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Topic: Cyrillic numerals


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  Decimal - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography
It is the most widely used numeral system, perhaps because humans have four fingers and a thumb on each hand, giving a total of ten digits over both hands.
Decimal notation is the writing of numbers in the base-ten numeral system, which uses various symbols (called digits) for ten distinct values (0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9) to represent numbers.
The symbols for the digits in common use around the globe today are called Arabic numerals by Europeans and Indian numerals by Arabs, the two groups' terms both referring to the culture from which they learned the system.
www.arikah.com /encyclopedia/Decimal   (1490 words)

  
  Cyrillic alphabet - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The theory is further supported by the fact that the Cyrillic alphabet replaced almost completely the Glagolitic one in northeastern Bulgaria as early as the end of the 10th century, whereas the Ohrid Literary School —where Saint Clement worked—continued to use the Glagolitic alphabet until the 12th century.
Although Cyril is almost certainly not the author of the Cyrillic alphabet, his contributions to Glagolitic alphabet and hence to the Cyrillic alphabet are still recognised, as the latter is named after him.
Cyrillic upper - and lowercase letter-forms are not as differentiated as in Latin typography.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Cyrillic_alphabet   (2631 words)

  
 Cyrillic numerals - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Cyrillic numerals was a numbering system derived from the Cyrillic alphabet, used by South and East Slavic peoples.
The system was quasi-decimal, based on the Ionian numeral system and written with the corresponding graphemes of the Cyrillic alphabet.
Glagolitic numerals worked similarly, except numeric values were assigned according to the native alphabetic order of the Glagolitic alphabet, rather than inherited from the order of the Greek alphabet.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Cyrillic_numerals   (210 words)

  
 Numeral System [Definition]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
Binary (2) The binary or base-two numeral system is a system for representing numbers in which a radix of two is used; that is, each digit in a binary numeral may have either of two different values.
Numeral systems are sometimes called number systems, but that name is misleading: different systems of numbers, such as the system of real numbers, the system of complex numbers The complex numbers are an extension of the real numbers, in which all non-constant polynomials have roots.
The simplest numeral system is the unary numeral system The unary numeral system is the simplest numeral system to represent natural numbers: in order to represent a number N, an arbitrarily chosen symbol is repeated N times.
www.wikimirror.com /Numeral_system   (3283 words)

  
 Roman numerals - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
In general, the number zero did not have its own Roman numeral, but the concept of zero as a number was well known by all medieval computists (responsible for calculating the date of Easter).
The lack of a zero digit prevented Roman numerals from developing into a positional notation, and led to their gradual replacement by Arabic numerals in the early second millennium.
Roman numerals remained in common use until about the 14th century, when they were replaced by Arabic numerals (thought to have been introduced to Europe from al-Andalus, by way of Arab traders and arithmetic treatises, around the 11th century).
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Roman_numerals   (2414 words)

  
 Book Encyclopedia - Web Library   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
Arabic numerals (also called Hindu numerals or Hindu-Arabic numerals) are the most common form set of symbols used to represent numbers.
The Arabic numeral system is a positional base 10 numeral system with 10 distinct symbols representing the 10 numerical digits.
In a more developed form, the Arabic numeral system also uses a decimal marker (at first a mark over the ones digit but now more usually a decimal point or a decimal comma which separates the ones place from the tenths place), and also a symbol for “these digits repeat ad infinitum ” (recur).
www.bookencyclopedia.com /index.php?title=Arabic_numerals   (952 words)

  
 Articles - Greek numerals   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
In modern Greece, they are still in use for ordinal numbers, and in much the same situations as Roman numerals are in the West; for ordinary numbers, Arabic numerals are used.
The earliest system of numerals in Greek was acrophonic, operating much like Roman numerals (which derived from this scheme), with the following acrophonic formula: Ι = 1, Π = 5, Δ = 10, Η = 100, Χ = 1000, and Μ = 10000.
The alphabetic system operates on the additive principle in which the numeric values of the letters are added together to form the total.
www.ujug.com /articles/Greek_numerals   (631 words)

  
 Cyrillic alphabet
The layout of the alphabet is derived from the early Cyrillic alphabet, itself a derivative of the Glagolitic alphabet, a ninth century uncial cursive usually credited to two brothers from Thessaloniki, Saint Cyril and Saint Methodius.
Although Cyril is almost certainly not the author of the Cyrillic alphabet, his contributions to the Glagolitic and hence to the Cyrillic alphabet are still recognised, as the latter is named after him.
Cyrillic uppercase and lowercase letter-forms are not as differentiated as in Latin typography.
www.dejavu.org /cgi-bin/get.cgi?ver=93&url=http://articles.gourt.com/%22http%3A%2F%2Farticles.gourt.com%2F%3Farticle%3DCyrillic   (3040 words)

  
 Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Cyrillic alphabet
The layout of the alphabet is derived from the early Cyrillic alphabet, itself a derivative of the Glagolitic alphabet, a ninth century uncial cursive usually credited to two Byzantine monk brothers from Thessaloniki, Saint Cyril and Saint Methodius.
The theory is supported by the fact that the Cyrillic alphabet almost completely replaced the Glagolitic in northeastern Bulgaria as early as the end of the tenth century, whereas the Ohrid Literary School—where Saint Clement worked—continued to use the Glagolitic until the twelfth century.
The Cyrillic alphabet was used for the Azerbaijani language from 1939 to 1991.
www.reference.com /browse/wiki/Cyrillic   (3329 words)

  
 Early Cyrillic alphabet at AllExperts
The original Cyrillic alphabet was a writing system developed in the First Bulgarian Empire in the tenth century to write the Old Church Slavonic liturgical language.
Cyril, a missionary who, along with his brother, Methodius, is credited for inventing the Glagolitic alphabet, an earlier Slavic alphabet and an influence on this one.
In Russian, Gherv or Dzherv is only used in modern scientific texts where Cyrillic is used to transliterate Glagolitic; the character is found in some Balkan languages, notably the languages of the former Yugoslavia.# Ornate omega: The name of this glyph is unknown; it would seem to be used in interjections, especially before vocatives.
en.allexperts.com /e/e/ea/early_cyrillic_alphabet.htm   (649 words)

  
 Business Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
Roman numerals are commonly used today in numbered lists (in outline format), clockfaces, pages preceding the main body of a book, and the numbering of movie sequels.
Just as an old clock recorded the hour by roman numerals while minutes were measured in arabic numerals, in this system, the month was in roman numerals while the day was in arabic numerals, e.g.
John Wallis is often credited for introducing this symbol to represent infinity, and one conjecture is that he based it off of this usage, since 1,000 was hyperbolically used to represent very large numbers.
www.bizencyclopedia.com /index.php?title=Roman_numerals   (2391 words)

  
 Early Cyrillic alphabet
The Early Cyrillic alphabet was a writing system developed in Bulgaria during the 10th century A.D. for the writing of Old Church Slavonic.
Cyril, a missionary who, along with his brother, Methodius, is credited with inventing the Glagolitic alphabet, an earlier Slavic alphabet and an influence on this one.
In the following centuries, the Early Cyrillic was replaced by a later form, the Modern Cyrillic alphabet, which is still widely in use throughout Asia and Eastern Europe.
www.arikah.net /encyclopedia/Early_Cyrillic_alphabet   (685 words)

  
 Articles - Arabic numerals   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
Arabic numerals (also called Hindu numerals or Indian numerals) are the most common set of symbols used to represent numbers.
The term "Arabic numerals" is actually a misnomer, since what are known in English as "Arabic numerals" were neither invented nor widely used by the Arabs.
The numeral set known in English as 'Arabic numerals'; is a positional base 10 numeral system with ten distinct symbols representing the 10 numerical digits.
www.lcdproctor.com /articles/Arabic_numeral   (938 words)

  
 Writing Mongol in Uighur Script
The soft sign and the hard sign in Cyrillic as well as an alternate Cyrillic vowel for 'I' are all transcribed as the letter 'I' in Old Script.
Cyrillic punctuation marks reoriented for vertical use are shown in Table 23.
Cyrillic punctuation marks with unchanged orientation are shown in Table 24.
www.viahistoria.com /SilverHorde/research/UighurScript.html   (3677 words)

  
 cyrillic_numerals   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
Khmer Mayan Roman Cyrillic Thai Binary (2) Ternary (3) Octal (8) Decimal (10) Hexadecimal (16) edit Cyrillic numerals was a numbering system derived from the Cyrillic alphabet, used by South and East Slavic...
Cyrillic numerals was a numbering system derived from the Cyrillic alphabet, used by South and East Slavic...
Japanese Khmer Mayan Roman Cyrillic Thai Binary (2) Octal (8) Decimal (10) Hexadecimal (16) edit Cyrillic numerals was a numbering system derived from the Cyrillic alphabet, used by South and East Slavic peoples...
cyrillic_numerals.networklive.org   (299 words)

  
 Numerals
The Milesian numeric system has the same basis as the Hebrew: 9 letters are assigned to each of the units 1-9, 9 letters to the tens 10-90, and 9 letters to the hundreds 100-900.
As a result, the numeric versions of the characters drifted away from their original natures—aided by the fact that the numerals got uncial and thence lowercase versions as they were incorporated into the mediaeval development of the Greek script, whereas the archaic letters remained frozen on stone, and forgotten by the scribes.
The identification of the Ionic letter with the numeral is conjectural, and Jeffery herself titles the letter "sampi" in scare-quotes, because she does not believe that was the original name of the letter.
ptolemy.tlg.uci.edu /~opoudjis/unicode/numerals.html   (3758 words)

  
 Phi [Definition]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
The upper-case letter Ο is used as a symbol for: The Big O notation, representing the asymptotic rate of growth of a function in mathematics.
When used as a numeral, digamma is written using the stigma (,), a ligature of sigma and tau, or as the sequence στ/ΣΤ.
In the system of Greek numerals Greek numerals are a system of representing numbers using letters of the Greek alphabet.
www.wikimirror.com /Phi   (2023 words)

  
 Arabic numerals Summary
Arabic numerals, known formally as Hindu-Arabic numerals, and also known as Indian numerals, Hindu numerals, European numerals, and Western numerals, are the most common symbolic representation of numbers around the world.
The first mentions of the numerals in the West are found in the Codex Vigilanus of 976 [2].
The European acceptance of the numerals was accelerated by the invention of the printing press, and they became commonly known during the 15th century.
www.bookrags.com /Arabic_numerals   (1392 words)

  
 ctan/language/cyrillic/   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
Reviews cyrillic transliteration will be converted directly to cyrillic text.
An alternate input form is available for most cyrillic letters which are not transliterated by the equivalent single roman letters.
Numerals and punctuation follow the normal input conventions for roman.
www.ptf.com /ptf/products/TEX/current/sav/0119.0   (106 words)

  
 Roman numerals Summary
The Roman numeral system for representing numbers was developed around 500 B.C. As the Romans conquered much of the world that was known to them, their numeral system spread throughout Europe, where Roman numerals remained the primary manner for representing numbers for centuries.
Roman numerals are commonly used today in numbered lists (in outline format), clockfaces, pages preceding the main body of a book, chord triads in music analysis, the numbering of movie sequels, book publication dates, successive rulers with identical names, and the numbering of some sport events, such as the Olympic Games or the Super Bowls.
Roman numerals remained in common use until about the 14th century, when they were replaced by Arabic numerals (thought to have been introduced to Europe from al-Andalus, by way of Arab traders and arithmetic treatises, around the 11th century).
www.bookrags.com /Roman_numerals   (5184 words)

  
 User:Gabriel Svoboda/Slovianski-P - Langmaker   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
The Cyrillic letter ј instead of "й" was adopted for the reason that the combinations of "й" with vowels ("йа", "йе", "йи", "йо", "йу") are either unnatural or very rare in Slavic langauges, while ја, је, ји, јо, ју are OK.
In Cyrillic, Ukrainians should note that the letter г should ideally be pronounced as their [ґ].
As far as non-Slavic names are concerned, it is better to find the pronunciaiton in Cyrillic articles only because the Latin articles may tend to keep the original spelling somewhat.
www.langmaker.com /db/User:Gabriel_Svoboda/Slovianski-P   (3456 words)

  
 Cyrillic numerals Information
Cyrillic numerals was a numbering system derived from the Cyrillic alphabet, used by South and East Slavic peoples.
The system was used in Russia as late as the 1700s when Peter the Great replaced it with the Hindu-Arabic numeral system.
The system was quasi-decimal, based on the Ionian numeral system and written with the corresponding graphemes of the Cyrillic alphabet.
www.bookrags.com /Cyrillic_numerals   (231 words)

  
 Tsherim Soobzokov Tshering Chhoden   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
Today, most often it is transliterated as c or, without the diacritic, as c; less frequent transliterations are tj, ty, cj, cy, ch (also used for che) and tch.
As it is one of the letters unique to the Serbian language, and also the letter with which the Serbian word for Cyrillic (ћирилица) starts, tshe is often used as basis for logo s of various groups involved with Cyrillic alphabet; for examples see [1], [2], [3].
Octal The octal numeral system is the base 8 number system, and uses the digits 0 7.
www.masterliness.com /a/Tshe.htm   (554 words)

  
 Highbeam Encyclopedia - Search Results for Alpha-Bits   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
Cyrillic Alphabet based on Greek letter forms that is now used for writing several Slavic languages, most notably Russian and Serbian.
Cyrillic The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology...
Cyrillic of the alphabet used by Slavonic peoples in the Eastern Church, the invention of which is traditionally attributed to the Greek missionary Cyril (IX).
www.encyclopedia.com /SearchResults.aspx?Q=Alpha-Bits&StartAt=51   (600 words)

  
 Linguistics 201: The Alphabet
The English alphabet is a variety of the Roman.  The IPA can even be thought of as essentially a Latin-based script; as is modern Navajo and languages completely unrelated to the languages of Europe.
Cyrillic was devised to write the language of the East-European Slavs in the 10th century by Byzantine Greek missionaries.
      After Cyril's death, opposition to Glagolitic from the Roman branch of the church leads to the invention of another Slavic alphabet deliberately patterned closely on Greek.
pandora.cii.wwu.edu /vajda/ling201/test4materials/Writing3.htm   (832 words)

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