syndrome is the belief that you have died, and for sufferers it is a terrifying state.
Delusions can take many forms; from a general paranoia that people are out to get you to a singular belief like Cotard delusion, the belief that you are dead.
Cotard delusion and Capgras delusion – some of those misidentification delusions are often of that second type – but not always of course.
www.abc.net.au /rn/science/mind/stories/s1463935.htm   (4383 words)

  
 Introducing Philosophical Psychopathology by Rüdiger Vaas
Delusions, hallucinations and thought disorders form the core of psychotic disorders (traditional "madness" and "insanity"), which is characterized by a patient's lack of insight into his or her condition.
They occur in schizophrenia, in paranoid psychoses and in delusional dysmorphobia, in which the patient perceives himself or herself to be ugly (as often in the case of anorexia nervosa).
Evaluative delusions are remarkable philosophically due to the dichotomy of fact and value as well as that of content and form.
www.human-nature.com /nibbs/02/vaas.html   (5262 words)

  
 Institut | Nicod ----- Activities: APIC 2004 - Experience and delusional beliefs   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Delusions – beliefs entertained in spite of the fact that they contradict common sense - have been classically understood as originating in a perturbed thought process.
Classic schizophrenic delusions include thinking that certain people are out to get you (delusions of paranoia), thinking that people are controlling one’s actions (delusions of control) and thinking that people are inserting thoughts into one’s mind (delusions of thought-insertion).
Other delusions include thinking that one is dead (Cotard’s delusion), that one’s close relatives had been replaced by doubles (Capgras delusion), and that one is being followed by persons known to one who are in disguise (Fregoli delusion).
www.institutnicod.org /act.php?n=10   (275 words)

  
 psycolloquy
Cotard's delusion, in its classical form, is the delusion that one is dead.
Cotard's delusion was first described, by Cotard in1880 as the delire de negation (nihilistic delusion) but subsequently (1897) renamed after Cotard himself and is largely identified with the belief that one is dead.
The Cotards delusion can be accounted for by the converse intuition: it is impossible to experience ones body in the absence of emotions understood not in James way as overt behaviours but as the affect programs which coordinate them.
www.maccs.mq.edu.au /~max/Tompath/Gerrans.html   (5718 words)

  
 Cotard's syndrome | Jef's web files   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Cotard's syndrome or Cotard's delusion comprises any one of a series of delusions ranging from the fixed and unshakable belief that one has lost organs, blood, or body parts to believing that one has lost one's soul or is dead.
Jules Cotard, a Parisian neurologist and psychiatrist and former military surgeon, was one of the first to induce cerebral atrophy by the experimental embolization of cerebral arteries in animals and a pioneer in studies of the clinicopathologic correlates of cerebral atrophy secondary to perinatal and postnatal pathologic changes.
Cotard's syndrome, while not an example of a healthy human consciousness, does perhaps shed some light on the fallacy of Descarte's famous assumption.
www.jefallbright.net /node/view/1729   (271 words)

  
 Cotard delusion
The Cotard delusion or Cotard's syndrome is a rare disorder in which a person holds a delusional belief they are dead,do not exist, are putrifying or have lost their blood or internal organs.
It is named after Jules Cotard (1840 - 1889) a French neurologist who first described the condition, which he called le délire denégation ("negation delirium"), in a lecture in Paris in 1880.
In this lecture, Cotard described a patient with the moniker of Mademoiselle X, who denied the existence of God, the Devil, several parts of her body and denied sheneeded to eat.
www.therfcc.org /cotard-delusion-139920.html   (270 words)

  
 Delusion
For example, a person becomes depressed, suffers very low mood and self-esteem, and subsequently believes he or she is responsible for some terrible crime which he or she did not commit.
Critics (such as R. Laing) have argued that this leads to the diagnosis of delusions being based on the subjective understanding of a particular psychiatrist, who may not have access to all the information which might make a belief otherwise interpretable.
In practice psychiatrists tend to diagnose a belief as delusional if it is either patently bizarre, causing significant distress, or excessively pre-occupies the patient, especially if the person is subsequently unswayed in belief by counter-evidence or reasonable arguments.
www.mrsci.com /Symptoms/Delusion.php   (1424 words)

  
 Mind Hacks: On testing the dead
The article focuses on a study by Drs Ryan McKay and Lisa Cipolotti on a patient named 'LU' who presented with the delusion when being assessed for the impact of severe epilepsy caused by a viral brain infection.
At neuropsychological assessment LU presented with the Cotard delusion.
One unexplained part, both in this study, and in delusions in general, is why these unusual experiences and odd attributions lead to delusions, and not simply to confusion (e.g.
www.mindhacks.com /blog/2006/11/on_testing_the_dead.html   (615 words)

  
 Institut | Nicod ----- Activities: APIC 2004 International Workshop: Experience and delusional beliefs   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Delusions – beliefs entertained in spite of the fact that they contradict common sense - can take various forms.
Delusions have been classically understood as originating in perturbed thought processes.
Others have insisted that, given that patients may share the experience without forming a delusion, a cognitive bias had to be postulated.
www.institutnicod.org /act.php?n=49   (321 words)

  
 Delusions and confusions - smh.com.au
Capgras' delusion is a form of brain damage, says Coltheart: the parts of the brain that associate face recognition with an emotional response have somehow become disconnected.
The second deficit is to blame for the acceptance of a delusional thought, for it becoming a belief "despite its implausibility and despite all attempts at dissuasion by family, friends and clinicians".
This second deficit, the theory goes, is "present in all cases of delusion and is associated with damage to the right hemisphere of the brain".
www.smh.com.au /articles/2003/07/17/1058035113159.html   (640 words)

  
 Recurrent postictal depression with cotard delusion Mendhekar DN, Gupta Neeraj - Indian J Pediatr
[10] Cotard in 1880 for the first time described this condition in which he believed that he had identified a new type of depression.
[11] Although Segals in 1887 used the term "Cotard syndrome", the term Cotard syndrome and Cotard delusion are used synonymously.
Episodic sense of being dead or presence of episodic Cotard syndrome is probably a clue to the diagnosis of CPS even in the absence of motor phenomenon.
www.ijppediatricsindia.org /article.asp?issn=0019-5456;year=2005;volume=72;issue=6;spage=529;epage=531;aulast=Mendhekar;type=0   (1673 words)

  
 FT.com / Home UK / UK - Deadly serious
The young scientist realised that Liz was suffering from a rare and strange condition known as Cotard syndrome, which for the sake of brevity I'll define as the delusion that one is dead.
Roughly 100 cases of Cotard delusion have been reported in the medical literature, which certainly makes it rare, although not as rare as some other strange delusions, such as the single case of a man with "perceptual delusional bicephaly".
In recent years, the UK researcher Andy Young and his colleagues have suggested that people with Cotard delusion have some kind of malfunction in the second of those elements.
www.ft.com /cms/s/acd56ea4-7c2a-11db-b1c6-0000779e2340.html   (914 words)

  
 Ryan McKay - Home
Delusions are false beliefs that are held with strong conviction despite the efforts of others to dissuade the deluded individual.
Deficit approaches, in contrast, view delusions as the consequence of breakdowns in the normal functioning of belief mechanisms, underpinned by damage or disruption to the brain.
I am interested in specifying correspondences between delusions and other forms of belief and misbelief, and in locating all of these phenomena in a clear evolutionary context.
homepage.mac.com /ryantmckay   (504 words)

  
 Cotard delusion: Facts and details from Encyclopedia Topic   (Site not responding. Last check: )
It is named after Jules Cotard Jules cotard (june 1,1840 - august 19,1889) was a french neurologist who is best known for first describing the cotard delusion, the delusional belief that you are dead, do not exist or...
Capgras delusion The capgras delusion or capgras syndrome is a rare disorder in which a person holds a delusional belief that an acquaintance, usually a close family member or spouse, has been replaced by an identical looking...
Fregoli delusion The fregoli delusion or fregoli syndrome is a rare disorder in which a person holds a delusional belief that different people are in fact a single person who changes their appearance or is in disguise....
www.absoluteastronomy.com /c/cotard_delusion   (1129 words)

  
 Macquarie University News   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Researchers in cognitive neuropsychiatry aim to explain delusions in terms of breakdowns in a system of normal belief formation and evaluation - breakdowns that may result from damage to the brain.
This belief is known as Cotard's delusion, and, like the beliefs of the Ypsilanti Christs, there is little dispute that this belief is pathological.
This model explains delusions in terms of the conjunction of two factors - the first a neuropsychological deficit which gives rise to a bizarre and aberrant perceptual experience, and the second a dysfunction in the mechanisms via which people revise and evaluate their beliefs.
www.pr.mq.edu.au /macnews/showitem.asp?ItemID=221   (578 words)

  
 Delusions and delusional misidentification
A particular interest has been in delusional misidentification, and especially the Capgras delusion (in which patients think that close relatives have been replaced by impostors).
Ellis and Young suggested in 1990 that the Capgras delusion results from damage to a neurological system involved in orienting responses to seen faces based on their personal significance.
Capgras delusion patients did not reveal autonomic discrimination between familiar and unfamiliar faces, but orienting responses to auditory tones were normal in magnitude and rate of initial habituation, showing that the hyporesponsiveness is circumscribed.
www-users.york.ac.uk /~awy1/delusion.html   (505 words)

  
 Jules Cotard (1840-1889): His life and the unique syndrome which bears his name -- Pearn and Gardner–Thorpe 58 ...
Jules Cotard (1840-1889): His life and the unique syndrome which bears his name -- Pearn and Gardner–Thorpe 58 (9): 1400 -- Neurology
Dr. Jules Cotard (1840–1889) was a Parisian neurologist
delusion is the only self-certifiable syndrome of delusional
www.neurology.org /cgi/content/abstract/58/9/1400   (289 words)

  
 Charles Bonnet's description of Cotard's delusion and reduplicative paramnesia in an elderly patient (1788) -- Forstl ...
An elderly woman developed the delusion that she was dead ('Cotard's
before Cotard's influential description of the nihilistic delusions and of
Jules Cotard (1840-1889): His life and the unique syndrome which bears his name
bjp.rcpsych.org /cgi/content/abstract/160/3/416   (155 words)

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