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Topic: Cumulonimbus with mammatus


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In the News (Tue 23 Apr 19)

  
  Clouds
Cumulonimbus calvus represents a transitional stage between cumulus congestus and a fully fledged cumulonimbus incus.
A cumulonimbus incus formation must always be regarded as a significant aviation hazard because of the powerful air currents involved in its formation and the potentially damaging effect of the large hailstones it may produce.
Mammatus may be observed wherever cumulonimbus clouds occur, but it is particularly common in areas where thunderstorms are severe, such as tropical and subtropical areas.
www.theairlinepilots.com /met/clouds.htm   (6588 words)

  
 Mammatus Clouds - Crystalinks   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-09)
Mammatus (also known as mamma or mammatocumulus, meaning "breast-cloud") is a meteorological term applied to a cellular pattern of pouches hanging underneath the base of a cloud, often a cumulus or cumulonimbus.
Mammatus only occur where cumulonimbus are present; however, they can drift up to 25 miles away from a thunderstorm.
It is very common for storms producing mammatus clouds also to produce wind shear, and possibly - though less likely - ball lightning; therefore, aviators are strongly cautioned to avoid cumulonimbus with mammatus.
www.crystalinks.com /mammatusclouds.html   (261 words)

  
 USATODAY.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-09)
While mammatus clouds usually form beneath weakening thunderstorms, the kinds of thunderstorms that have them at one time contained intense updrafts, which indicates conditions in the area were, and might still be, favorable for severe weather.
Mammatus are pouch-like clouds that protrude down from the bottom of a thunderstorm's anvil cloud.
However, mammatus clouds sometimes form on the upwind, or backside, of severe thunderstorms that at the same time are dropping large hail and unleashing 60-70 mph bursts of wind.
www.usatoday.com /weather/tg/wmamatus/wmamatus.htm   (257 words)

  
 Mammatus cloud - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Cumulonimbus with mammatus formed after Cyclone Catarina in Santa Catarina, Brazil, 2004
Contrary to common misconceptions, mammatus are not precursors to tornadoes, but are a possible byproduct [1].
It is very common for storms producing mammatus clouds also to produce wind shear, and possibly—though less likely—Ball lightning; therefore, aviators are strongly cautioned to avoid cumulonimbus with mammatus.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Mammatus_cloud   (335 words)

  
 Clouds-intro
The updrafts in these clouds range from brief puffs of a few meters per second (5-10 mph) in small Cumulus and Cumulonimbus clouds (see 5A, 5B, 6A, and 6C) to sustained updrafts of 30 m/s (65 mph) or more in the most powerful thunderstorms (see 6B, 6D and 6E).
Cumulonimbus clouds are the Tyrannosaurus rexes of the cloud world.
The smallest Cumulonimbus clouds form in polar air (see 6A and 6C) and can be less than 2 km thick.
www.ias.sdsmt.edu /dept/clouds-intro.htm   (1609 words)

  
 Clouds   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-09)
Cumulonimbus clouds are associated with heavy rain, snow, hail, lightning and even tornadoes.
Mammatus clouds are low hanging bulges that droop from cumulonimbus clouds.
Mammatus clouds are usually associated with severe weather.
www.weatherwizkids.com /cloud.htm   (1084 words)

  
 Cumulonimbus Pics
Mammatus are often an indicator of severe turbulence, and are also commonly associated with severe weather.
A fascinating view of a wall cloud that I saw during a trip hope to Minnesota in July, 2000.
The first of a series of three photographs showing a dissipating cumulonimbus east of NAS Meridian near sunset.
www.ajfroggie.com /wxpics/cb   (356 words)

  
 Cumulonimbus Pictures
Cumulonimbus mammatus on edge of storm in above photos.
Cumulonimbus in rural Lincoln County Nebraska, photographed in the late afternoon.
Cumulonimbus mammatus over North Platte, photographed in the evening.
www.crh.noaa.gov /lbf/?n=cbphotos   (181 words)

  
 SDS Weatherwise Extras: Cloud Photos
This is the view of the bottom portion of a cumulonimbus cloud when it is about to rain.
Because of its massive size and towering height, this is often the only view of a cumulonimbus that can be seen at close range.
These often appear on the underside of a cumulonimbus and indicate the possibility of severe weather.
www.discoverscience.rutgers.edu /extras/weatherwise/clouds.html   (438 words)

  
 Cumulonimbus mammatus is my favorite kind of cloud (kottke.org)
Cumulonimbus mammatus is my favorite kind of cloud (kottke.org)
Cumulonimbus mammatus is my favorite kind of cloud.
Yes mammatus clouds are really spooky, I photographed one last year right at sunset.
www.kottke.org /remainder/04/01/4953.html   (119 words)

  
 Cloud Identification Page   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-09)
CUMULONIMBUS: (genus) A massive low level cloud, with or without an "anvil" top, reaching great heights (60,000ft in the tropics!).
Lightning, tornadoes, hail, and high winds are often associated with this destructive cloud.
Mammatus below a cumulonimbus cloud is often associated with severe weather.
www.wxgeek.com /clouds   (699 words)

  
 Jeff's Weather Photos   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-09)
Cumulonimbus mammatus clouds over Turlock, CA Feb 27, 1997
The western cell, photographed here, weakened, but produced this display of cumulonimbus mammatus.
The eastern cell maintained its strength, and was producing cloud-to-ground lightning as this photo was taken.
home.earthlink.net /~jwear/cbmam.htm   (89 words)

  
 AIRMAP | Weather Toolbox | Cloud Classification
Cumulonimbus (CB), where the upper part of at least one of the CB clouds in clearly fibrous or striated.
By convention, code figure 9 is used for Cumulonimbus Mammatus (CBMAM) and those cases in which lightning, thunder, or hail indicates the presence of a CB but the top is hidden by darkness or other clouds.
Dense cirrus (CI) (often in the form of an anvil) originating from cumulonimbus (CB).
www.ccrc.sr.unh.edu /~stm/AS/Weather_Toolbox/Cloud_Classification.html   (525 words)

  
 AOSS202 - Main Page   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-09)
OK, they may be man-made but they still classify as cirrus.
Mammatus, located on the anvil of a cumulonimbus (but only mammatus gets you points).
This is a dust storm moving across Australia, sometimes produced as a gust front from a nearby storm, other times it provides a stunning visualization of a cold front.
aoss.engin.umich.edu /class/aoss202/exams/answers.html   (166 words)

  
 Jeff's Weather Photos   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-09)
Cumulonimbus mammatus in Whiteface TX May 26, 1998
These mammatus clouds developed underneath an anvil of a high-precipitation supercell which produced several funnel clouds near Milnesand NM.
I did see what looked like a ragged wall cloud in this storm near the TX/NM border, but rain masked much of this storm's features.
home.earthlink.net /~jwear/cbmamtx.htm   (52 words)

  
 Fall Colors   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-09)
Mark Emond, Livermore 101/2WSW has captured a set of images of Cumulonimbus Mammatus.
These often form on the base or sides of thunderstorm cells.
Report it followed by the direction from the station and which way it is moving.
www.msws.net /picts/mammatus   (62 words)

  
 Cumulonimbus Mammatus, Mamma Clouds - Acclaim Stock Photography
Cumulonimbus Mammatus, Mamma Clouds - Acclaim Stock Photography
Stock Photo Description: Cumulonimbus mamma clouds are low to middle clouds that may follow severe weather.
These clouds do not form tornadoes as often thought.
www.acclaimimages.com /_gallery/_pages/0025-0506-1320-1846.html   (172 words)

  
 clouds on Flickr - Photo Sharing!
Cumulonimbus Mammatus clouds, you don't get to see clouds like these very often, I'm glad I had my camera.
Not where I was, however the storm did produce many tornados and torrential rains.
That is an awesome picture, the lighting on the mammatus are awesome!
www.flickr.com /photos/99446938@N00/35234831   (118 words)

  
 North Dakota Weather: Cumulonimbus Mammatus near Jamestown, North Dakota   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-09)
North Dakota Weather: Cumulonimbus Mammatus near Jamestown, North Dakota
Spectacular cumulonimbus mammatus were associated with the advance of a massive thundercell over east-central North Dakota on July 4, 1982.
This photograph was taken just west of Jamestown, North Dakota.
www.ndsu.nodak.edu /nd_geology/nd_weather/mammatus_jamestown1.htm   (70 words)

  
 North Dakota Weather: Cumulonimbus Mammatus at Fargo, North Dakota   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-09)
North Dakota Weather: Cumulonimbus Mammatus at Fargo, North Dakota
CASS COUNTY, N.D. Click on the photo for an enlarged image.
Cumulonimbus mammatus associated with the advance of a thunderhead over Fargo, North Dakota, on June 19, 1994.
www.ndsu.nodak.edu /nd_geology/nd_weather/mammatus_fargo1.htm   (45 words)

  
 Webshots Community - Guestbook for Nuages : Cumulonimbus mammatus   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-09)
Webshots Community - Guestbook for Nuages : Cumulonimbus mammatus
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