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Topic: Countess de Castiglione


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In the News (Sat 25 Oct 14)

  
  ARCHIVE   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-01)
We knew that the Countess was a nineteenth-century Italian noblewoman who had briefly been a lover of Napoleon III, who had lived most of her life (1837-1899) in Paris, and who was legendary in her youth for her great beauty, wit, and intelligence.
But mostly we knew the Countess as the author of hundreds of photographic self-portraits, unique in 19th century photo history not so much for their formal innovation but for the extraordinary acts of self-invention that they picture.
By her own estimation, the Countess was a God-given work of art-calling herself a "marvelous work"-but also a political kingpin, whose interventions and personal sacrifices on behalf of Italian sovereignty and the French royalists she felt were sorely under-recognized.
www.doublearchive.com /artafterdeath/countess.html   (510 words)

  
 Castiglione - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Castiglione a Casauria, in the province of Pescara
Castiglione dei Genovesi, in the province of Salerno
Castiglione in Teverina, in the province of Viterbo
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Castiglione   (299 words)

  
 The Metropolitan Museum of Art - Special Exhibitions
In 1856, then eighteen, the countess was sent to Paris by her cousin, the minister to King Victor Emmanuel of Piedmont, to bolster the interest of Napoleon III in the cause of Italian unification.
Although the affair with Napoleon seems to have been quite brief, ending in 1857, the countess continued to be a glamorous and influential fixture of Parisian society, forming numerous liaisons with notable aristocrats, financiers, and politicians.
Prominent among them was Robert de Montesquiou, who spent thirteen years writing her biography, La Divine Comtesse (published in 1913), and also assembled a large collection of her photographs, 275 of which were acquired by the Metropolitan Museum in 1975.
www.metmuseum.org /special/LaDivineComtesse/comtesse_more.asp   (1013 words)

  
 Countess de Castiglione - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Virginia Oldoini, Countess de Castiglione (1837–1899) was a famous Italian courtesan and a significant figure in the early history of photography as a model and a collaborator of photographer Pierre-Louis Pierson.
When the Castigliones traveled to Paris in 1855, the Countess was under her cousin's instructions to plead the cause of Italian unity with Napoleon III of France.
A portrait of the Countess [3] was painted by George Frederic Watts in 1857.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Countess_de_Castiglione   (778 words)

  
 The Italian Almanac - The Countess of Castiglione   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-01)
She was the original "it" girl, a Florentine who became the toast of Parisian society at the tender age of 19.
Beautiful and aristocratic, Virginia Oldoini became the Countess de Castiglione by virtue of an arranged marriage to Count Francesco Verasis de Castiglione.
The Countess inspired numerous artists and writers, and although almost every man in Paris desired her, she did not find much favor with women, who were often jealous of her beauty and status.
italianalmanac.org /biografie/castiglione.htm   (226 words)

  
 Pace/MacGill Gallery: Exhibitions Archive - Photographs from the Collection of Richard Avedon
Considered the most beautiful woman of her day, the Countess de Castiglione was a special agent for the cause of Italian unification, the mistress of Emperor Napoléon III, and a mysterious recluse notorious for her many love affairs.
The Countess was evidently inspired by this depiction of a chaste maiden who chooses to drown rather than undress before the eyes of the sailor who offers to save her life.
The Countess treated social constraints with scornful superiority and took pleasure in ignoring rules and conventions she was convinced did not apply to her.
www.pacemacgill.com /checklist_ra06.php   (1970 words)

  
 Albergo Castiglione - 3 Star Hotel - Langhe - Piedmont
; its name became famous in Europe at the end of the XIX century because of the countess Virginia Oldoini, the wife of Count Francesco Verasis Asinari of Castiglione and the protagonist of the historical scene of the court of the emperor Napoleon III.
From 1855 to 1858 she was the triumphant at the Tuileries, the queen of beauty and elegance, the lady (for little time) of the heart and senses of the fickle emperor Napoleon III.
The high finance, the politic, the Court, all the great personages of the time had relationships with this queen of the hearts who, as D'annunzio wrote, "_ took her beauty as an immortality".
www.italyby.com /castiglionecn/pages/profile.htm   (257 words)

  
 "La Divine Comtesse": Photographs of the Countess de Castiglione Graphis - Find Articles   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-01)
The Contessa de Castiglione was a woman of considerable theatricality and physical beauty-but less wealth-who entered a Parisian society obsessed by theatricality and appearance in the 1850's.
Born to Piedmontese nobility, married to the submissive but eventually exasperated Count of Castiglione, Virginia Oldoini was such a hot item at the court of Turin that she was recruited by Cavour himself as a sort of reclining ambassadrix to further the cause of Italian unification in Paris.
The photographer's studio in the mid-19th century was a place where classes mingled somewhat uncomfortably, and the Divine Countess took her inspiration not only from art and the classical stage but also from the demimonde of the ballet and the dance hall.
www.findarticles.com /p/articles/mi_qa3992/is_200101/ai_n8931366   (723 words)

  
 artnet.com Magazine Reviews - Gotham Dispatch   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-01)
Beautiful and aristocratic, Virginia Oldoini (1837-99) became the Countess de Castiglione by virtue of an arranged marriage to Count Francesco Verasis de Castiglione.
Starting in 1856, at the height of the photographic boom that hit fashionable Paris, New York and London, the Countess made her first appointment to be photographed by the portrait studio of Mayer and Pierson.
By late 1879 Countess Castiglione was a recluse.
www.artnet.com /Magazine/reviews/henry/henry10-18-00.asp   (1044 words)

  
 Amazon.ca: La Divine Comtesse : Photographs of the Countess de Castiglione: Books: Pierre Apraxine   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-01)
Symbol of the Second Empire, that dazzling and artificial epoch, the mysterious Countess de Castiglione dedicated her life to a cult of personal beauty and made sensational appearances at various stages of her life that she recreated for the camera.
Symbol of the Second Empire, that dazzling and artificial epoch, the mysterious Countess de Castiglione dedicated her life to a cult of personal beauty and made sensational appearances at various stages of her life, great moments that she recreated for the camera.
The Countess di Castiglione can be looked upon as a precursor to many artists that have explored self-portraiture, though her "art" captured her narcissism more than any underlying concept or expression.
www.amazon.ca /Divine-Comtesse-Photographs-Countess-Castiglione/dp/0300085095   (652 words)

  
 Daniel Rothbart - Jungle Red and the Divine Countess   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-01)
After Castiglione's death in 1899, most of her photographs were acquired by friend and biographer Robert de Montesquiou and only in 1975 did the Metropolitan Museum purchase 275 of the 400 known works.
The Countess of Castiglione was photographed by court photographer Pierre Louis Pierson.
The Countess of Castiglione worked with Madame Roger, dressmaker to the Empress, to create such memorable costumes as the Queen of Hearts which commanded the admiration of Napoleon III.
www.semioticstreet.com /jungle.html   (417 words)

  
 PART8: Photography   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-01)
The Countess was a wild, free-spirited woman who did whatever she pleased, and so her marriage to the Count was doomed; the Count demanded a divorce soon afterwards.
In 1856, the Countess visited the photographic studio of Mayer and Pierson and met Pierre-Louis Pierson (1822-1913), who would become her closest collaborator and, at the end of her life, one of her few true friends.
Although the Countess was the model and Pierson the photographer, most of the photographs were actually taken under her direction.
dsc.gc.cuny.edu /part/part8/reviews/pierre.html   (1029 words)

  
 The Comtesse de Castiglione (Florence 1837 - Paris 1899) - Musee d'Orsay - Absolutearts.com
The name of Virginia Oldoini, Countess of Castiglione, is linked to Second Empire political and courtly intrigues, to the glamour of the Court at the Tuileries and to the splendour of a cosmopolitan Paris, the world capital of fashion and pleasure.
A cousin of Cavour and a close relation of Victor Emmanuel of Savoy, king of Piedmont, she was sent to Paris in 1856 to plead the cause of Italian unity with Napoleon III.
Virginia de Castiglione left a real imprint on her epoch: photographs of her regularly illustrated publications of the time.
www.absolutearts.com /artsnews/1999/10/29/26093.html   (609 words)

  
 PHOTOGRAPHY REVIEW; A Goddess of Self-Love Who Did Not Sit Quietly - New York Times
The Countess de Castiglione was a rare creature indeed: a full-blown 19th-century narcissist with unlimited access to a camera.
But to watch the countess evolve from self-conscious doll to morbid mourner, to follow her restless preening from youth to the brink of the grave, is mesmerizing.
The two separated in 1857, and the countess spent most of the rest of her life living with her son, Giorgio, and seducing important men in Paris.
query.nytimes.com /gst/fullpage.html?res=9A06E7DD143FF930A25753C1A9669C8B63   (649 words)

  
 eyestorm - article - Shards from the Vanity Mirror
Born Virginia Oldonini in 1837, the Countess of Castiglione assumed her title through her marriage to the Count of Castiglione, Francesco Verasis, in 1854.
Made in response to one of many marital bouts concerning her spending practices and scandalous behavior, the Countess commissioned the portrait and sent it to her husband with the note 'to the Count of Castiglione from the Queen of Etruria'.
While she was at one time supposed to have had a hand in the unification of Italy and the Franco-Prussian War, the Countess of Castiglione's death confirmed her status as a first-rate femme fatale, one whose brash and elegant sexual politics live on in her images today.
www.eyestorm.com /feature/ED2n_article.asp?article_id=199&caller=1   (1657 words)

  
 Guiseppe Castiglione ( - ) Artwork Images, Exhibitions, Reviews
Giovanni Benedetto Castiglione (il Grechetto), The Genius of Giovanni Benedetto Castiglione, circa 1648
Giovanni Benedetto Castiglione (il Grechetto), The Raising of Lazarus, circa 1647 - 1651
The name of Virginia Oldoini, Countess of Castiglione, is linked to Second Empire political and courtly intrigues, to the glamour of the Court at the Tuileries and to th...
www.wwar.com /masters/c/castiglione-guiseppe.html   (728 words)

  
 La Divine Comtesse" Photographs of the Countess de Castiglione, Demande, Xavier / Heilbrun, Francoise / del Barbaro, ...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-01)
La Divine Comtesse" Photographs of the Countess de Castiglione, Demande, Xavier / Heilbrun, Francoise / del Barbaro, Michele Falzone / APRAXINE, PIERRE et al / New York.
With Francoise Heilbrun and Michele Falzone del Barbaro; 192 pp., illustrated in colour and bandw.
A show at the Metropolitan Museum bringing together images of the mysterious Countess de Castiglione.
www.ursusbooks.com /item91410.html   (106 words)

  
 French Culture | art: "La Divine Comtesse"
Considered the most beautiful woman of her time, Virginia Oldoini, known as the Countess de Castiglione, was at various times in her life a spy in the cause of Italian unification, the mistress of Napoleon III, and a mysterious recluse notorious for her numerous love affairs.
Working with the French court photographer Pierre-Louis Pierson (1822-1913), the Countess created a series of self-portraits to chronicle her natural beauty, extravagant couture, public appearances, and private fantasies.
Castiglione's desire, to see herself depicted as "the other", resulted in a body of powerful and unique images that anticipate the portraiture of contemporary artists such as Claude Cahun and Cindy Sherman.
www.info-france-usa.org /culture/art/events/castiglione.html   (175 words)

  
 When and how did this interest in interviewing the dead develop - Log Illustrated 14: The Life and Death Issue - A ...
Which could be a function of her (the Countess) different moods at different times; but I prefer to look at it as a problem of translation.
When I told the medium this was happening, she said this was because the Countess was in my body, she had chosen me as a channel and didn’t want to leave, and that I would have to ask her to leave.
The Countess seemed to be happy and kind of flattered that we were doing the project.
www.physicsroom.org.nz /log/archive/14/artafterdeath   (2219 words)

  
 PART8: Photography   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-01)
In an extraordinary act of self-reinvention, the Countess commissioned numerous photographs from the studio of Mayer and Pierson, the official photography studio to the Emperor Napoleon III.
The photographs were more than collaboration between the parties, as the Countess, the driving force behind their production, was the subject, author and patron of the works.
Although Pierre asserts “…certainly by today’s standards there is no question that the Countess was truly the artist, and Pierson simply the technician,” she does not attempt to debate authorship, rather she concentrates on the significance of the Countess engagement with self-representation, gender construction and societal constructs through the emerging medium of photography.
dsc.gc.cuny.edu /part/part8/ednote.html   (2045 words)

  
 Countess Books, Book Price Comparison at 130 bookstores
by Countess of Romanones Countess of Romanones Aline Contesa de Romanones Countess of Romanones Aline Griffith
Hugo von Hofmannsthal's Correspondence with Countess Ottonie Degenfeld: The Poet and the Countess.
The legendary Countess de Castiglione, embodiment of the Second Empire in France, dedicated her life to a cult of personal beauty.
www.bookfinder4u.com /search_4/Countess.html   (668 words)

  
 The collector's eye of a master portraitist - Arts & Leisure - International Herald Tribune
And a slender volume, "Eye of the Beholder: Photographs From the Collection of Richard Avedon" (Fraenkel Gallery), assembles the majority of the collection in a boxed set of five booklets: "Diane Arbus," "Peter Hujar," "Irving Penn," "The Countess de Castiglione" and "Etcetera," which includes 19th- and 20th- century photographers.
Not long before he died, Avedon bought 18 photographs of the Countess de Castiglione, mistress to Napoleon III, by Pierre-Louis Pierson, considered the most important collection of this series in private hands.
The Countess de Castiglione collaborated with Pierson to construct her many guises in the photographs, with wit, flair and a nod to the artifice of the creation, the same thing Avedon had done in his early fashion tableaus.
www.iht.com /articles/2006/09/04/news/avedon.php   (1206 words)

  
 Castiglione, Virginia Aldoini, countess Verasis de (1835-1899)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-01)
Virginia, countess of Castiglione was a noblewoman from Tuscany.
He had connections with court of King Victor Emmanuel II and Cavour send her to Paris in 1856 to persuade Napoleon III to support Piedmont against the Austrians.
Her curtains were always drawn and the mirrors were covered because she couldn't bear the sight of herself after she lost her beauty.
www.xs4all.nl /~androom/biography/p022118.htm   (239 words)

  
 Untitled Document
Conversations with the Countess of Castiglione is an audio cd which investigates the relationship between those two authors.
The cd documents four interviews - conducted via seances with four different spirit mediums - with the Countess of Castiglione, an Italian noblewoman whose huge output of self-portraits in the 1850s-90s is often cited as a naive precursor to Cindy Sherman, Claude Cahun, and other 20th century artists whose works problematize notions of identity.
Using a small device that floats between dancers in a crowd this real-time manipulative surround sound system allows even the musically challenged to compose the sounds they're moving to.
www.usc.edu /dept/matrix/aim/aimii/exhibition.html   (1599 words)

  
 Fashion photography - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
In 1856, Adolphe Braun published a book containing 288 photographs of Virginia Oldoini, Countess de Castiglione, a Tuscan noblewoman at the court of Napoleon III.
Special emphasis was placed on staging the shots, a process first developed by Baron Adolf de Meyer, who shot his models in natural environments and poses.
Vogue was followed by its rival, Harper's Bazaar, and the two companies were leaders in the field of fashion photography throughout the 1920s and 1930s.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Fashion_photography   (452 words)

  
 Museum Notes by Glenn Loney
LOGO IMAGE FOR "THE DIVINE COUNTESS"--Fascinating photo-portraits of mysterious Countess de Castiglione, who was obsessed with her own image in costume, now at the Met.
The array of fascinating costumed photographs of the self-absorbed Countess of Castiglione now on view at the Met Museum is a reduction of the show recently mounted at Paris's Musée d'Orsay.
A great beauty and a mysterious mistress to Emperor Napoleon III—among others—the countess was sent to Paris by the great Italian liberator, Cavour, to secure the emperor's support for the cause of Italian unification.
www.nymuseums.com /lm00101t.htm   (2559 words)

  
 Welcome to our Bookstore   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-01)
It makes extensive use of colour images, practical assignments, chapter summaries and a project co-ordinated study to teach the principles of photography.
Symbol of the Second Empire, the mysterious Countess de Castiglione dedicated her life to a cult of personal beauty and made sensational appearances at various stages of her life that she recreated for the camera.
This book is a collection of the most remarkable of these photographs.
web.1asphost.com /nikolaosk?category=Photography   (401 words)

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