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Topic: County of Edessa


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  County of Edessa   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-08-19)
The County of Edessa was one of the Crusader states in the 12th century, in a city with an ancient history and an early tradition of Christianity (see Edessa).
Edessa was one of the largest of the Crusader states in terms of territory.
The county's territory extended from Antioch in the west to across the Euphrates in the west, at least at its greatest extent; it also often occupied land as far north as Armenia proper.
factsite.co.uk /en/wikipedia/c/co/county_of_edessa.html   (701 words)

  
 County of Edessa - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-08-19)
The County of Edessa was one of the Crusader states in the 12th century, based around a city with an ancient history and an early tradition of Christianity (see Edessa).
Edessa was the first Crusader state to be captured, and also the first to be lost.
The county's territory extended from Antioch in the west to across the Euphrates in the east, at least at its greatest extent; it also often occupied land as far north as Armenia proper.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/County_of_Edessa   (948 words)

  
 Edessa - Freepedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-08-19)
The name under which Edessa figures in cuneiform inscriptions is unknown; the native name was Osroe, after its purported founder (who was probably only legend), this being the Armenian form for Chosroes; it became in Syriac Ourhoï, in Armenian Ourhaï in Arabic Er Roha, commonly Orfa or Sanli Urfa, its present name.
It was retaken by the Arabs, and then successivelly held by the Greeks, the Seljuk Turks (1087), the Crusaders (1099), who established there the County of Edessa and kept the city until 1144, when it was again captured by the Turk Zengui, and most of its inhabitants were slaughtered together with the Latin archbishop.
Famous individuals connected with Edessa include: Jacob Baradaeus, the real chief of the Syrian Monophysites known after him as Jacobites; Stephen Bar Sudaïli, monk and pantheist, to whom was owing, in Palestine, the last crisis of Origenism in the sixth century; Jacob, Bishop of Edessa, a fertile writer (d.
en.freepedia.org /Edessa.html   (1124 words)

  
 edessa
On the Euphrates, the population was comprised of the Armenian faction (Separated Church) of the Eastern Church.
Edessa was restored to Baldwin ll by the fall of 1108.
Baldwin ll took control of Edessa and made Geoffrey the Monk, commander of the Garrison, protector of the city till the fate of Joscelin could be determined.
www.medievalcrusades.com /edessa.htm   (909 words)

  
 TARZI: Edessa in the Era of Patriarch Michael The Syrian
The County of Edessa was entrusted to Tancred until Baldwin who was taken prisoner at the battle of Harran was released.
The Crusaders, who had managed to maintain their hold on the immediate neighborhood of Edessa, met with the Atabeg of Mosul, Imad ul-din Zangi, an exponent of skill, resourcefulness and determination at the time when the ruler of Edessa was the ineffective Jocelyn the younger.
A census published in 1908 by Ottoman authorities puts the population of Edessa and surroundings (the County of Edessa consisting of Edessa, Birejik, Qal‘at Rrum and Harran) in the vicinity of 72,000.
syrcom.cua.edu /Hugoye/Vol3No2/HV3N2Tarzi.html   (6140 words)

  
 Battle of Harran - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Battle of Harran took place on May 7, 1104 between the Crusader states of the Principality of Antioch and the County of Edessa, and the Seljuk Turks.
In 1104, while the Seljuks were harassing the borders of the County of Edessa, count Baldwin II sought help from Bohemond I of Antioch and Tancred, Prince of Galilee.
Antioch was again crushed at the Battle of Ager Sanguinis in 1119; Edessa never really recovered and survived until 1144 only because of divisions among the Muslims.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Battle_of_Harran   (522 words)

  
 Abstract: Brooks: Baldwin of Boulogne and the County of Edessa   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-08-19)
Abstract: Brooks: Baldwin of Boulogne and the County of Edessa
The County of Edessa was the first Latin Kingdom to be established during the First Crusade, and its founding was instrumental in the future successes that the Franks were to enjoy in the region.
Edessa was an Armenian territory under the nominal protection of the Byzantine Empire, and the appearance of Baldwin and his soldiers radically altered the religious and political makeup of the realm.
brown.edu /Departments/Medieval_Studies/Conference/abstracts/brooks.htm   (239 words)

  
 County of Edessa   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-08-19)
The County of Edessa was one of the Crusader states in the 12th century.
Later in 1104, Edessa was attacked by Mosul, and both Baldwin and Joscelin were taken prisoner when they were defeated at the fortress of Harran.
Joscelin continued to rule in his lands west of the Euphrates, centered around Turbessel, until 1149, when he was captured in battle by Zengi's son Nur ad-Din, and soon died.
www.theezine.net /c/county-of-edessa.html   (687 words)

  
 Baldwin III of Jerusalem Information - TextSheet.com
At the beginning of his reign the Byzantine Empire was attempting to impose its influence over the Principality of Antioch in Cilicia, and Zengi of Mosul had invaded the County of Edessa.
In 1149, after the failure of the crusade, Baldwin III appeared in Antioch as regent after the fall of Raymund, the husband of the princess Constance, daughter of Bohemund II of Antioch.
He tried to renew the truce with Damascus, and was forced to cede the last remnant of the County of Edessa, Tel-bashir, to Byzantine emperor Manuel I Comnenus.
www.medbuster.com /encyclopedia/b/ba/baldwin_iii_of_jerusalem.html   (666 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Principality of Antioch
Baldwin of Boulogne (died 1118), count of Edessa (1098—1100), then the second monarch and first titled king of Jerusalem (1100—1118), was the brother of Godfrey of Bouillon, son of Eustace II of Boulogne.
The Siege of Edessa took place from November 28 to December 24, 1144, resulting in the fall of the majority of the crusader County of Edessa to Zengi, the atabeg of Mosul.
It extended around the northeastern edge of the Mediterranean Sea, bordering on the County of Tripoli to the south, Edessa to the east, and the Byzantine Empire or the Kingdom of Armenia to the northwest, depending on the date.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Principality-of-Antioch   (5663 words)

  
 EDESSA
It is situated on a limestone ridge, an extension of the ancient Mount Masius in the Taurus mountains of southern Anatolia, where the east-west highway from Zeugma (in the vicinity of modern Birecik) on the Euphrates to the Tigris met the north-south route from Samosata (Somaysa@tá) to the Euphrates via Carrhae (H®arra@n).
The fact that coins were minted at Edessa under Antiochus IV suggests a degree of autonomy and importance in the Seleucid period.
In 492-538/1097-1144 the city was the capital of the Crusader county of Edessa.
www.iranica.com /articles/v8/v8f2/v8f205.html   (1038 words)

  
 Articles - Second Crusade   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-08-19)
A fourth, the County of Tripoli, was established in 1109.
Edessa was the most northerly of these, and also the weakest and least populated; as such, it was subject to frequent attacks from the surrounding Muslim states ruled by the Ortoqids, Danishmends, and Seljuk Turks.
Joscelin II continued to rule the remnants of the county from Turbessel, but little by little the rest of the territory was captured or sold to the Byzantines.
www.nowize.com /articles/Second_Crusade   (3684 words)

  
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Edessa
Among the illustrious disciples of the School of Edessa special mention is due to Bardesanes (154-222), a schoolfellow of Abgar IX, the originator of Christian religious poetry, whose teaching was continued by his son Harmonius and his disciples.
A Christian council was held at Edessa as early as 197 (Euseb., Hist.
It was retaken by the Arabs, and then successivelly held by the Greeks, the Seljuk Turks (1087), the Crusaders (1099), who established there the "county" of Edessa and kept the city till 1144, when it was again captured by the Turk Zengui, and most of its inhabitants were slaughtered together with the Latin archbishop.
www.newadvent.org /cathen/05282a.htm   (1287 words)

  
 Second Crusade   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-08-19)
The Second Crusade was the second major crusade launched from Europe, called in 1145 in response to the fall of the County of Edessa the previous year.
Edessa was the first of the Crusader states to have been founded during the First Crusade (1096–1099), and was the first to fall.
The news of the fall of Edessa was brought back to Europe first by pilgrims early in 1145, and then by embassies from Antioch, Jerusalem, and Armenia.
www.abitabouteverything.com /files/s/se/second_crusade.html   (3738 words)

  
 Articles - Edessa, Mesopotamia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-08-19)
The name under which Edessa figures in cuneiform inscriptions is unknown; the later native name was Osroe, after its purported founder (who was probably only legend), this being the Armenian form for Chosroes; it became in Syriac Ourhoï, in Armenian Ourhaï in Arabic Er Roha, commonly Orfa or Sanli Urfa, its present name.
Edessa was at first more or less under the protectorate of the Parthians, then of Tigranes of Armenia, then from the time of Pompey under the Romans.
Traces of Hellenistic culture were soon overwhelmed in Edessa, whose dynasty employs Syriac legends on their coinage, save the Roman client-king Abgar IX (179-214), and there is a corresponding lack of Greek public inscriptions (Bauer 1971, ch.
www.gaple.com /articles/Edessa,_Mesopotamia   (1257 words)

  
 Second Crusade - Linix Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-08-19)
It was called in response to the fall of the County of Edessa in 1144, but by 1148 it had ended in failure.
The Second Crusade was the first of the crusades to be led by European kings, namely Louis VII of France and Conrad III of Germany.
After the First Crusade and the Crusade of 1101 there were three crusader states established in the east: the Kingdom of Jerusalem, the Principality of Antioch, and the County of Edessa.
web.linix.ca /pedia/index.php/Second_Crusade   (3641 words)

  
 Yahoo! Search Results for edessa
Edessa stands on the Silk Road, which begins on the Mediterranean coast at one of the Seleucid capitals, Antioch; passes...
The County of Edessa was one of the Crusader states in the 12th century, in a city...
Edessa is located in the southeastern opening of this mountain ring...
www.best-top.ro /banner/www_materialedeconstructii_tk_200501091458   (424 words)

  
 Zengi   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-08-19)
Damascus allied with the Crusader Kingdom of Jerusalem against him, and he was unable to take the city.
In 1144 Zengi besieged the Crusader County of Edessa.
Edessa was the weakest and least Latinized Crusader state, and Zengi captured it on December 24, 1144.
www.enlightenweb.net /z/ze/zengi.html   (193 words)

  
 Edesa - EDESA intro.
The name under which Edessa figures in cuneiform inscriptions is unknown; the native name was Osroe, after some the town, 303 called it Edessa, in memory of the ancient capital.
Edessa retained its importance during the early Christian.
INTRODUCTION Edessa stands on the Silk Road, which begins on the Mediterranean coast at one of the Seleucid capitals, Antioch; passes.
www.destarter.com /edessa/edesa.html   (352 words)

  
 County of Edessa   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-08-19)
The County of Edessa was different from the other Crusader states in that it was landlocked.
It was remote from the other states and was not on particularly good terms with its closest neighbor, the Principality of Antioch.
Half of the county, including its capital, was located to the east of the Euphrates and hence far to the east of the others.
www.worldhistory.com /wiki/C/County-of-Edessa.htm   (1032 words)

  
 Joscelin I of Edessa - Encyclopedia Glossary Meaning Explanation Joscelin I of Edessa
Joscelin I of Edessa - Encyclopedia Glossary Meaning Explanation Joscelin I of Edessa.
Joscelin of Courtenay or Joscelin I ruled over the County of Edessa during its zenith, from 1118 to 1131.
When Ghazi heard of Joscelin's approach, perhaps mistakenly believing him already dead, he lifted the siege and retreated, and thus the warrior prince won a final battle before dying shortly thereafter on the roadside.
www.encyclopedia-glossary.com /en/Joscelin-I-of-Edessa.html   (283 words)

  
 Principality of Antioch - Linix Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-08-19)
Unlike Baldwin in Edessa, who was already a count in France, Bohemund did not hold the title of prince in Europe, but this did not deter the creation of a Principality.
Meanwhile, an unknown epidemic spread throughout the Crusader camp; Adhemar of Le Puy was one of the victims.
Baibars finally took the city in 1268, and all of northern Syria was quickly lost; twenty-three years later, Acre was taken, and the Crusader states ceased to exist.
web.linix.ca /pedia/index.php/Principality_of_Antioch   (1362 words)

  
 Joscelin   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-08-19)
Joscelin of Courtenay or Joscelin I ruled over the County of Edessa during its zenith, from 1118 to east of Aleppo, a sapper's mine collapsed and Joscelin was gravely injured.
To enjoy pleasure in pain, finding love with Joscelin, who knew from the beginning what she was condemned as an oath breaker, Joscelin has never violated the central precept.
Was attacked by Mosul, and both Baldwin and Joscelin were taken prisoner when they were defeated at the became regent in Edessa, until Baldwin and Joscelin were ransomed in 1107.
www.99hosted.com /names2440.html   (403 words)

  
 County of Edessa Details, Meaning County of Edessa Article and Explanation Guide
County of Edessa Details, Meaning County of Edessa Article and Explanation Guide
County of Edessa Guide, Meaning, Facts, Information and Description
This is an Article on County of Edessa.
www.e-paranoids.com /c/co/county_of_edessa.html   (747 words)

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