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Topic: Crown of Castile


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In the News (Tue 23 Apr 19)

  
 Aragon
On his wife's death, the crown of Castile passed to his daughter Joanna and her husband, Philip the Fair of Burgundy in 1506.
In 1406, upon the death of his elder brother King Henry III of Castile, Ferdinand declined the Castilian crown and instead, with Henry's widow Catherine, became coregent during the minority of his nephew John II of Castile.
The union of the Spanish kingdoms of Aragón and Castile was effected in 1469 by Ferdinand's marriage to his cousin Isabella I, queen of Castile.
website.lineone.net /~johnbidmead/aragon.htm

  
 WHKMLA : History of Aragon, 1479-1516
In 1474 Isabel succeeded to the crown of Castile, having to fend off a claim of Portuhal's King on behalf of his wife (1474-1476; peace concluded 1479).
In 1479, Ferdinand inherited the crown of Aragon; the union of Castile and Aragon helped Ferdinand establish his authority over Aragon (with Catalonia, Valencia).
Union of Aragon with Castile, from A History of Aragon and Catalonia by H.J. Chaytor
www.zum.de /whkmla/region/spain/aragon14791516.html   (425 words)

  
 CHAPTER FIFTEEN
Her husband pursued a policy of administrative dualism vis-a-vis Aragon and Castile (the creation of the Council of Aragon, 1494), while in Catalonia and the Crown of Aragon he consolidated the system of government by means of a contractual relationship.
Lured by the Mediterranean policy of the Catalan-Aragonese Crown, Castile adopted a course of action on the European problem that was diametrically opposed to that which she had followed during the Middle Ages ÷that is, the new course opposed the interests of France, her faithful ally since the time of the Trastámara King, Henry II.
Navarre did not, however, lose her distinctive regime ÷an exception to the policy of the Crown of Castile; her incorporation left her with the autonomy that had characterized the policy followed by the great monarchs of the House of Barcelona.
www.art.man.ac.uk /SPANISH/courses/sp2230/Vicens_ordering.html   (2085 words)

  
 A Brief History of Aragon.
Following the union of the crowns of Aragon and Castile, the common interests which linked the various states of the Crown of Aragon gradually dispersed, although there was no real union with Castile.
Aragon became in practice a province and its Coincil was absorbed into the Council of Castile.
At the beginning of the 9th century there was already a native count recognized by Charlemagne; thus emerged the County of Aragon which for a time came within the orbit of the Kingdom of Pamplona, but became emancipated from it, as a Kingdom, in the 11th century.
www.sispain.org /english/politics/autonomo/aragon/araghis.html   (2085 words)

  
 WHKMLA : History of Aragon, 1479-1516
In 1474 Isabel succeeded to the crown of Castile, having to fend off a claim of Portuhal's King on behalf of his wife (1474-1476; peace concluded 1479).
In 1479, Ferdinand inherited the crown of Aragon; the union of Castile and Aragon helped Ferdinand establish his authority over Aragon (with Catalonia, Valencia).
During the 15th century, Castile went through troublesome years, involving competition among claimants for the crown often dividing the country into hostile factions and at times resulting in civil war.
www.zum.de /whkmla/region/spain/aragon14791516.html   (2085 words)

  
 Essay or Coursework - How far was Spain unified by 1516?
In the economic sphere, the division of Castile and Aragon, despite the union of their monarchs, is even clearer.
However, one should note that many of these reforms were only carried out in Castile.
Aragon's traditional sphere of influence was in the Mediterranean.
www.coursework.info /i/25383.html   (302 words)

  
 The Spanish Inquisition
To the centre and north: a Christian Spain of some six million souls, divided politically into the crown of Castile (with two-thirds of the territory of the peninsula and three-quarters of the population) and the crown of Aragon (made up of the realms of Valencia, Aragon and Catalonia).
They were numerically insignificant in Castile, and in the crown of Aragon lived separately in their own communities, so that friction was minimal.
The crown accepted this policy because it seemed to ensure stability, but the new developments failed to bring about social unity, and the machinery of the Inquisition served only to intensify and deepen the shadow of conflict over Spain.
partners.nytimes.com /books/first/k/kamen-inquisition.html   (2469 words)

  
 Edward I, King of England to Dr. Levi Cheney (Including King Edward II and III)
In 1217 Ferdinand became King of Castile, which crown his mother renounced in his favour, and in 1230 he succeeded to the crown of Leon, though not without civil strife, since many were opposed to the union of the two kingdoms.
Gen 52-24 - Eleanor of Castile, Queen of England, Princess of Castile and Leon, Countess of Ponthiu; b.
He was the son of Alfonso IX, King of Leon, and of Berengeria, the daughter of Alfonso III, King of Castile, and sister of Blanche, the mother of St. Louis IX.
www.hannahdustin.com /short_ed.html   (14046 words)

  
 WHKMLA : History of Aragon, 1479-1516
During the 15th century, Castile went through troublesome years, involving competition among claimants for the crown often dividing the country into hostile factions and at times resulting in civil war.
In 1474 Isabel succeeded to the crown of Castile, having to fend off a claim of Portuhal's King on behalf of his wife (1474-1476; peace concluded 1479).
In 1479, Ferdinand inherited the crown of Aragon; the union of Castile and Aragon helped Ferdinand establish his authority over Aragon (with Catalonia, Valencia).
www.zum.de /whkmla/region/spain/aragon14791516.html   (14046 words)

  
 CHAPTER FIFTEEN
Lured by the Mediterranean policy of the Catalan-Aragonese Crown, Castile adopted a course of action on the European problem that was diametrically opposed to that which she had followed during the Middle Ages ÷that is, the new course opposed the interests of France, her faithful ally since the time of the Trastámara King, Henry II.
Navarre did not, however, lose her distinctive regime ÷an exception to the policy of the Crown of Castile; her incorporation left her with the autonomy that had characterized the policy followed by the great monarchs of the House of Barcelona.
Although the court indiscriminately employed Castilian and Aragonese men and resources to achieve its objectives, the discovery of America (1492) was conceived as an enterprise of the Castilian Crown, as a monopoly that the latter must defend on behalf of her subjects at any cost.
www.art.man.ac.uk /SPANISH/courses/sp2230/Vicens_ordering.html   (14046 words)

  
 Aragon - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Aragón was also the name of the crown, because of the dynastic union of a Count of Barcelona (Ramon Berenguer IV) with a Queen of Aragón (Petronila of Aragon), their son inheriting all their respective territories.
Aragon is bounded on the north by France, on the east by Catalonia, on the south by Valencia, and on the west by Castile-La Mancha, Castile-Leon, La Rioja, and Navarre.
Aragon (Spanish and Aragonese: Aragón; Catalan: Aragó) is an autonomous community of north-eastern Spain.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Aragon   (746 words)

  
 History
Fernando the 2nd (1479-1516) then took the throne and, by marrying Isabel of Castile, the Aragonese Crown (as the union of the kingdoms of Catalonia, Aragón, Valencia and Mallorca was called) became united to that of Castile, and Barcelona stopped being the seat of the monarchy.
Furthermore, the discovery of America shifted the Crown's economical interests from the Mediterranean to the Atlantic shores, grinding the Aragonese Crown and Barcelona's economy to a halt and subsequent decadence.
During the reign of the house of Austria, the monarchs lived far from Barcelona.
www.barcelona-on-line.es /eng/turisme/historia.htm   (746 words)

  
 CASTILE AND LEON TILL T... - Online Information article about CASTILE AND LEON TILL T...
Berengaria resigned the crown of Castile to her son Fernando by the uncanonical marriage with Alphonso IX.
crown of Castile passed to his See also:
king of Castile and Leon from I230 to 1252.
encyclopedia.jrank.org /CAR_CAU/CASTILE_AND_LEON_TILL_THE_UNION.html   (1705 words)

  
 Aragón (menú principal)
With the marriage of Ferdinand II of Aragon and Isabelle I of Castile, the Catholic Kings, all the states of the Crown of Aragon and those of the Crown of Castile and Leon, including the thereafter discovered territories of America, were united under the government of a single dynasty.
The territory of Aragon was historically populated by Basques, Iberians and Celts, Romans, Visigoths, Arabs and Berbers.
Aragon, an autonomous region of the kingdom of Spain, has an extension of 48.000 km2 and a population of 1.200.000 inhabitants.
goya.unizar.es /InfoGoya/Aragon_en/Aragon.html   (320 words)

  
 King of Castile+Leon Saint Fernando III
In 1217 Ferdinand became King of Castile, which crown his mother renounced in his favour, and in 1230 he succeeded to the crown of Leon, though not without civil strife, since many were opposed to the union of the two kingdoms.
He was the son of Alfonso IX, King of Leon, and of Berengeria, the daughter of Alfonso III, King of Castile, and sister of Blanche, the mother of St. Louis IX.
Source: Brian Tompsett, Leo van de Pas King of Leon and Castile, member of the Third Order of St. Francis, born in 1198 near Salamanca; died at Seville, 30 May, 1252.
worldroots.com /cgi-bin/gasteldb?@I05252@   (453 words)

  
 castile old kingdom
John I and Martin (1395-1410) dying without heirs, the Conpromiso de Caspe (a commission of nine members, three from the Cortes of each province) was assembled and gave the crown of Aragon to Ferdinand of Antequera, Infante of Castile.
Alfonso VII bore the title of emperor, and extended his conquests as far as Almeria, but he, also, at his death in 1157, divided his possessions among his children, giving Leon to Ferdinand II, and Castile to Sancho, in whose short reign the Military Order of Alcntara was founded.
Castile, with the title of king, was given to Ferdinand, who had married Sancha, the sister of Bermudo, who was to have married Garca Snchez, the last independent count.
www.duerowines.com /castilla.htm   (453 words)

  
 Spain
Prince Ferdinand, heir to the crown of Aragón and Isabella, heiress of Castile, were married in 1469.
Isabela as queen in her own right reserved to herself the patronage and revenues of Castile, Ferdinand those of Aragón, all other affairs were handled by the sovereigns jointly for the whole of Spain.
This was possible only by establishing the unquestioned supremacy of the crown.
www.puertoro.com /Spain.htm   (643 words)

  
 Sample Chapter for Meyerson, M.D.: A Jewish Renaissance in Fifteenth-Century Spain.
According to this narrative, the Jews of the Christian realms of Castile and the Crown of Aragon experienced, from roughly the end of the twelfth century until the second quarter of the fourteenth, a kind of golden age, analogous to the one their ancestors had enjoyed in Muslim Spain prior to the Almohad persecutions.
In the lands of the Crown of Aragon the violence of 1391 was unexpected and more of an anomaly, whereas in Castile the violence was the end result of years of vicious anti-Jewish activity.
The attacks on Jewish communities in the kingdom of Valencia and elsewhere in the Crown of Aragon were not, in other words, the product of years of escalating Christian animus toward the Jews.
www.pupress.princeton.edu /chapters/i7736.html   (8128 words)

  
 Aragon, Catalonia, and Valencia, 1276-1479 (from Spain) --  Britannica Student Encyclopedia
In the late Middle Ages the Crown of Aragon experienced a confrontation between the monarchy and the nobility similar to that which occurred in neighbouring Castile.
By their marriage in October 1469, Ferdinand II of Aragon and Isabella of Castile initiated a confederation of the two kingdoms that became the basis for the unification of Spain.
As Roman law and its practitioners gained in influence, protests were heard in both Aragon and Catalonia, and James I confirmed the customary law of Aragon in an assembly at Ejea in 1265.
www.britannica.com /ebi/article-70367   (839 words)

  
 Philip I
In 1496 Philip was married to Joan the Mad, daughter of Ferdinand II the Catholic of Aragon and Isabella I the Catholic of Castile; Joan later inherited the crown of Castile.
Isabella died in 1504, leaving the crown of Castile to Joan.
Philip soon began to oppose his father-in-law, who was unwilling to give up his control of Castile, and in early 1506 sailed to Spain to claim his wife's inheritance.
www.wga.hu /tours/spain/philip1.html   (334 words)

  
 JOHN II., KING OF FRANCE - LoveToKnow Article on JOHN II., KING OF FRANCE
In the be ginning of his reign he had to contend with the hostility of John of Gaunt, who claimed the crown by right of his wife Constance daughter of Peter the Cruel.
JOHN I. (1358-1390), king of Castile, was the son of Henry II.
On th death of his father-in-law in 1383, John endeavoured to enforc the claims of his wife, Ferdinand's only child, to the crown o Portugal.
97.1911encyclopedia.org /J/JO/JOHN_II_KING_OF_FRANCE.htm   (1303 words)

  
 JOHN II., KING OF CASTILE - LoveToKnow Article on JOHN II., KING OF CASTILE
JOHN I. (1358-1390), king of Castile, was the son of Henry II.
In the be ginning of his reign he had to contend with the hostility of John of Gaunt, who claimed the crown by right of his wife Constance daughter of Peter the Cruel.
On th death of his father-in-law in 1383, John endeavoured to enforc the claims of his wife, Ferdinand's only child, to the crown o Portugal.
www.1911ency.org /J/JO/JOHN_II_KING_OF_CASTILE.htm   (1303 words)

  
 Jewish History
Isabella was the heiress to the crown of Castile, and Ferdinand heir to the crown of Aragon.
Don Henry IV of Castile interceded and much damage was averted.
Don Henry IV died, and with his death fell the last barrier to the full persecution of the Jews.
www.jewishhistory.org.il /1470.htm   (801 words)

  
 Sample Chapter for Ruiz, T.F.: From Heaven to Earth: The Reordering of Castilian Society, 1150-1350.
In 1179, the Treaty of Cazola between the Crown of Aragon and Castile established various spheres of influence in the south.
Alfonso VIII's most significant achievement was his ability to forge a broad international alliance of peninsular and northern rulers (the Crown of Aragon, France, and England) against the Almohad threat--an alliance that his English connection through marriage to Eleanor, Henry II and Eleanor of Aquitaine's daughter, helped consolidate.
When Alfonso VII died in 1157, his lofty pretensions to be the "emperor of all the Spains" had come to little more than verbal claims.
www.pup.princeton.edu /chapters/i7636.html   (3943 words)

  
 Sample Chapter for Ruiz, T.F.: From Heaven to Earth: The Reordering of Castilian Society, 1150-1350.
Alfonso VIII's most significant achievement was his ability to forge a broad international alliance of peninsular and northern rulers (the Crown of Aragon, France, and England) against the Almohad threat--an alliance that his English connection through marriage to Eleanor, Henry II and Eleanor of Aquitaine's daughter, helped consolidate.
In 1179, the Treaty of Cazola between the Crown of Aragon and Castile established various spheres of influence in the south.
When Alfonso VIII came of age and assumed the rule of Castile in 1170, he found a kingdom deeply divided by noble antagonism and diminished by foreign occupation.
www.pup.princeton.edu /chapters/i7636.html   (3943 words)

  
 FRANCIA
In 1349 Count Humbert II (d.1355), the "Dauphin," simply sold the territory to the grandson of Philip VI, the prince who would later become Charles V. Thus, Charles became the first "Dauphin" of France, and as he was the Crown Prince from 1350-1364, this now became the traditional title of the Heir Apparent of France.
The Anjevian line ruling Naples had died out in 1435, and while Queen Joanna II willed the country to Duke René the Good of Anjou and Lorraine, by 1442 it was in the hands of Alfonso V of Aragón.
As the possessions of the House of Anjou fell to the French Throne in 1481, Charles decided to go after Naples, which had been left by Alfonso to his illegitimate son Ferdinand.
www.friesian.com /francia.htm   (3943 words)

  
 History of the Reign of Ferdinand and Isabella V1
Another circumstance, which contributed to impoverish the exchequer, was the occasional political revolutions in Castile, in which the adhesion of a faction was to be purchased only by the most ample concessions of the crown.—Such was the violent revolution, which placed the House of Trastamara on the throne, in the middle of the fourteenth century.
Henry, content with having so cheaply gained his point, allowed himself to soften at their entreaties, taking care, however, to detain their persons as security for their engagements, until such time as the rents, royal fortresses, and whatever effects had been filched from the crown, were restored.
Aragon did homage to Castile for her territory on the western bank of the Ebro, until the twelfth century, as did Navarre, Portugal, and, at a later period, the Moorish kingdom of Granada.
www.blackmask.com /books110c/7rfione.htm   (17585 words)

  
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: St. Ferdinand III
In 1217 Ferdinand became King of Castile, which crown his mother renounced in his favour, and in 1230 he succeeded to the crown of Leon, though not without civil strife, since many were opposed to the union of the two kingdoms.
King of Leon and Castile, member of the Third Order of St. Francis, born in 1198 near Salamanca; died at Seville, 30 May, 1252.
The highest aims of Ferdinand's life were the propagation of the Faith and the liberation of Spain from the Saracen yoke.
www.newadvent.org /cathen/06042a.htm   (17585 words)

  
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: St. Ferdinand III
In 1217 Ferdinand became King of Castile, which crown his mother renounced in his favour, and in 1230 he succeeded to the crown of Leon, though not without civil strife, since many were opposed to the union of the two kingdoms.
He was the son of Alfonso IX, King of Leon, and of Berengeria, the daughter of Alfonso III, King of Castile, and sister of Blanche, the mother of St. Louis IX.
King of Leon and Castile, member of the Third Order of St. Francis, born in 1198 near Salamanca; died at Seville, 30 May, 1252.
www.newadvent.org /cathen/06042a.htm   (17585 words)

  
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: St. Ferdinand III
In 1217 Ferdinand became King of Castile, which crown his mother renounced in his favour, and in 1230 he succeeded to the crown of Leon, though not without civil strife, since many were opposed to the union of the two kingdoms.
He was the son of Alfonso IX, King of Leon, and of Berengeria, the daughter of Alfonso III, King of Castile, and sister of Blanche, the mother of St. Louis IX.
King of Leon and Castile, member of the Third Order of St. Francis, born in 1198 near Salamanca; died at Seville, 30 May, 1252.
www.newadvent.org /cathen/06042a.htm   (452 words)

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