Factbites
 Where results make sense
About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   PR   |   Contact us  

Topic: Ctesias


Related Topics

  
  Lore of the Unicorn: Chapter I. The Gorgeous East
Ctesias must have been told something, for his idea about the properties of the onager's horn were not derived from plastic or tectile representation; the suggestion is only that he may have filled in his description with details of an artistic origin.
Ctesias could scarcely have spent seventeen years in Persia without knowing rather definitely what he meant when he referred to the wild ass, and it seems probable that this animal contributed something to his description of the unicorn.
Ctesias gives us the impression that this bone was important by saying in the first place, quite wrongly, that among solid-hoofed animals only the wild ass has it, and secondly that the unicorned onager is hunted in India for the horn and the ankle-bone only.
www.sacred-texts.com /etc/lou/lou03.htm   (5328 words)

  
 Ctesias of Cnidus
All sources agree that Ctesias was born in the Carian town Cnidus, a town in the extreme southwest of modern Turkey.
Ctesias was a respected physician, but it is uncertain whether he served at Persepolis immediately after his capture.
Because Ctesias spent seventeen years in Persia, was court physician and served as diplomat, we might expect him to be a position to keep his promises and to write a truly reliable history of the Achaemenid empire.
www.livius.org /ct-cz/ctesias/ctesias.htm   (2409 words)

  
 Smerdis of Persia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Smerdis was the younger son of Cyrus the Great who, according to Ctesias, on his deathbed appointed him governor of the eastern provinces (cf.
According to both Herodotus and his successor Darius (in the Behistun Inscription), Cambyses II, before he set out to Egypt, secretly caused his brother to be murdered, being afraid that he might attempt a rebellion during his absence.
The history of the false Smerdis is narrated by Herodotus and Ctesias according to official traditions; Cambyses before his death confessed to the murder of his brother, and in public explained the whole fraud.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Smerdis_of_Persia   (598 words)

  
 Wikipedia: Ctesias
Ctesias, of Cnidus in Caria, was a Greek physician and historian, who flourished in the 5th century BC.
The first six books treated of the history of Assyria and Babylon to the foundation of the Persian empire; the remaining seventeen went down to the year 398 BC.
Of the two histories we possess abridgments by Photius, and fragments are preserved in Athenaeus, Plutarch and especially Diodorus Siculus, whose second book is mainly from Ctesias.
www.factbook.org /wikipedia/en/c/ct/ctesias.html   (165 words)

  
 Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology, page 898 (v. 1)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Ctesias himself had simply stated, that he asked Artaxerxes and obtained from him the permission to return.
When the letter was given for this purpose to Ctesias, the latter inserted a passage in which he made Conon desire the king to send Ctesias to the west, as he would be a very useful person there.
The chronicles used by Ctesias were written by official persons, and those used by Berosus were the work of priests ; both therefore were written from a different point of view, and neither was per­haps strictly true in all its details.
www.ancientlibrary.com /smith-bio/0907.html   (1062 words)

  
 JewishEncyclopedia.com - CYRUS   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
B.C. by Ctesias, who states that Cyrus was not related to Astyages, but that, after dethroning him, he married Astyages' daughter Amytis.
In Ctesias, however, the traditions are extravagant and distorted.
Ctesias' dates for this period are, however, unreliable.
www.jewishencyclopedia.com /view.jsp?artid=951&letter=C   (2114 words)

  
 The Internet Classics Archive | Artaxerxes by Plutarch
But the account of Ctesias, to put it shortly, omitting many details, is as follows: Cyrus, after the death of Artagerses, rode up against the king, as he did against him, neither exchanging a word with the other.
But Ctesias, as is evident, being excessively vainglorious and no less a favourer of the Lacedaemonians and Clearchus, never fails to assume to himself some province in his narrative, taking opportunity, in these situations, to introduce abundant high praise of Clearchus and Sparta.
Ctesias allows her only to have been conscious of it, and that against her will; charging Belitaras with actually giving the drug, whereas Dinon says it was Melantas.
classics.mit.edu /Plutarch/artaxerx.html   (6163 words)

  
 CTESIAS - LoveToKnow Article on CTESIAS   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The first six books treated of the history of Assyria and Babylon to the foundation of the Persian empire; the remaining seventeen went down to the year 398.
Being based upon Persian authorities, it was naturally looked upon with suspicion by the Greeks and censured as untrustworthy.
For an estimate of Ctesias as a historian see G. Rawlinsons Herodotus, i.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /C/CT/CTESIAS.htm   (179 words)

  
 Discovering Unicorns
Ctesias also tells about the magic of the horn, saying if you drink from a beaker made from the horn you are not subject to convulsions of the Holy Disorder (Epilepsy) and are immune to poisons after drinking from the beaker.
Pliny differs from Ctesias in that his Unicorn has a stag's head, the solid hoof of the elephant, a boar's tail, and the body of a horse.
Because of the Unicorns dual ancestry, descending from the horse and the ass of India on the side of Ctesias, and the goat on the side of Physiologus, during the middle ages there was a series of hybrid variations of the Unicorn.
www.angelfire.com /ks/LadyKassandra/unicorns.html   (1962 words)

  
 Iranica.com - DARIUS
Its effects appear to be reflected in the archive of the Babylonian banking family the Muraæu@s: In the second year of the reign of Darius II Ochus there was an increase in the number of mortgages, possibly resulting from the fiscal and military demands of his first year (Stolper, pp.
Ctesias mentioned a revolt by Darius' full brother Arsites, assisted by Artyphios (qq.v.), son of the satrap Megabyzus, who had mounted a revolt during Artaxerxes' reign.
This Darius was born of Amestris (q.v.) and was thus the brother of Hystaspes, Artaxerxes I (q.v.), Amytis (q.v.), and Rhodogune (Ctesias, in Jacoby, Fragmente III.C, p.
www.iranica.com /articles/v7f1/v7f136b.html   (4234 words)

  
 Ctesias - WCD (Wiki Classical Dictionary)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The chronicles used by Ctesias were written by official persons, and those used by Berosus were the work of priests; both therefore were written from a different point of view, and neither was perhaps strictly true in all its details.
The court chronicles of Persia appear to have contained chiefly the history of the royal family, the occurrences at the court and the seraglio, the intrigues of the women and eunuchs, and the insurrections of satraps to make themselves independent of the great monarch.
Ctesias himself never visited India, and his work was the first in the Greek language that was written upon that country; he could do nothing more than lay before his countrymen that which was known or believed about India among the Persians.
www.ancientlibrary.com /wcd/Ctesias   (1609 words)

  
 Gallery Of Horror - Ctesias   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Returning to Greece in 398, Ctesias began writing his Persicha, a history of Assyria-Babylonia in 23 books covering the period of the ancient Assyrian monarchy, the founding of the Persian kingdom, and the history of Persia down to 398 BC.
Although his material was gathered from Persian archives and state records, its credibility is dubious because of its legendary quality and the fact that Ctesias was writing expressly to contradict the chronology of the Greek historian Herodotus.
Ctesias also wrote a history of India based on reports of Persian visitors and of Indian merchants and envoys to the Persian court.
www.angelfire.com /tx5/galleryofhorror/ctesias.html   (221 words)

  
 Ancient Mesopotamia in European Thought
Ctesias, a Greek doctor at the Persian court at the end of the fifth and the beginning of the fourth century, produced an enormous work on Persian history in twenty-three books, in which he discredited a great many of Herodotus's findings on eastern history.
According to Ctesias, the Assyrian Empire, to which he devoted three books, was a model the Persians sought to follow.
Herodotus acquired a reputation as a liar quite early on, while Ctesias, with his vaunted use of Persian sources, was thought to be the more reliable historian.
www.granta.demon.co.uk /arsm/jg/persica.html   (4698 words)

  
 Plutarch's Life of Artaxerxes
[11] But the account of Ctesias, to put it shortly, omitting many details, is as follows: Cyrus, after the death of Artagerses, rode up against the king, as he did against him, neither exchanging a word with the other.
But Ctesias, as is evident, being excessively vain-glorious, and no less a favorer of the Lacedaemonians and Clearchus, never fails to assume to himself some province in his narrative, taking opportunity, in these situations, to introduce abundant high praise of Clearchus and Sparta.
Ctesias, however, declares that the king, of his own accord, deputed him to this service.
www.bostonleadershipbuilders.com /plutarch/artaxerxes.htm   (6564 words)

  
 Megabyzus (2)
Ctesias tells that in the Summer of 479, Xerxes ordered Megabyzus to pillage the sanctuary of Apollo at Delphi.
Ctesias continues his history with an account of Megabyzus' personal war against Artaxerxes, in which his sons Zopyrus and Artyphius were also engaged.
On Ctesias' chronology, he returned to the Persian court in c.444 BCE and died not much later at the age of seventy-six.
www.livius.org /mea-mem/megabyzus/megabyzus02.html   (1161 words)

  
 Unicorns in India   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Ctesias (Tee-See-us) was a Greek doctor who was appointed to the court of Darius II, King of Persia in 416bce.
In the last part of the Indica, Ctesias asserts that his book is “perfectly true, that he has set down nothing which he has not either seen himself or else heard from the mouths of credible witnesses.
He even goes so far as to say the catazon has a horn between its brow and that it would be ridiculous to describe the rhinoceros since it is so familiar to all Greeks and Romans.
www.whiterosesgarden.com /Unicorns/UNI_world_myths/UNI_india.htm   (1130 words)

  
 Ctesias --  Encyclopædia Britannica
Ctesias traveled to the Persian court, where he remained as physician for 17 years under the rulers Darius II and Artaxerxes Mnemon.
The unicorn appeared in early Mesopotamian artworks, and it also was referred to in the ancient myths of India and China.
The earliest description in Greek literature of a single-horned (Greek: monokero Latin: unicornis) animal was by the historian Ctesias (c.
www.britannica.com /eb/article-9028097   (418 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
R. asserts, "Ctesias seems not to have looked down on the Dog-heads as mentally or culturally deficient creatures...just after being compared to dogs, the Dog-heads are also described as "just" (dikaioi)--an adjective which in Greek ethnography connotes a state of supreme moral perfection.
Far from confirming the supremacy of man over the "sub"-human Ctesias seems instead to have used the Dog-heads to call that supremacy into question." An intriguing argument--if the reader has never looked at the Indika epitome.
Ctesias, his informants and his audience lacked the breadth of organized experience which would allow them to distinguish the merely strange and unfamiliar (the parrot) from the fanciful and plainly fictitious (the **DI/KH**-bird).
www.infomotions.com /serials/bmcr/bmcr-v3n05-brennan-edges.txt   (1724 words)

  
 The Legend of the Unicorn   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Another school of thought, led by a German, Professor Schrader, cited Ctesias as evidence that the origin of the unicorn legend is the re'em.
Its size, strength, and fierceness made it particularly suited for attracting myths which a short time, when Ctesias the Greek came to Persia, in all probability there was a sufficient supply of fables on hand to be related to traveling foreigners.
From the days of Ctesias the horn of the unicorn-called "alicorn" to avoid the cacophonous term "unicorn horn"-had been taken to be an antidote against any kind of poison and assassin might concoct.
home.comcast.net /~jillmeadows1/The_Legend_of_the_Unicorn.html   (5024 words)

  
 Ctesias of Cnidus Cnidus in Caria Caria was a Greek...
Ctesias of Cnidus Cnidus in Caria Caria was a Greek...
"Ctesias", of Cnidus Cnidus in Caria Caria, was a Greek Greek physician physician and historian historian, who flourished in the 5th century BC 5th century BC.
The first six books treated of the history of Assyria and Babylon Babylon to the foundation of the Persian empire; the remaining seventeen went down to the year 398 BC.
www.biodatabase.de /Ctesias   (220 words)

  
 Herodotus: pontikon nuts and coffee
Besides Ctesias and Nicandrus, only the physician Galen mentions it--VI.335 in passing: "a boil, sometimes as large as a pontikon nut, sometimes twice or thrice that size." The phrasing suggests that other physicians would know the size of a pontikon nut.
Now, Herodotus and Ctesias use the name for something unknown to the Greeks; hence pontic nut cannot mean 'nut from the Pontus area' ie the Black Sea.
Anyway, Ctesias is probably writing 'pontikon' for New Persian *puntaka, without relation to the Greek pontos; *puntaka or *puntika is a normal Old Persian adjective of origin and means 'from Punt, Puntic.' And the south Persian pronunciation of *puntaka would be *punnah.
www.iras.ucalgary.ca /~volk/sylvia/Coffee.htm   (1013 words)

  
 1   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
This seal was found between 1927 and 1931 at Mohenjo-daro, Pakistan,.dated 2000 B.C.E. and believed to be a unicorn (with obvious rhinoceros influence).
The first documented reference to the unicorn was from a man named Ctesias, a Greek physician at the Persian court in the year 400 B.C.E. His book, entitled Persica, was about the natural history of Assyria and Babylonia.
Ctesias writes of seeing a savage wild ass with a horse’s body, a goat’s head, and a single spiral horn in the center of its head.
www.wpunj.edu /cohss/history/archive/jz/antiquity/antiquity.htm   (504 words)

  
 baby11   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The following text is a description of the city of Babylon as recorded by Ctesias, a court physician to Artaxerxes II, concerning Queen Semiramis.
This machinery was entirely enclosed, and so could not be seen from the outside.
Ctesias also gives largess dimensions for the city wall but appears inconsistent.
claymore.engineer.gvsu.edu /~sietsemr/gpy235/baby11.html   (521 words)

  
 Artaxerxes - Plutarch's Lives - translated by John Dryden and revised by Arthur Hugh Clough, Book, etext
But Ctesias, as is evident, being excessively vain-glorious, and no less a favorer of the Lacedæmonians and Clearchus, never fails to assume to himself some province in his narrative, taking opportunity, in these situations, to introduce abundant high praise of Clearchus and Sparta.
He conferred likewise high honors upon Ctesias and others, and, having found out the Caunian who gave him the bottle of water, he made him,—a poor, obscure man—, a rich and an honorable person.
For Conon, after the battle of Ægospotami, resided in Cyprus; not that he consulted his own mere security, but looking for a vicissitude of affairs with no less hope than men wait for a change of wind at sea.
whitewolf.newcastle.edu.au /words/authors/P/Plutarch/prose/plutachslives/artaxerxes.html   (6170 words)

  
 Compendium of World History - Vol. 1
Ctesias and Herodotus preserve accurately the chronological history of the early Median tribes and of two distinct revolts.
Here are the Median kings according to Ctesias' record from the Persian archives.
The chronological evidence from Ctesias and Herodotus indicates the last three kings of each Median line shared the throne jointly.
cgca.net /coglinks/wcglit/hoehcompendium/hhc1ch15.htm   (3576 words)

  
 Religious Symbolism And The Unicorn
In this work, Ctesias describes the wonders of India as told to him by numerous travelers who told tales of their journeys to northern India where valuable dyes and woven fabrics were obtained through trade.
Later writings, including the biology texts of Aristotle who catalogued all known animals via genus and species, referenced the work of Ctesias as though it were an accurate first-hand account of creatures from the East.
Apparently, two separate traditions of the unicorn merge in the Middle Ages: the naturalist perspective of Ctesias and the moral tales attributed to Physiologus.
www.wickedwinks.com /uni/ul.html   (2464 words)

Try your search on: Qwika (all wikis)

Factbites
  About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   Press   |   Contact us  
Copyright © 2005-2007 www.factbites.com Usage implies agreement with terms.