Factbites
 Where results make sense
About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   PR   |   Contact us  

Topic: Croyland Chronicle


Related Topics

In the News (Sun 18 Aug 19)

  
  Croyland Chronicle
The Croyland Chronicle (or "Crowland Chronicle") is an important, if not always reliable, primary source for English medieval history, in particular the late 15th century.
It was written at the Benedictine Abbey of Croyland, in Lincolnshire, England, off and on from 655 to 1486, and its first author was "Ingulph" or "Ingulf" of Croyland.
The part that covers the years 1459-1486 was written in April 1486 (after Henry Tudor had become Henry VII of England) by someone who had been an insider at the court of Richard III -- someone described in it as being a doctor of canon law and member of Edward IV's council.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/cr/Croyland_Chronicle.html   (240 words)

  
  Read about Chronicle at WorldVillage Encyclopedia. Research Chronicle and learn about Chronicle here!   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
A dead chronicle is one where the author gathers his list of events up to the time of his writing, but does not record further events as they occur.
A live chronicle is where one or more authors add to a chronicle in a regular fashion, recording contemporary events shortly after they occur.
Middle Ages describing historical events in a country, or the lives of a nobleman or a clergyman, although it is also applied to a record of public events.
encyclopedia.worldvillage.com /s/b/Chronicle   (214 words)

  
 Richard III Society--Croyland Chronicle
From that period, the Chronicle continues, with occasional slight interruptions, to 1254; after which there is an hiatus to the date of the fragment probably around 1280.
From 1281, there is another hiatus, to 1327, which comprises, as we learn from other sources (2), the resignation of Abbat Richard, in 1303, the accession of Simon de Luffenham, his cession in 1322 (3), and the accession of Abbat Henry de Caswyk.
It seems to have been the same which is mentioned by Gough, in his history of Croyland, as being in 1734 the property of Robert Hunter, lord of the manor of Croyland.
www.r3.org /bookcase/croyland/croy1.html   (2642 words)

  
 Crowland
Croyland or (modern usage) Crowland is a village in Lincolnshire, England, with two major points of historic interest.
One is the unique three-sided bridge which stands at its central point; the other is its ruined medieval abbey, Crowland Abbey.
The Croyland Chronicle, a major source for medieval historians, is believed to be the work of one of the monastery's inhabitants.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/cr/Croyland.html   (60 words)

  
 The Richard III and Yorkist History Server
Scholars planning to make extensive use of this work are encouraged to consult the newer edition, The Crowland Chronicle Continuations, 1459-1486, edited by Nicholas Pronay and John Cox, printed for The Richard III and Yorkist History Trust by Alan Sutton Publishing, 1986.
Part II: Succession of Abbats at Croyland; from the final portion of The Second Continuation of the History of Croyland Abbey: 1453-1462 with Notes.
Part XI: Conclusion of the Fourth Continuation of the History of Croyland Abbey.
www.r3.org /bookcase/croyland   (314 words)

  
 Croyland Abbey Information
Croyland Abbey (occasionally spelled Crowland Abbey) is a parish church, formerly an abbey church in Crowland in the English county of Lincolnshire.
Croyland is well known to historians as the probable home of the Croyland Chronicle, begun by one of its monks and continued by several other hands.
In 1537, the abbot of Croyland wrote to Thomas Cromwell, sending him a gift of fish: "ryght mekely besechyng yow lordship favorablye to accepte the same fyshe, and to be gud and favorable lorde unto me and my pore house".
www.bookrags.com /wiki/Croyland_Abbey   (303 words)

  
 Croyland Chronicle -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Croyland Chronicle -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article
Over the years, there has been confusion between the "second" and "third" continuators, and the "fourth" continuator claims not to know the identity of the third.
This date ties in with the survival of a copy of (Click link for more info and facts about Titulus Regius) Titulus Regius in the text, and Russell is known to have been at (Click link for more info and facts about Crowland) Crowland during April, 1486.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/c/cr/croyland_chronicle.htm   (81 words)

  
 CHRONICLE FACTS AND INFORMATION   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
This is in contrast to a narrative or history, which focuses on important events and excludes those the author does not see as important.
The term often refers to a book written by a chronicler in the Middle_Ages describing historical events in a country, or the lives of a nobleman or a clergyman, although it is also applied to a record of public events.
Various contemporary newspapers or other periodicals have adopted "chronicle" as part of their name.
www.askacouple.com /chronicle   (210 words)

  
 Crowland - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Croyland or (modern usage) Crowland is a village in Lincolnshire, England, with two major points of historical interest.
One is the unique three-sided bridge which stands at its central point; the other is its ruined medieval abbey, Crowland Abbey.
The Croyland Chronicle, a major source for medieval historians, is believed to be the work of one of the monastery's inhabitants.
www.encyclopedia-online.info /Crowland   (86 words)

  
 Chronicle Information
A dead chronicle is one where the author gathers his list of events up to the time of his writing, but does not record further events as they occur.
A live chronicle is where one or more authors add to a chronicle in a regular fashion, recording contemporary events shortly after they occur.
The term often refers to a book written by a chronicler in the Middle Ages describing historical events in a country, or the lives of a nobleman or a clergyman, although it is also applied to a record of public events.
www.bookrags.com /wiki/Chronicle   (248 words)

  
 Primary Chronicle
The Primary Chronicle (Russian: Повесть временных лет, Povest' vremennykh let, which is often translated into English as Tale of Bygone Years), is a history of the Ancient Rus from around 850 to 1110 originally compiled in Kiev about 1113.
The original of the chronicle is lost, and the earliest known copies are the Laurentian codex and the Hypatian codex, so it is difficult to establish the original content of the chronicle, word by word.
A collation of the chronicle by Donald Ostrowski in Cyrillic is available at http://hudce7.harvard.edu/~ostrowski/pvl/ together with an erudite and lengthy introduction in English.
www.wordsinabox.com /argomenti_generali/chronicle/primary_chroniscle.asp   (985 words)

  
 Crowland - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Crowland (modern usage) or Croyland (medieval era name) is a town in Lincolnshire, England, positioned between Peterborough and Spalding, with two major sites of historical interest.
One is the unique fourteenth Century three-sided bridge, Trinity Bridge, which stands at its central point, the confluence of three rivers, the other is its ruined medieval Crowland Abbey, founded by St Guthlac in the eighth century.
The Croyland Chronicle, an important source for medieval historians, is believed to be the work of one of the monastery's inhabitants.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Crowland   (110 words)

  
 Histories, Chronicles and Annals
The monasteries still produced their chronicles, but the authors were much more connected to the affairs of the world.
Froissart's chronicles were produced in fancy illuminated and decorated editions for lay readers, like the lavish volumes of romance which evolved and developed at about the same time.
It is as unreasonable to expect a medieval historian or chronicler to have produced a totally unbiased account as it would be to expect a soldier in the trenches to produce an analytical and dispassionate account of the First World War.
medievalwriting.50megs.com /word/chronicle4.htm   (1427 words)

  
 Mahavansha
The Mahavansha, also Mahawansha, (Pāli: "great chronicle") is a historical record written in the Pāli language, of the Buddhist kings as well as Dravidian kings of Sri Lanka.
The Mahavansha was written in the 6th century CE by the Buddhist monk Mahanama, brother of the Sri-Lankan King Dhatusena, and heavily relied on the Dipavamsa, written five centuries earlier.
A companion volume, the Culavamsa or Choolavansha ("lesser chronicle"), compiled by Sinhala Buddhist monks, covers the period from the 4th century to the British takeover of Sri Lanka in 1815 and it is often disputed as a semi-fiction by scholars.
www.wordsinabox.com /argomenti_generali/chronicle/mahavansha.asp   (747 words)

  
 Chronicle - Japan   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
A dead chronicle is one where the author gathers his list of events up to the time of his writing, but does not record further events as they occur.
The term often refers to a book written by a chronicler in the Middle Ages describing historical events in a country, or the lives of a nobleman or a clergyman, although it is also applied to a record of public events.
Various fictional stories have also adopted "chronicle" as part of their title, to give an impression of epic proportion to their stories.
chronicle.zdnet.co.za /zdnet/Chronicle   (790 words)

  
 Old England - Old And New
In his chronicle we have also the story of the death of William Rufus in New Forest, and an unqualified testimony is given to its being un-witting" on the part of Walter Tirel.
The violent controversy between Henry de Longchamp, abbot of Croyland, and Simon, prior of Spalding, regarding the "common of pasture in the marshes of Croyland, Spalding, Pinchbeck, Langtoft, Baston, and Deyping," which lie about the western side of the river Welland, is feelingly narrated, showing there could be anger in heavenly minds.
Croyland Abbey is at present but a solitary fragment, whose tottering walls need propping or they will soon tumble down, which would be a great pity.
www.oldandsold.com /articles36/old-england-26.shtml   (2420 words)

  
 Was Weir Right   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Vergil, and another chronicler, Fabyan, both agree that "the most common fame" was that Henry VI was "struck with a dagger by the hands of the Duke of Gloucester" or that "the Duke of Gloucester was not altogether guiltless."
Croyland reports, "However, a great cause of anxiety, which was growing, was the detention in prison of the king's relatives and servants."
The Croyland Chronicle says, "On the previous day, with remarkable shrewdness, the Protector had divided the Council so that, in the morning, part met at Westminster, part in the Tower, where the King was.
home.cogeco.ca /~richardiii/weir.html   (2343 words)

  
 Medieval Sourcebook: England
Roger of Hoveden: The Revolt of 1173-74, from The Chronicle
Roger of Hoveden: The Chronicle: On the Disputes between Thomas Becket, Archbishop of Canterbury and King Henry II of England, early 13th c.
Chronicle of the Abbey of St. Edmunds (1173-1202), (c.1156-d.1202(?)).
www.fordham.edu /halsall/sbook1n.html   (1986 words)

  
 Richard III and his nephews
The Continuation of the Croyland Chronicle, about which more a bit later, says that it was only after Hastings threatened to withdraw from the Council to Calais that the level of Rivers' recruitment of a "retinue" for the young king was kept to reasonable limits.
The contemporary chronicles, particularly Mancini, concentrating on the initiatives which Gloucester took, tend to jump from the seizing of Edward V to the execution of Hastings six weeks later, without noting in detail the protectorate which operated in that period.
The chronicle proper was a summary, like many others, of the history of England and the history of the monastery whence it came.
www.users.on.net /~jackr/history/richard.html   (3294 words)

  
 Abbey of Croyland
In 1170 the greater part of the abbey and church was once more burnt down and once more rebuilt, under Abbot Edward.
From this time the history of Croyland was one of growing and almost unbroken prosperity down to the time of the Dissolution.
Richly endowed by royal and noble visitors to the shrine of St. Guthlac, it became one of the most opulent of East Anglian abbeys; and owning to its isolated position in the heart of the fen country, its security and peace were comparatively undisturbed during the great civil wars and other national troubles.
www.catholicity.com /encyclopedia/c/croyland,abbey_of.html   (328 words)

  
 The Abbey—Early History and Folklore   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
The story of Croyland Abbey is told in the "Croyland Chronicle", which purports to have been written by the historian-abbot, Ingulphus (1076-1109), and continued by other writers.
Many medieval monasteries claimed a greater antiquity and continuity than can be proven today, but we should not simply dismiss the Chronicle as a spurious forgery; it is a valuable part of the corporate memory and tradition of the community which lived and worked and worshipped here.
The Chronicle gives details of the lands and possessions granted to the monks, and a description of some aspects of their communal life, and of the buildings in which they lived.
www.croylandabbey.co.uk /page4.html   (597 words)

  
 A Murderer?
However, the Croyland Chronicle hints that Lancaster may have been murdered after the battle.
The Croyland Chronicle states that "the common fame went that the Duke of Gloucester was not altogether guiltless." This may mean that Gloucester made arrangements on Edward's orders, which is believable.
Their joint grief over the loss of their only child, Edward, in 1484, was reported in the Croyland Chronicle and Richard apparently wept openly at her funeral.
www.fifteenthcentury.net /murderer.html   (716 words)

  
 ingulf   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Ingulph or Ingulf died 16 November 1109 as a Benedictine abbot of Croyland Abbey at Crowland, Lincolnshire.
He was appointed abbot there in 1080.As his life as Abbot of Croyland progressed, Ingulph suffered the usual events: gout and the work of rebuilding after a destructive fire in the abbey.
These relics brought in the pilgrims and eased his money problems.For several centuries, he was credited with the original authorship of a history of Croyland Abbey, Historia Monasterii Croylandensis, the Croyland Chronicle, a manuscript which has since been shown to have been fabricated well after his time, probably in the 13th or 14th century.
webraindor.info /wiki/ingulf   (380 words)

  
 Crowland Abbey   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Part of the abbey church is still in use.
Crowland is well known to historians as the probable home of the Croyland Chronicle, begun by one of its monks and continued by several other hands.
In 1537, the abbot of Crowland wrote to Thomas Cromwell, sending him a gift of fish: "ryght mekely besechyng yow lordship favorablye to accepte the same fyshe, and to be gud and favorable lorde unto me and my pore house".
www.uncover.us /en/wikipedia/c/cr/crowland_abbey.html   (132 words)

  
 thePeerage.com - Exhibit
The chronicler was informed by members of the royal council that Gloucester was urging the king to coerce the Aquitanians into receiving his elder brother, to leave the field clear for himself at home.
Croyland Abbey and the Dominican friary at King's Langley assigned him the honours of a founder.
Its narrative was embodied in the official Latin Chronicle of the Monk of St. Denys (ed.
www.thepeerage.com /e35.htm   (9706 words)

  
 Richard III Society: MYTH VS FACT   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Chroniclers writing under the early Tudors mention an unevenness to Richard's shoulders, but since they cannot agree upon which was the higher, this may not have been very pronounced.
It is in the Chronicles of Raphael Holinshed, first published in 1577, that Richard of Gloucester alone is accused of the murder of Edward.
Holinshed's Chronicles was the standard history text of England, and Shakespeare made extensive use of it as source material for his plays.
home.cogeco.ca /~richardiii/myths.html   (2346 words)

  
 Swiss illustrated chronicles (Old Swiss Confederacy)
Several illustrated chronicles were created in the Old Swiss Confederacy in the 15th and 16th centuries.
The most important of these chronicles are the works of the two Diebold Schillings, their luxurious execution, as well as their content reflecting the growing confidence and self-esteem of the leaders of the confederacy after their spectacular successes in the Burgundy Wars.
1423 Konrad Justinger's chronicle (Berne) the original was lost, but a copy of the text survives in Jena.
www.wordsinabox.com /argomenti_generali/chronicle/swiss.asp   (431 words)

Try your search on: Qwika (all wikis)

Factbites
  About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   Press   |   Contact us  
Copyright © 2005-2007 www.factbites.com Usage implies agreement with terms.