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Topic: Cydippe


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In the News (Wed 24 Apr 19)

  
  Cydippe
Cydippe was the mother of Cleobis and Biton.
Cydippe, a priestess of Hera, was on her way to a festival in the goddess' honor.
Cydippe was the daughter of Hegetoria and Ochimus.
www.teachersparadise.com /ency/en/wikipedia/c/cy/cydippe.html   (170 words)

  
 Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Kleobis and Biton
In Greek mythology, Biton and Kleobis were Argives, the sons of Cydippe, a priestess of Hera.
Cydippe was travelling from Argos to a festival in honor of Argive Hera.
Cydippe was impressed with their devotion to her and her goddess and she prayed to Hera, asking her to give her children the best gift a god could to a mortal.
www.reference.com /browse/wiki/Kleobis_and_Biton   (408 words)

  
 Actinozoa
There is a general agreement among anatomists respecting the structure of the Ctenophora thus far; but the question whether they possess a nervous system and sensory organs or not, is as in the case of the Coralligena, one upon which there exist great diversity of opinion.
The body of Cestum is laterally compressed and elongated in a direction which corresponds to one of the transverse diameters of Cydippe, the ribbon-like band thus formed being sometimes three or even four feet long.
The tentacles are near the oral pole; the canals are ten in number; the medio-lateral canals terminate in trunks which follow the oral margin of the ribbon, and thus correspond to the circular canal of Beroe.
www.1902-encyclopedia.com /A/ACT/actinozoa.html   (3184 words)

  
 Heliadae
After, Cydippe grew old and married her uncle Cercaphus, who was his brother's (Ochimus) heir.
Cydippe had three sons: Lindos, Camirus, and Ialysus who due in course shared the island of Rhodes between them and founded three cities that bore their names.
Another culture or tradition says that Ochimus engaged Cydippe to a man called Ocridion, but Cercaphus who was in love with his niece, kidnapped her and fled away.
www.pantheon.org /articles/h/heliadae.html   (352 words)

  
 In Greek mythology Greek mythology Cleobis was the son of Cydippe...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-13)
In Greek mythology Greek mythology Cleobis was the son of Cydippe...
In Greek mythology Greek mythology, "Cleobis" was the son of Cydippe Cydippe and brother of Biton Biton.
Cydippe, a priestess of Hera Hera, was on her way to a festival in the goddess' honor.
www.biodatabase.de /Cleobis   (155 words)

  
 Cydippe - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The oxen which was to pull her cart and her and Cleobis pulled the cart the entire way (45 stadia; 8 km).
Cydippe was impressed with their devotion to her and asked Hera to give her children the best gift a god could give a person.
This page was last modified 18:16, 14 March 2006.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Cydippe   (159 words)

  
 Acontius - Acadine Archive   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-13)
Acontius was a youth in love with a maiden, Cydippe, whom he attempted to gain by a stratagem.
He threw an apple before her, on which was written, "I swear by Diana to marry Acontius." Cydippe read the words aloud, and as they were uttered in the sanctuary they were binding.
She did not heed them ; but as she was seized by one malady after another, she at length agreed to marry Acontius.
www.acadine.org /w/Acontius   (92 words)

  
 Building A Digital Feminary   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-13)
Cydippe, a priestess of Hera, was on her way to a festival in the goddess' honor.
Cydippe, in a story told by Callimachus and Ovid, was fooled by Acontius into swearing that she would marry him.
Acontius rolled a golden apple to her feet; she picked it up read out loud the words inscribe there: "I swear by the sacred shrine of the goddess that I will marry you." This oath was technically binding and she was forced into marriage.
www.darkshire.net /lizhenry/annotatrix/viewname.cgi?name_english=Cydippa   (211 words)

  
 Classics Log 9611b - Message Number 211   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-13)
You will recall that Acontius > trapped Cydippe by tossing her an apple on which were written the words > "I swear by Artemis to marry Acontius." Picking up the apple, Cydippe > duly read the words ALOUD and so was bound by the oath.
The underlying assumption is > that Acontius could ASSUME that Cydippe would read the message aloud, > thus ensuring that she would be trapped "verbis SUIS," not by "his" > words.
It should be.) > > But Cydippe's choice to read aloud (and perhaps we should assume she had a choice, and made the one that got her trapped) can't really be proof that this was the norm.
omega.cohums.ohio-state.edu /mailing_lists/CLA-L/Older/log96/9611b/9611b.211.html   (346 words)

  
 This and That » Blog Archive » Cleobis and Briton   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-13)
Cleobis and Briton were the sons of Cydippe.
Cydippe was a priestess of the goddess Juno.
But the statue was far away and Cydippe could not walk; the boys did not have an ox.
www.desalvo.org /blog?p=189   (226 words)

  
 ACOOMETI - LoveToKnow Article on ACOOMETI   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-13)
Akontios}, in Greek legend, a beautiful youth of the island of Ceos, the hero of a love-story told byCallimachus in a poem now lost, which forms the subject of two of Ovid's Heroides (xx., xxi.).
During the festival of Artemis at Delos, Acontius saw Cydippe, a well-born Athenian maiden of whom he was enamoured, sitting in the temple of the goddess.
He wrote on an apple the words, " I swear by the sacred shrine of the goddess that I will marry you," and threw it at her feet.
65.1911encyclopedia.org /A/AC/ACOOMETI.htm   (1385 words)

  
 Lang: Ambiguous Goats and Other Paradoxes in Callimachus' Acontius and Cydippe
Callimachus' Acontius and Cydippe recounts the story of Cydippe, a young woman of Naxos who had accidentally sworn to Artemis that she would marry only Acontius.
When Cydippe does so, however, with a betrothed who is not Acontius, she is stricken each time with severe illness until an appeal to the oracle reveals the cause of the problem and she can marry Acontius.
It is moreover only one of the means by which Acontius and Cydippe plays upon apparently simple frameworks of explanation - such as the etiological myth which is supposed to explain the Naxian marriage custom - which on closer examination juxtapose bedfellows at least as uneasy as Cydippe and her first betrothed.
www.camws.org /meeting/2005/abstracts2005/lang.html   (335 words)

  
 Biton and Cleobis on Encyclopedia.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-13)
BITON AND CLEOBIS [Biton and Cleobis], in Greek mythology, sons of the priestess Cydippe.
When their mother wanted to see a famous temple of Hera, which was many miles away, the brothers dragged her chariot there.
At the end of the long journey Cydippe prayed to Hera that her sons might receive the greatest of blessings.
www.encyclopedia.com /html/b/biton.asp   (139 words)

  
 Ochimus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The final two Heliadae, Ochimus and Cercaphus, stayed on the island of Rhodes.
He married Hegetoria and they had a daughter, Cydippe, who married Ochimus' brother, Cercaphus, who inherited the island.
This page was last modified 12:09, 19 January 2006.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Ochimus   (113 words)

  
 iqexpand.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-13)
In Greek mythology, Ocridion was a mortal who was engaged to Cydippe, daughter of Ochimus.
According to an alternate version, Ochimus engaged Cydippe to Ocridion (Ocridion : in greek mythology, ocridion was a mortal who was engaged to cydippe, daughter of
In Greek mythology Ocridion was a mortal who was engaged to Cydippe daughter of Ochimus She was kidnapped by her uncle Cercaphus
ocridion.iqexpand.com /index.php?title=Ocridion&action=edit   (226 words)

  
 Cydippe - TheBestLinks.com - Greek mythology, Hera, Cleobis, Biton, ...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-13)
Cydippe - TheBestLinks.com - Greek mythology, Hera, Cleobis, Biton,...
Cydippe, Greek mythology, Hera, Cleobis, Biton, Ochimus, Cercaphus, Hegetoria...
You can add this article to your own "watchlist" and receive e-mail notification about all changes in this page.
www.thebestlinks.com /Cydippe.html   (195 words)

  
 Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, page 170   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-13)
The later Greek prose romances were founded upon this version.
Cydippe was the daughter of a well-born Athenian.
It happened that she and Acontlus, a youth from the island of Cfios, who was in love with her, had come at the same time to a festival of Artemis at Delos.
www.ancientlibrary.com /seyffert/0173.html   (721 words)

  
 Classics Log 9611b - Message Number 205   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-13)
You will recall that Acontius trapped Cydippe by tossing her an apple on which were written the words "I swear by Artemis to marry Acontius." Picking up the apple, Cydippe duly read the words ALOUD and so was bound by the oath.
The underlying assumption is that Acontius could ASSUME that Cydippe would read the message aloud, thus ensuring that she would be trapped "verbis SUIS," not by "his" words.
I continue to believe that Augustine was indeed unfamiliar with the technique of silent reading before he saw Ambrose doing it, but I grant that Ptolemy does indeed offer impressive evidence that there were habitual silent readers in antiquity---"specialist readers," true, but silent readers nonetheless.
omega.cohums.ohio-state.edu /mailing_lists/CLA-L/Older/log96/9611b/9611b.205.html   (463 words)

  
 Syon Park: Butterflies in the Park - 24 February 2003
Cethosia cydippe is drinking sugared fruit juice from a scouring pad in a saucer.
Another Cethosia cydippe was sitting on a leaf.
This is a humming bird in the butterfly house.
www.mjausson.com /2003/walk24Feb03.htm   (619 words)

  
 Answers. Wheelock 7.   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-13)
Cleobis and Biton were the sons of Cydippe.
But the statue was far off, and Cydippe was not able to walk; the boys did not have oxen.
The work was difficult, but the sons of Cydippe were strong.
www.uark.edu /campus-resources/dlevine/Wheelock7.html   (536 words)

  
 Middle East Open Encyclopedia: Cydippe   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-13)
This is an extract from The Middle East Open Encyclopedia, made possible through the Wikimedia Foundation.
Iraq Museum International always displays the most recent published revision of the source article, Cydippe; all previous versions may be viewed here.
They link directly to authoring tools for you to start writing a particular article.
www.baghdadmuseum.org /ref?title=Cydippe   (279 words)

  
 Cydippe * People, Places, & Things * Greek Mythology: From the Iliad to the Fall of the Last Tyrant
Cydippe * People, Places, and Things * Greek Mythology: From the Iliad to the Fall of the Last Tyrant
Cut and paste the following text for use in a paper or electronic document report.
"People, Places and Things: Cydippe", Greek Mythology: From the Iliad to the Fall of the Last Tyrant.
www.messagenet.com /myths/ppt/Cydippe_1.html   (221 words)

  
 Bryn Mawr Classical Review 96.12.1
The coincidence shows that new energies are focusing on the double letters: one looks forward to a commentary on Acontius & Cydippe, although P.A.M. Thompson, Ovid, Heroides 20 and 21: a commentary with introduction, diss.
Those who love the idea of a linear evolution in the poet's mood and style can be interested in the idea that 16-21 have their own dark side, after all (the incineration of Troy, Leander drowning near the Black Sea, Cydippe's unjust suffering).
A general bonus in Kenney's interpretation is that Cydippe's perspective and suffering are valorized, against recurring attempts to read the plot as a bland narrative about happy endings and mutual love.
ccat.sas.upenn.edu /bmcr/1996/96.12.01.html   (3593 words)

  
 Cleobis
The son of Cydippe, a priestess of Hera on Argos, and brother of Biton.
One day when their mother was going to a festival in Hera's honor, the oxen which would pull the cart were overdue.
Article "Cleobis" created on 21 April 1999; last modified on 21 April 1999 (Revision 1).
www.pantheon.org /articles/c/cleobis.html   (98 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-13)
Sed procul erat statua, et Cydippe ambulare non poterat; pueri boves non habebant.
Labor erat arduus, sed filii Cydippes robusti erant.
Da igitur meis filiis optimum praemium." Propter preces Cydippes Iuno pueris sine mora mortem sine dolore dedit.
www.clas.ufl.edu /users/tjohnson/tj/cleobis.html   (102 words)

  
 Definition of cydippe - Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary
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For More Information on "cydippe " go to Britannica.com
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www.m-w.com /dictionary/cydippe   (85 words)

  
 A Smaller Classical Dictionary of Biography, Mythology and Geography - bele, Cybistra, Cyclades, Cyclops, Cycnus, ...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-13)
A Smaller Classical Dictionary of Biography, Mythology and Geography - bele, Cybistra, Cyclades, Cyclops, Cycnus, Cydippe, Cydnus, Cydonia, Cyllarus, Cyllene, Cylon, Cyme, Cynaegirus, Cynesii, Cynosarges, Cynoscephalae, Cynossema
This page contains descriptions for the following names Cybele, Cybistra, Cyclades, Cyclops, Cycnus, Cydippe, Cydnus, Cydonia, Cyllarus, Cyllene, Cylon, Cyme, Cynaegirus, Cynesii, Cynosarges, Cynoscephalae, Cynossema
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www.classicaldictionary.bravepages.com /132.htm   (85 words)

  
 OVID: The Heroides XVI to XXI
Ah me! Cydippe, I fear to tell you the truth,
Now that this cruel man, Cydippe, fights for his unjust cause,
It’s he who made you ill, and mistrusted by Diana: given that,
www.tkline.freeserve.co.uk /Heroides16-21.htm   (13851 words)

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