Factbites
 Where results make sense
About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   PR   |   Contact us  

Topic: Critias


Related Topics

In the News (Fri 26 Apr 19)

  
  Critias [Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy]
Critias was released on the testimony of Andocides (On the Mysteries 47) in the course of the investigation of the crime, and nothing further is known of his involvement in the matter.
Whatever plans that Critias and the Thirty had for the establishment of a new oligarchic regime in Athens were abruptly halted by the military successes of a group of pro-democratic exiles led by Thrasybulus at the Athenian border post at Phyle and in the port town of Piraeus.
Critias believed that law, order, and the divine are merely human creations that function as tyrants over humanity--thus, morality is relative to the individual and a trained, noble character should be regarded as superior to any law.
www.utm.edu /research/iep/c/critias.htm   (3521 words)

  
 Plato's Critias
Critias proposes to speak of these rival powers first of all, giving to Athens the precedence; the various tribes of Greeks and barbarians who took part in the war will be dealt with as they successively appear on the scene.
CRITIAS: And I, Timaeus, accept the trust, and as you at first said that you were going to speak of high matters, and begged that some forbearance might be shown to you, I too ask the same or greater forbearance for what I am about to say.
CRITIAS: Friend Hermocrates, you, who are stationed last and have another in front of you, have not lost heart as yet; the gravity of the situation will soon be revealed to you; meanwhile I accept your exhortations and encouragements.
www.ancienttexts.org /library/greek/plato/critias.html   (5588 words)

  
 Critias, Greece, ancient history
The rule was one of terror, and Critias has gone to history as one of the ultimate villains.
Critias was born into an aristocratic family, and was educated by the likes of Socrates and the Sophists.
Apart from being a villain, though, Critias was intelligent and cultural and wrote prose, tragedies and lyric poetry.
www.in2greece.com /english/historymyth/history/ancient/critias.htm   (292 words)

  
 Critias. Cosmos of the Greek Philosophers
When Critias ceased the power and became one of the thirty tyrants, his rule was so terrible that he more than well earned the title.
Critias claimed that the gods had been consciously invented, to frighten the people into obedience and a law-abiding life.
The perspective of Critias is strictly political, another force in society than that of man himself he does not recognize.
www.stenudd.com /myth/greek/critias.htm   (622 words)

  
 Truth, Lies and History in Plato's Timaeus-Critias
Critias and Timaeus tell their stories in response to Socrates' request to be entertained in return for the entertainment he provided yesterday, which was an account of an ideal city very similar to that of the Republic.
Critias claims that his account is not subject to the usual Greek ignorance of the past because it comes from Egypt.
Critias' elaborate demonstration of his sources and their authority certainly suggests the use of a critical historical method to reconstruct a set of historical events.
www.dur.ac.uk /Classics/histos/1998/johansen.html   (9982 words)

  
 Absolute Anime / Yu-Gi-Oh! / Sir Critias
Critias Knight is one of the 3 Legendary Knights that appear in the battle against Dartz.
Critias Knight is the true form of the Legendary Dragon Critias and surprisingly enough looks just like Joey although it's Kaiba who recently owned The Fang of Critias.
Critias Knight's effect is when the opponent's monster attacks it as a target the player can select a trap card from their graveyard and set it up on their side of the field and they can also activate the trap card in the same turn.
www.absoluteanime.com /yu-gi-oh/critias_knight.htm   (210 words)

  
 Detail Page
Critias was an elder kinsman of the philosopher Plato (specifically, cousin to Plato's mother) and was also the uncle and guardian of Plato's uncle Charmides.
Critias directed the Thirty's reign of terror, executing anyone who was likely to organize resistance or whose personal wealth was attractive.
Critias' crowning outrage was to arrange the mass execution of 300 men (probably the entire male citizen population) of the nearby town of Eleusis.
www.fofweb.com /Onfiles/Ancient/AncientDetail.asp?iPin=GRE0149   (373 words)

  
 Critias - LoveToKnow 1911
CRITIAS, Athenian orator and poet, and one of the Thirty Tyrants.
Critias was a man of varied talents - poet, orator, historian and philosopher.
He was also the author of several tragedies and of biographies of distinguished poets (possibly in verse).
www.1911encyclopedia.org /Critias   (232 words)

  
 Critias - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Critias (Greek Κριτίας, 460-403 BC), was born in Athens, son of Callaeschrus, was the uncle of Plato, leading member of the Thirty Tyrants, and one of the most violent.
The Critias character in Plato's dialogues Timaeus and Critias is often identified as the son of Callaeschrus - but not by Plato; and given the old age of the Critias in these two dialogues, he must be the grandfather of the son of Callaeschrus.
Critias - Demades - Demetrius Phalereus - Demochares - Democles - Demosthenes
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Critias   (368 words)

  
 Atlantis: Timaeus and Critias
Timaeus and Critias, two of Plato's dialogues, are the only existing written records which specifically refer to Atlantis.
Critias learned of it from his grandfather also named Critias, son of Dropides.
This elder Critias told the story of Atlantis to his grandson, Critias, who then conveyed the story to Socrates in the dialogues.
www.activemind.com /Mysterious/Topics/Atlantis/timaeus_and_critias.html   (502 words)

  
 Critias (dialogue) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Critias, one of Plato's late dialogues, contains the story of the mighty island kingdom Atlantis and its attempt to conquer Athens, which failed due to the ordered society of the Athenians.
The elder Critias is unknown to have achieved any personal distinction, and since he died long before Plato published the Timaeus and Critias, it would have made no sense for Plato to choose a statesman to appear in these dialogues, who was practicly unknown and thus uninteresting to his contemporaries.
Critias then goes into a great deal of detail in describing the island of Atlantis and the Temple to Poseidon and Cleito on the island, and refers to the legendary metal orichalcum.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Critias_(dialogue)   (1251 words)

  
 Classics in the History of Psychology -- Plato's Timaeus Part 1
Critias: Then listen, Socrates, to a tale which, though strange, is certainly true, having been attested by Solon, who was the wisest of the seven sages.
Critias: I will tell an old-world story which I heard from an aged man; for Critias, at the time of telling it, was as he said, nearly ninety years of age, and I was about ten.
For which reason the sea in those parts is impassable and impenetrable, because there is a shoal of mud in the way; and this was caused by the subsidence of the island.
psychclassics.yorku.ca /Plato/Timaeus/timaeus1.htm   (6266 words)

  
 World Mysteries - Mystic Places - Atlantis
CRITIAS -- And I, Timaeus, accept the trust, and as you at first said that you were going to speak of high matters, and begged that some forbearance might be shown to you, I too ask the same or greater forbearance for what I am about to say.
SOCRATES -- Certainly, Critias, we will grant your request, and we will grant the same by anticipation to Hermocrates, as well as to you and Timaeus; for I have no doubt that when his turn comes a little while hence, he will make the same request which you have made.
CRITIAS -- Friend Hermocrates, you, who are stationed last and have another in front of you, have not lost heart as yet; the gravity of the situation will soon be revealed to you; meanwhile I accept your exhortations and encouragements.
www.world-mysteries.com /mpl_10_1.htm   (3224 words)

  
 Plato's Atlantis Dialogues
The epic saga of the mighty empire of Atlantis and the honorable empire of the Hellenes was revealed in conversations between Critias, Hermocrates, Timaeus and Socrates which took place in ancient Greece, circa 400 BC.
During this conversation Critias recited an ancient unfinished poem, which he had memorized when he was a child.
This poem was written by Solon, known as the law-maker of Athens and the wisest of the seven sages of Greece.
atlantis-today.com /Atlantis_Critias_Timaeus.htm   (6744 words)

  
 The Internet Classics Archive | Critias by Plato
And I, Timaeus, accept the trust, and as you at first said that you were going to speak of high matters, and begged that some forbearance might be shown to you, I too ask the same or greater forbearance for what I am about to say.
Certainly, Critias, we will grant your request, and we will grant the same by anticipation to Hermocrates, as well as to you and Timaeus; for I have no doubt that when his turn comes a little while hence, he will make the same request which you have made.
Friend Hermocrates, you, who are stationed last and have another in front of you, have not lost heart as yet; the gravity of the situation will soon be revealed to you; meanwhile I accept your exhortations and encouragements.
classics.mit.edu /Plato/critias.html   (3222 words)

  
 Atlantis, lost sunken city
Plato further claims that the tale was heard by Critias’ grandfather, and is being retold by Critias in the dialogue.
In the dialogues Timaeus and Critias, Plato outlines his ideas on Mankind, society, history and their relationship to the Cosmos from a philosophical and theological perspective.
However, Critias says "My father had his [Solon’s] manuscript, which is now in my possession, and I studied it often as a child." (Critias, 113.) If this is true, then a translation would have been available to Herodotus.
www.wrexhamparaskeptics.4t.com /atlantis.htm   (2484 words)

  
 Plato's Critias - the story of Atlantis   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-17)
Critias: Then listen, Socrates, to a strange tale, which is, however, certainly true, as Solon, who was the wisest of the seven sages, declared.
Critias: I will tell an old-world story which I heard from an aged man; for Critias (the elder) was, as he said, at that time nearly ninety years of age, and I was about ten years of age.
Now the day was that day of the Apaturia which is called the registration of youth; at which, according to custom, our parents gave prizes for recitations, and the poems of several poets were recited by us boys, and many of us sung the poems of Solon, which were new at the time.
ascendingpassage.com /plato-atlantis-critias.htm   (1238 words)

  
 Timaeus & Critias
The Timaeus and Critias cannot even be properly dated, and what appears to have been planned as a trilogy exists only as one and half dialogues.
While it is generally believed that Atlantis's punishment was its destruction, the Critias seems to imply that the gods' first punishment for the Atlanteans was encouraging war between Athens and Atlantis.
Not only the Timaeus and Critias dialogues, but the very absence of a Hermocrates dialogue, may be products of this failure; Hermocrates, it is believed, was intended to take the cosmic assertions of the Timaeus and the ancient, lost history of the Critias, and bring the story into the present, dealing with current issues.
www2.kenyon.edu /Depts/IPHS/Projects/Stella/Plato.htm   (1867 words)

  
 Plato, Critias ToC: The Online Library of Liberty   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-17)
Steph. 106Timaeus concludes with a prayer that his words may be acceptable to the God whom he has revealed, and Critias, whose Steph. 107turn follows, begs that a larger measure of indulgence may be conceded to him, because he has to speak of men whom we know Steph. 108and not of gods whom we do not know.
And now having offered my prayer I deliver up the argument to Critias, who is to speak next according to our agreement1.
Critias asks for greater indulgence than was shown to Timaeus on the ground that it is easier to speak well of the Gods, whom we do not
oll.libertyfund.org /Home3/HTML.php?recordID=0344   (6276 words)

  
 The Critias fragment - ExChristian.Net - Articles
AD) assumes that "Critias" is the same Critias as Plato's uncle, the leader of the Thirty tyrants who ruled Athens briefly at the end of the Peloponnesian War.
This citation is generally taken to be an extract from a tragedy or satirical drama called Sisyphus, a discourse placed in the mouth of one of its characters.
If the historical Critias is its source, then this document goes back to the 5th century B.C. In any case, it probably reflects ideas of approximately that time.
exchristian.net /exchristian/2004/10/critias-fragment.php   (548 words)

  
 Critias
Critias, 460-403 BC, was the uncle of Plato, leading member of the Thirty Tyrants, and one of the most violent.
He was killed in a battle on the hill of Munychia when Thrasybulus seized the Piraeus, and managed to defeat the oligarchs.
Critias is also a work by Plato, see Critias (Plato).
www.mlahanas.de /Greeks/Bios/Critias.html   (271 words)

  
 Study of the "Timaeus" & "Critias"- AR Group's Cooperative Look - Atlantis Rising
On page 1 of the Timaeus quote, Critias is saying his presentation of the Athens/Atlantis story will be a hymn of praise to the Goddess on the occasion of her Panathenaea festival.
Also, since, in Critias, special note is made that Solon's account was much longer, and that Critias itself is a relatively short dialogue, we might also be safe in assuming that there has always been more Atlantis/Athens account that we are not seeing, nor have we ever seen.
I forewarn you, however, my dear Critias, of the mind of your audience,--how that [=due to the way in which] the former poet [Critias the Elder] won marvellous applause from it, so that you will require an extraordinary measure of indulgence if you are to prove capable of following in his steps.
forums.atlantisrising.com /ubb/Forum1/HTML/000953.html   (8243 words)

  
 Amazon.com: Timaeus and Critias (Penguin Classics): Books: Plato,Desmond Lee   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-17)
In the Timaeus he explores the origin of Earth by means of a dialogue between Socrates and Timaeus and in the Critias, also a dialogue, he writes about the myth of Atlantis.
Critias gets a reputable monologue recounting the fate of Atlantis (p.20) before handing off to Timaeus (perhaps Timaios, a Pythagoran), the astronomy expert, who handles, with a line or two of encouragement from Socrates (p.29), the entire piece to its end.
Perhaps it was living in the shadows of the persecution, trial, and subsequent execution of Socrates that allowed Plato to lift his eyes to focus on `The Forms'.
www.amazon.com /Timaeus-Critias-Penguin-Classics-Plato/dp/0140442618   (3202 words)

  
 Critias
Certainly, Critias, we will grant your request, and we will grant the same by anticipation to Hermocrates, as well as to you and Timaeus ; for I have no doubt that when his turn comes a little while hence, he will make the same request which you have made.
But remember, Critias, that faint heart never yet raised a trophy ; and therefore you must go and attack the argument like a man. First invoke Apollo and the Muses, and then let us hear you sound the praises and show forth the virtues of your ancient citizens.
Friend Hermocrates, you, who are stationed last and have another in front of you, have not lost heart as yet ; the gravity of the situation will soon be revealed to you ; meanwhile I accept your exhortations and encouragements.
www.ac-nice.fr /philo/textes/Plato-Works/26-Critias.htm   (3132 words)

  
 Critias (tr. Benjamin Jowett) by Plato
Critias returns to his story, professing only to repeat what Solon was told
CRITIAS: And I, Timaeus, accept the trust, and as you at first said that
I am right in asking, I hope that you will be ready to grant.
encyclopediaindex.com /b/criti10.htm   (8905 words)

Try your search on: Qwika (all wikis)

Factbites
  About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   Press   |   Contact us  
Copyright © 2005-2007 www.factbites.com Usage implies agreement with terms.