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Topic: Courtesy title


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  Courtesy title - Facts, Information, and Encyclopedia Reference article
A courtesy title is a form of address in the British peerage system used for wives, children, and other close relatives of a peer.
The title used does not have to be exactly equivalent to the actual peerage: the eldest son of the current Duke of Wellington uses the title "Marquess of Douro", even though the actual peerage possessed by his father is "Marquess Douro".
Another form of courtesy title, in the form of an honorific prefix, is granted to younger sons, and all daughters of peers.
www.startsurfing.com /encyclopedia/c/o/u/Courtesy_title.html   (1460 words)

  
 Courtesy Titles
A peer's wife and children are granted the use of certain titles, depending upon the rank of the peer.
His subordinate titles are distributed by courtesy only to his direct heirs, that is, his eldest son, and his eldest son's eldest son, etc. The Duke of Devonshire's eldest son bears by courtesy the title the Marquess of Hartington, and Lord Hartington's eldest son (b.
And her husband, the earl, did not become Duke of Marlborough by courtesy; he remained a mere earl (much like the husband of a queen is not a king by courtesy).
www.chinet.com /~laura/html/titles05.html   (3714 words)

  
  Title Guaranty > Frequently Asked Questions
Title insurance is your policy of protection against loss that may result in a claim against your ownership of the property.
Prior to August 15, 2001, title insurance did not transfer to trusts and a new policy was necessary if the property was to be held by the trust.
Courtesy closings are closings that are settled through Title Guaranty for a property in a county other than Los Alamos, but Title Guaranty does not issue the title insurance.
www.titleguarantynm.com /faqs   (0 words)

  
  Courtesy title
Titles with the same name as a peer's main title are also not used as courtesy titles.
The title used does not have to be exactly equivalent to the actual peerage: the eldest son of the current Duke of Wellington uses the title "Marquess of Douro", even though the actual peerage possessed by his father is "Marquess Douro".
Another form of courtesy title, in the form of an honorific prefix, is granted to younger sons, and all daughters of peers.
www.guajara.com /wiki/en/wikipedia/c/co/courtesy_title.html   (664 words)

  
 Website design: Courtesy titles and salutations
The most usual use of a title on usenet was to offend someone in a flamewar.
Titles of nobility are also banned in Canada as well as in many republics and their use can cause major diplomatic rows involving heads of state.
By having a limited subset of titles, you offend everyone whose title is not on the list, who speaks a different language, who has more than one or whose salutation does not conform to the standard formula.
www.siliconglen.com /usability/courtesytitles.html   (3023 words)

  
  Times-Tribune Stylebook - Appendix V   (Site not responding. Last check: )
It is the newspaper's policy to use appropriate courtesy titles on second and subsequent references in local news and features stories, including obits and news stories that involve sports figures (as opposed to sports stories).
Courtesy titles should be used to show respect to our newsmakers and our readers.
We will extend courtesy titles to people accused and convicted of crimes, however when the crime is particularly heinous the courtesy title may be left out in the judgment of the editor (for example, Mr.
www.scrantontimestribune.com /resources/stylebookcourtesy.shtml   (742 words)

  
  titles. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Napoleon assumed the title of emperor of the French in 1804, and Queen Victoria was proclaimed empress of India in 1877.
The title of viscount, formerly that of a county sheriff, became a degree of honor and was made hereditary in the reign of Henry VI.
Titles of the hereditary imperial nobility conferred on members of the imperial house were of 12 degrees, or lines of descent.
www.bartleby.com /65/ti/titles.html   (1530 words)

  
  Encyclopedia: Courtesy title
Marquess of Queensberry is a title in the peerage of Scotland.
Marquess of Aberdeen and Temair is a title in the Scottish peerage.
The title Earl of Eglinton is a peerage title in the Peerage of Scotland.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Courtesy-title   (7140 words)

  
 Courtesy title   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The title used does not have to be exactly equivalent to the actual peerage: the eldest son of the current Duke of Wellington uses the title " Marquess of Douro ", even though the actual peerage possessed by his father is "Marquess Douro".
Another form of courtesy title, in the form of an honorific prefix, is granted to younger sons, and all daughters of peers.
Note that a peer's daughter that marries a commoner retains her courtesy title (substituting her husband's surname for the maiden name), but if she marries a peer, she gains the courtesy title as that peer's wife.
www.serebella.com /encyclopedia/article-Courtesy_title.html   (887 words)

  
 Honourable - LoveToKnow 1911
The title of "honourable" is in the United Kingdom, except by special licence of the Crown (e.g.
The eldest sons of dukes, marquesses and earls bear "by courtesy" their father's second title, the younger sons of dukes and marquesses having the courtesy title Lord prefixed to their Christian name; while the daughters of dukes, marquesses and earls are styled Lady.
The title of "honourable" is also given to all present or past maids of honour, and to the judges of the high court being lords justices or lords of appeal (who are "right honourable").
www.1911encyclopedia.org /Honourable   (683 words)

  
 Search Results for "courtesy"   (Site not responding. Last check: )
...as an obligation in the absence of a treaty, and although a state may, as a matter of courtesy, refuse asylum to a fugitive and honor a request for extradition, virtually...
Richard de Beauchamp was a man of piety and courtesy and was famed throughout Europe as a chivalrous knight.
...title Furst (prince) was below that of duke; there existed also the title Prinz, which was a courtesy title extended to various persons, notably the sons of a duke...
www.bartleby.com /cgi-bin/texis/webinator/sitesearch?query=courtesy&db=db&filter=col65&Submit=Go   (269 words)

  
 Courtesy title   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The title used does not have to be exactly equivalent to the actual peerage: the eldest son of the current Duke of Wellington uses the title " Marquess of Douro ", even thoughthe actual peerage possessed by his father is "Marquess Douro".
Another form of courtesy title, in the form of an honorific prefix, is grantedto younger sons, and all daughters of peers.
Also note that the children of apeeress in her own right (a peeress that holds a substantive title, and is not merely a wife of a peer) gain courtesy titles asusual, but the husband receives no special distinction.
www.therfcc.org /courtesy-title-193525.html   (648 words)

  
 Titles - Lyorn Records - a Wikia wiki   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The title of a spouse, or other family member may be used as a courtesy title.
Also, a title may be used even if the associated lands have been lost, so long as no one else is using the title.
Paarfi also seems to use the title of knight, but I would hesitate to generalize from him to the rest of the House of the Hawk.
dragaera.wikia.com /wiki/Titles   (440 words)

  
 Courtesy title   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Another form of courtesy title in the of an honorific prefix is granted to younger sons all daughters of peers.
Note that a peer's daughter that marries commoner retains her courtesy title (substituting her surname for the maiden name) but if marries a peer she gains the courtesy as that peer's wife.
Also note that children of a peeress in her own (a peeress that holds a substantive title is not merely a wife of a gain courtesy titles as usual but the receives no special distinction.
www.freeglossary.com /Courtesy_title   (942 words)

  
 courtesy title - Hutchinson encyclopedia article about courtesy title   (Site not responding. Last check: )
For example, the eldest son of a duke, marquess, or earl may bear one of his father's lesser titles; thus the duke of Marlborough's son is the marquess of Blandford.
The daughters of dukes, marquesses, and earls are entitled to bear the style of ‘Lady’ before their forename, and the daughters of viscounts and barons that of ‘Hon’; they may retain these titles if they marry men of lower rank.
The adopted sons and daughters of peers may not use courtesy titles, nor may they inherit a peerage from their adoptive parent.
encyclopedia.farlex.com /courtesy+title   (343 words)

  
 CoquetteNet | Sensibility: Titles of Rank   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The eldest son is referred to by the title of the second highest peerage held under the Duke; i.e.: Marquess.
The younger sons are given the courtesy title of "Lord".
The sons are referred to by the title of "Lord".
www.coquette.net /sensibility/rank.html   (108 words)

  
 Titles of Nobility of the Hereditary Knights Templar   (Site not responding. Last check: )
They would meet in secret, often at different locations and maintain their hereditary “Titles of nobility” through their ancestral direct line, that is from father to son, or grandfather to grandson, except in such instances in which descent also included the female line where no male line existed.
Providing that the use of Titles are for lawful purposes the use of Titles are at the discretion of the holders.
Granted Titles or "Offices of Nobility" held of the Order are equivalent to high ranking appointments in religious churches like ´Arch Bishop of Canterbury´, and as such they often come with fringe benefits of diplomatic status, and tax exemption in certain cases.
www.nobility.co.uk /templar/titles.htm   (1101 words)

  
 The K-Zone: The titles game: can you buy nobility?
People that held courtesy titles are entitled to be addressed by those titles, or the honorifics that go with them, but courtesy titles are not titles in their own right, and cannot be inherited.
Of particular interest to title merchants are the titles of `Lord of the Manor', which is generally believed to fall on the non-noble side of the line, and Scottish title of Baron, which is generally believed to be a true noble title (at least for now).
As far as obtaining a title is concerned, the only legitimate way to acquire the honorifics of `The Hon.', etc., is to be a peer of the realm, or a member of the immediate family of a peer of the realm, or a Privy Councillor.
www.kevinboone.com /PF_thetitlesgame.html   (6751 words)

  
 College Relations Office - Buffalo State College - Communication Standards and Policies - Editorial Style Guide - T
titles, academic—In general, capitalize an academic title when it immediately precedes a personal name and is thus used as part of the name (usually replacing the title holder’s first name).
Lowercase a title when it stands alone, follows a name, or is used as an identifier or occupational descriptor: President Howard; Muriel A. Howard, president of Buffalo State College; the provost; Judith A. Smith, professor of fine arts; Professor Smith; Harold Chasen, associate professor, Psychology Department; associate professor of music Michael Timmins.
titles, articles and features—Titles of articles and features in periodicals and newspapers, chapter titles, short-story titles, essays, and individual selections in books are set in roman type and enclosed in quotation marks: "Talk of the Town" in last week's New Yorker.
www.buffalostate.edu /collegerelations/x593.xml   (599 words)

  
 courtesy - definition by dict.die.net
Courtesying.] To make a respectful salutation or movement of respect; esp. (with reference to women), to bow the body slightly, with bending of the knes.
And trust thy honest-offered courtesy, With oft is sooner found in lowly sheds, With smoky rafters, than in tapestry walls And courts of princes, where it first was named, And yet is most pretended.
Courtesy title, a title assumed by a person, or popularly conceded to him, to which he has no valid claim; as, the courtesy title of Lord prefixed to the names of the younger sons of noblemen.
dict.die.net /courtesy   (233 words)

  
 Articles - Courtesy title   (Site not responding. Last check: )
If a peer of the rank of Duke, Marquess or Earl has more than one title, his eldest son, not himself a peer, uses one of the lesser titles; that title is only "loaned" to him - technically the son actually remains a commoner.
An Heir Presumptive has no right to use the courtesy title, since it is not certain that he will in time inherit the substantive title.
However, in 2003, Ashley was granted by Warrant of Precedence from the Queen Elizabeth II the style and precedence of the son of a baron, becoming The Honourable Ashley Ponsonby.
www.lastring.com /articles/Courtesy_title   (1458 words)

  
 The British Royals Message Board: Courtesy Titles   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Perhaps this is what has led to the confusion regarding the titles of eldest sons of earls (most of whom appear to have courtesy titles of viscount/baron).
The reason for my asking is that the children of Prince Michael bear the title Lord/Lady -- which is the exact same as borne by their cousins (children of their father's older brother, the Duke), with the eldest bearing the courtesy title Earl of St. Andrews.
The reason for : my asking is that the children of Prince : Michael bear the title Lord/Lady -- which is : the exact same as borne by their cousins : (children of their father's older brother, : the Duke), with the eldest bearing the : courtesy title Earl of St. Andrews.
members3.boardhost.com /Warholm/msg/1175899322.html   (847 words)

  
 White Courtesy Telephone
I am so very happy to be invited to write for the White Telephone of Courtesy, and especially to comment on the post-capitalist discourse of ARNOVA members.
I think the title of “white courtesy” gives the impression that there is something else possible like “fl courtesy”—i.e.
She describes herself as being in a superposition of affective eigenstates: while it’s true that she feels “put off,” she simultaneously postpones her feelings of offense as she considers an ironic reading of “white courtesy.” She is put off, but she is not quite yet put off.
postcards.typepad.com /white_telephone   (7716 words)

  
 Vision Title & Closing Services, LLC
Our motto is "Your Vision is our Vision" because we believe the customer comes first and we continually honor this by offering
the utmost in professionalism and courtesy from our staff, and accommodating closing locations.
We handle closings onsite throughout Massachusetts, New Hampshire and Maine.
www.visiontc.com   (198 words)

  
 Florida Title Insurance - Closing Day
During which time, your title closer will explain each of the documents that you will be required to sign.
The Funding number allows the money to be transferred from the lender to the Federal Reserve, then finally to Kampf Title, at which time Kampf Title can disburse all money to the respective parties.
The keys will then be given to the buyer and the buyer takes physical possesion/ownership of the property.
www.kampftitle.com /closingday/closingday.html   (0 words)

  
 Courtesy Titles
A peer's wife and children are granted the use of certain titles, depending upon the rank of the peer.
His subordinate titles are distributed by courtesy only to his direct heirs, that is, his eldest son, and his eldest son's eldest son, etc. The Duke of Devonshire's eldest son bears by courtesy the title the Marquess of Hartington, and Lord Hartington's eldest son (b.
And her husband, the earl, did not become Duke of Marlborough by courtesy; he remained a mere earl (much like the husband of a queen is not a king by courtesy).
laura.chinet.com /html/titles05.html   (3714 words)

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