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Topic: Crito


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  Plato - Dialogues - 13. Crito   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-13)
Crito: I should not have liked myself, Socrates, to be in such great trouble and unrest as you are--indeed I should not: I have been watching with amazement your peaceful slumbers; and for that reason I did not awake you, because I wished to minimize the pain.
Crito: But you see, Socrates, that the opinion of the many must be regarded, for what is now happening shows that they can do the greatest evil to any one who has lost their good opinion.
Crito: Fear not--there are persons who are willing to get you out of prison at no great cost; and as for the informers they are far from being exorbitant in their demands--a little money will satisfy them.
www.classicallibrary.org /plato/dialogues/13_Crito.htm   (3976 words)

  
 Plato -- The Crito, trans. by Jowett
Crito: I come to bring you a message which is sad and painful; not, as I believe, to yourself but to all of us who are your friends, and saddest of all to me.
Crito: No, the ship has not actually arrived, but she will probably be here to-day, as persons who have come from Sunium tell me that they have left her there; and therefore to-morrow, Socrates, will be the last day of your life.
Now you, Crito, are a disinterested person who are not going to die to-morrow- at least, there is no human probability of this, and you are therefore not liable to be de-ceived by the circumstances in which you are placed.
www.fred.net /tzaka/crito_txt.html   (3686 words)

  
 Online Guide to Ethics and Moral Philosophy
Crito told Socrates that plans were in place to prepare for his escape and journey to another country.
Yet, said Crito, the sun is still upon the hilltops, and many a one has taken the draught late, and after the announcement has been made to him, he has eaten and drunk, and indulged in sensual delights; do not hasten then, there is still time.
Crito, when he heard this, made a sign to the servant, and the servant went in, and remained for some time, and then returned with the jailer carrying a cup of poison.
caae.phil.cmu.edu /Cavalier/80130/part1/Preface/CritoAnalysis.html   (1096 words)

  
 The Hypertext Crito
THE CRITO seems intended to exhibit the character of Socrates in one light only, not as the philosopher, fulfilling a divine mission and trusting in the will of Heaven, but simply as the good citizen, who having been unjustly condemned is willing to give up his life in obedience to the laws of the State.
Socrates is afraid that Crito is but pressing upon him the opinions of the many: whereas, all his life long he has followed the dictates of reason only and the opinion of the one wise or skilled man. There was a time when Crito himself had allowed the propriety of this.
For example, Plato uses two metaphors in the Crito: first, the metaphor of possession by the gods as to why Socrates is compelled to act according to reason and die in Athens rather than flee; and second, the personification of the laws and the state.
philosophy.uoregon.edu /metaphor/crito.htm   (8384 words)

  
 Crito. Plato. 1909-14. The Apology, Phædo and Crito. The Harvard Classics
Why, Crito, when a man has reached my age he ought not to be repining at the prospect of death.
Dear Crito, your zeal is invaluable, if a right one; but if wrong, the greater the zeal the greater the evil; and therefore we ought to consider whether these things shall be done or not.
Now you, Crito, are a disinterested person who are not going to die to-morrow—at least, there is no human probability of this, and you are therefore not liable to be deceived by the circumstances in which you are placed.
www.bartleby.com /2/1/2.html   (3699 words)

  
 Crito - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
It is a conversation between Socrates and his wealthy friend Crito regarding justice ("dike"), injustice ("a-dike"), and the appropriate response to injustice ("anti-dike").
Crito agrees that while the meaning of the dream cannot be mistaken, he is concerned about losing a friend.
Crito says he agrees with Socrates, that "anti-dike" is as wrong as "a-dike", but in fact, neither seems to trouble him.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Crito   (1833 words)

  
 Crito - Plato - Free Online Library
Now you, Crito, are not going to die to-morrow--at least, there is no human probability of this, and therefore you are disinterested and not liable to be deceived by the circumstances in which you are placed.
The other considerations which you mention, of money and loss of character and the duty of educating one's children, are, I fear, only the doctrines of the multitude, who would be as ready to restore people to life, if they were able, as they are to put them to death--and with as little reason.
This, dear Crito, is the voice which I seem to hear murmuring in my ears, like the sound of the flute in the ears of the mystic; that voice, I say, is humming in my ears, and prevents me from hearing any other.
plato.thefreelibrary.com /Crito/2-1   (3968 words)

  
 Phil 320: Plato's Crito
[16] CRITO: No, the ship has not actually arrived, but she will probably be here to-day, as persons who have come from Sunium tell me that they have left her there; and therefore to-morrow, Socrates, will be the last day of your life.
[28] CRITO: But do you see, Socrates, that the opinion of the many must be regarded, as is evident in your own case, because they can do the very greatest evil to anyone who has lost their good opinion.
The other considerations which you mention, of money and loss of character, and the duty of educating children, are, as I hear, only the doctrines of the multitude, who would be as ready to call people to life, if they were able, as they are to put them to death--and with as little reason.
newton.uor.edu /facultyfolder/jeremy_anderson/teach/320z_crito.html   (3955 words)

  
 13. Plato, Crito
He tries to listen to Crito's arguments in favor of escape from prison, but they are drowned out by inner voices of "The Laws" accusing him for listening to thoughts about civil disobedience.
The Crito is the final social teaching of Socrates, and its message about values by agreement has relevance not only for Plato's Academy, where the primary studies turned to law and government, but also for later philosophy and social theory.
Crito was the same age as Socrates and perhaps his closest friend.
englishare.net /literature/POL-LDS-Crito.htm   (8066 words)

  
 Hauptli's Supplement on Plato's Crito
Crito is certainly no worse from a moral perspective than his peers.
Crito should be fully aware that there has been an "agreement" on Socrates' part to the punishment.
Of course, Crito should also be aware that this "agreement" was a carefully considered one that Plato's Socrates entered into fully consciously.
www.fiu.edu /~hauptli/Plato'sCritoLectureSupplement.html   (2384 words)

  
 NovelGuide: Crito: Novel Summary: Chapter 2
Crito enters the cell, depressed himself at the prospect of Socrates' unjust death.
Next, Crito grudgingly tells Socrates that the ship from Delos is approaching, marking the end of an annual Athenian celebration that prohibits political executions for the several weeks of its duration.
He begins by convincing Crito that the advice of one "expert" individual, namely God, should be heeded much more than the advice of countless ignorant people, namely Athens' as a whole.
www.novelguide.com /crito/summaries/chap2.html   (347 words)

  
 Crito introduction
In "Crito" and "Phaedo," with his trial over and done, Socrates is relaxed, almost serenely at peace in his jail cell, talking to friends.
This cheerful figure is not the agitated, confrontational Socrates of "Euthyphro" and "the Apology." In "Crito" Socrates awakens to a higher state of reconciliation, and in "Phaedo" (as we will see later) he prepares to enter the realm of the dead.
Crito has arranged for Socrates to live with friends in Thessaly, a city safely distant from Athens and (before St. Paul's arrival) noted for its devotion to food, drink and pleasures.
englishare.net /academic/plato-crito-introduction.htm   (491 words)

  
 [No title]
Now you, Crito, are a disinterested person who are not going to die to-morrow -- at least, there is no human probability of this, and you are therefore not liable to be deceived by the circumstances in which you are placed.
You had your choice, and might have gone either to Lacedaemon or Crete, which you often praise for their good government, or to some other Hellenic or foreign State.
Listen, then, to us and not to Crito." This is the voice which I seem to hear murmuring in my ears, like the sound of the flute in the ears of the mystic; that voice, I say, is humming in my ears, and prevents me from hearing any other.
www.constitution.org /pla/crito.txt   (3751 words)

  
 Crito   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-13)
Now you, Crito, are a disinterested person who is not going to die tomorrow-at least, there is no human probability of this, and you are therefore not liable to be deceived by the circumstances in which you are placed.
Be of good cheer, then, my dear Crito, and say that you are burying my body only, and do with that as is usual, and as you think best.
[8] Yet, said Crito, the sun is still upon the hilltops, and many a one has taken the draught late, and after the announcement has been made to him, he has eaten and drunk, and indulged in sensual delights; do not hasten then, there is still time.
users.anderson.edu /~farmenwj/LART/CritotB.htm   (4450 words)

  
 Crito   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-13)
The issue is whether Crito can persuade Socrates to escape as Crito and some of Socrates' other friends have arranged, or whether instead Socrates’; defense of fidelity to the law should prevail.
Crito, Socrates' friend, attempts to persuade Socrates to escape from prison by offering him reasons to do so and arguing that Socrates has no good reasons to refuse.
Crito and other friends of Socrates have made the necessary arrangements and Socrates can escape without risk if he chooses to do so.
webusers.xula.edu /rberman/Crito.htm   (1455 words)

  
 Plato, Crito
Why, Crito, when a man has reached my age he ought not to be repining at the approach of death.
Socrates, that the opinion of the many must be regarded, for what is now happening shows that they can do the greatest evil to any one who has lost their good opinion.
Fear not—there are persons who are willing to get you out of prison at no great cost; and as for the informers, they are far from being exorbitant in their demands—a little money will satisfy them.
thriceholy.net /Texts/Crito.html   (3662 words)

  
 Theology WebSite: Electronic Texts: Plato's Crito   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-13)
The personification of the Laws, and of their brethren the Laws in the world below, is one of the noblest and boldest figures of speech which occur in Plato.
CRITO: I come to bring you a message which is sad and painful; not, as I believe, to yourself, but to all of us who are your friends, and saddest of all to me. SOCRATES: What?
Listen, then, to us and not to Crito.' This, dear Crito, is the voice which I seem to hear murmuring in my ears, like the sound of the flute in the ears of the mystic; that voice, I say, is humming in my ears, and prevents me from hearing any other.
www.theologywebsite.com /etext/plato_crito.shtml   (4941 words)

  
 Socrates - Crito   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-13)
Socrates is a lifelong friend of Crito and so wants him to understand why he cannot escape.
This is a fourth premise of the argument.
Actually Socrates’; argument is finished, but Crito (who is a simple old man, who doesn’t want his friend to die) still doesn’t “get it”, so Socrates tells a story to explain the argument just made.
pressurecooker.phil.cmu.edu /80-250/guides/Socrates-Crito.html   (323 words)

  
 The Crito Group - Privacy Policy   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-13)
This website is administered by The Crito Group, Inc. The primary purpose of our website is to inform you about the services The Crito Group, Inc. provides the healthcare community, and to be a dynamic resource and business tool.
The Crito Group, Inc. believes that the responsible use of personal information collected on our website is critical to our business objectives and reputation.
In addition, The Crito Group, Inc. has technological and operational security policies and procedures in place to protect your personally identifiable information from loss, misuse, alteration or unintentional destruction.
www.critogroup.com /Privacy_main.html   (490 words)

  
 CRITO
There came to me the likeness of a woman, fair and comely, clothed in white raiment, who called to me and said: O Socrates- "The third day hence, to Phthia shalt thou go." Cr.
Now you, Crito, are a disinterested person who are not going to die to-morrow- at least, there is no human probability of this, and you are therefore not liable to be deceived by the circumstances in which you are placed.
Take a parallel instance; if, acting under the advice of men who have no understanding, we destroy that which is improvable by health and deteriorated by disease- when that has been destroyed, I say, would life be worth having?
www.sacred-texts.com /cla/plato/crito.htm   (3676 words)

  
 PHIL 401/501 Schedule and Course Guide
The Crito is a continuation of the dramatic portrayal of the Apology.
It depicts Socrates in prison awaiting his execution, and focuses on the attempts by his friend Crito to persuade him to make his escape from prison while he still has a chance.
Is Socrates' strict insistence upon obedience to the law in the Crito inconsistent with the refusal to obey the commands of rulers that he himself admits to in the Apology?
guweb2.gonzaga.edu /faculty/calhoun/courses/401/401guid.html   (14090 words)

  
 Center for Research on Information Technology and Organizations
The Center for Research on Information Technology and Organizations (CRITO) is a multidisciplinary research unit at the University of California, Irvine.
CRITO conducts theoretical and empirical research to answer a broad array of questions related to the use, impact, and management of information technology in organizations.
CRITO researchers pursue studies of the organizational implications of information technology, management of information technology, and technology policy and societal issues.
repositories.cdlib.org /crito   (135 words)

  
 The Last Days of Socrates   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-13)
Socrates had a modest amount of money and entrusted Crito, who was wise in the affairs of business, to invest it for him.
He appears in Plato's Euthydemus, Apology, Phaedo, and Crito.
In the Crito, he is a main character, and he attempts to convince Socrates to flee prison.
socrates.clarke.edu /aplg0241.htm   (63 words)

  
 Understanding Primary Sources: Plato's Crito   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-13)
Explain that Plato wrote an imaginary conversation, called a dialog, between Socrates and a friend, in which Socrates describes his reasons for not avoiding the death sentence.
Have students rewrite the excerpt from Plato's Crito in their own words, using the dialog form.
Have students read the entire Crito, and discuss the other reasons Socrates gave for not avoiding his death sentence.
www.eduplace.com /ss/hmss/6/unit/act5.1.html   (326 words)

  
 Crito
Reason #1 for Socrates to Escape: If he doesn't, people will think badly of his friends, who could have saved him.
C: … one must always pay attention to the opinion of the majority.
Returning to the Crito, we need to consider how plausible Socrates' position is.
www.ucs.mun.ca /~alatus/phil1200/Crito.html   (1203 words)

  
 Plato [Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy]
Some form of what is called "eudaimonism," that is, that goodness is to be understood in terms of conduciveness to human happiness, well-being, or flourishing, which may also be understood as "living well," or "doing well" (Crito 48b; Euthydemus 278e, 282a; Republic I. 354a);
The view that the citizen who has agreed to live in a state must always obey the laws of that state, or else persuade the state to change its laws, or leave the state (Crito 51b-c, 52a-d).
No one really knows what happens after death, but it is reasonable to think that death is not an evil; there may be an afterlife, in which the souls of the good are rewarded, and the souls of the wicked are punished (Apology 40c-41c; Crito 54b-c; Gorgias 523a-527a).
www.utm.edu /research/iep/p/plato.htm   (7918 words)

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