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Topic: Cyrus I of Anshan


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In the News (Thu 24 Jul 14)

  
 A Commentary on Cyrus
According to Cyrus, in an inscription written in 539 he was king of Anshan and he traces his decent as king of Persia and their extent of power beyond that city is very vague.
Cyrus destroys the city showing the Babylonians that if they resist they will be crushed, He comes on to the next town, Sipper and takes the town without conquest and the message had obviously got across to the Babylonians.
Cyrus tries to persuade Tomyris to be one of his wives and she refuses so he decides to wage war and builds a bridge over the river Araxes.
www.herodotuswebsite.co.uk /cyrus.htm   (3060 words)

  
  Cyrus - LoveToKnow 1911
Anshan is a district of Elam or Susiana, the exact position of which is still subject to much discussion.
633 C), Cyrus is the son of a poor Mardian bandit Atradates (the Mardians are a nomadic Persian tribe, Herod.
Cyrus managed very cleverly to gather a large army by beginning a quarrel with Tissaphernes, satrap of Caria, about the Ionian towns; he also pretended to prepare an expedition against the Pisidians, a mountainous tribe in the Taurus, which was never obedient to the Empire.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /Cyrus   (2471 words)

  
 NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Anzan
Anshan was the birthplace of Ann Hui (born Hong Kong-based film director, one of the most critically acclaimed amongst the Hong Kong New Wave.
Anshan (or Anzan) (in Persian انشان;) was also a city and small kingdom in Persia (Iran) during the 1st millennium BC, ruled by the Achaemenid dynasty.
Anshan embarked on a period of conquest in the 6th century BC and became the nucleus of the Persian empire.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Anzan   (370 words)

  
 Iransaga - Cyrus the Great, The Historical Account
Cyrus left his general Harpagus behind to consolidate the Persian position, and shortly afterwards Lycia, Caria and even the Greek cities of Asia Minor were added to his newly founded Persian empire.
Cyrus, however, legitimized his succession as king by 'taking the hand of the god Bel' and his persuasive propaganda convinced the Babylonians that Marmuk, their supreme deity, had directed his steps towards the city.
Cyrus was now master of an area stretching from the Mediterranean to eastern Iran and from the fl sea to the borders of Arabia.
www.art-arena.com /cyrus2.htm   (1371 words)

  
 Cyrus I of Anshan information - Search.com
Cyrus I (Old Persian Koroush), was King of Anshan from c.
Cyrus was an early member of the Achaemenid dynasty.
He was apparently a grandson of its founder Achaemenes and son of Teispes of Anshan.
www.search.com /reference/Cyrus_I   (518 words)

  
 History of Iran: Cyrus Charter of Human Rights
This is a confirmation that the Charter of freedom of Humankind issued by Cyrus the Great on his coronation day in Babylon could be considered superior to the Human Rights Manifesto issued by the French revolutionaries in their first national assembly.
Cyrus the Great entered the city of Babylon in 539 BCE, and after the winter, on the first day of spring, he was officially crowned:
The description of the coronation of Cyrus is the most elaborate one in the world written by the Greek philosopher, politician, and historian Xenephon (Cyropaedia of Xenophon, The Life of Cyrus The Great).
www.iranchamber.com /history/cyrus/cyrus_charter.php   (932 words)

  
 Cyrus the Great at AllExperts
Cyrus the Great was the son of the Persian king Cambyses I and a Mede princess from the Achaemenid dynasty, which ruled the kingdom of Anshan, in what is now southwestern Iran.
Cyrus was distinguished equally as a statesman and as a soldier.
Cyrus' conquests began a new era in the age of empire building where a large superstate, comprising many dozens of countries, races, and languages, were ruled under a single administration headed by a central government.
en.allexperts.com /e/c/cy/cyrus_the_great.htm   (3060 words)

  
  Persian Empire - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Cyrus rallied the Persians together, and in 550 BC defeated the forces of Astyages, who was then captured by his own nobles and turned over to the triumphant Cyrus, now Shah of a unified Persian kingdom.
Cyrus was killed during a battle against the Massagetae or Sakas.
Cyrus' son, Cambyses II, annexed Egypt to the Achaemenid Empire.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Persian_Empire   (4761 words)

  
 Sohail Forouzan-sepehr's Website: Cyrus the Great
Cyrus, the son of a Persian noble and a Mede princess, was from the Achaemenid Dynasty, which ruled the kingdom of Anshan, in what is now southwestern Iran.
Cyrus had two sons: Cambyses and Smerdis, as well as several daughters, of whom Atossa is significant since she married Darius I of Persia and was mother of Xerxes I of Persia.
Cyrus' spectacular conquests continued the age of empire building, established by his predecessors, the Babylonians and Assyrians, and carried out by his successors, including the Greeks and Romans.
www.sfsepehr.com /Sohail/cyrus_the_great.htm   (1494 words)

  
 Cyrus Charter of Human Rights - First Charter of Right of Nations - Cyrus Cylinder of he Rights of Nations, First Human ...
For his acts of kindness, Cyrus the Great is immortalized in the Bible in several passages and called "the anointed of the Lord".
In the book of Isaiah, Cyrus, the King of Persia, a non-Jew was called the "mash'aka" God, according to Isaiah when he wrote:.Thus said the Lord to his 'mash'aka (anointed), to Cyrus.
Ezra tells the story of the departure of the exiles from Babylonia: "King Cyrus himself brought out the vessels of the house of the LORD that Nebuchadnezzar had carried away from Jerusalem and placed in the house of his gods" (Ezra 1:7).
www.farsinet.com /cyrus   (3294 words)

  
 About Iran
Cyrus (Kourosh in Persian; Kouros in Greek) is regarded as one of the most outstanding figures in history.
Cyrus succeeded in overthrowing his grandfather and became the ruler of the united Medes and Persians....
It describes how the baby Cyrus, abandoned in the woods by a shepherd, is fed by a dog until the shepherd returns with his wife and takes the infant into their care.
www.postchi.com /main/Iran/History/English/cyrus.php   (2453 words)

  
 Cyrus The Great - Home
Cyrus was the greatest Persian Emperor and a righteous human being.
Comparing Cyrus' manner with Semi's rulers, one feels great pleasure for the Persian liberality and generosity and truly regards the Persian as the instructor of human race.
According to the historian Herodotus (i.46), Cyrus was the son of Cambyses I. He came to the Persian throne in 559 B.C. Nine years later he conquered the Medes, thus unifying the kingdoms of the Medes and the Persians.
www.cyrusgreat.com   (283 words)

  
 Cyrus Cylinder
Cyrus had no thought of forcing conquered people into a single mould, and had the wisdom to leave unchanged the institution of each kingdom he attached to the Persian Crown.
At my deeds Marduk, the great Lord, rejoiced, and to me, Cyrus, the king who worshipped, and to Cambyses, my son, the offspring of my loins, and to all my troops, he graciously gave his blessing, and in good spirit is before him we/glorified/exceedingly his high divinity.
The Gods of Sumer and Akkad whom Nabonidus had, to the anger of the Lord of the Gods, brought into Babylon, I at the bidding of Marduk, the great Lord made to dwell in peace in their habitations, delightful abodes.
habib.pourassad.com /Cyrus.htm   (430 words)

  
 AncientWeb.org: Ancient Persia - The Art, Culture and History of the Ancient Middle East
Cyrus rallied the Persians together, and in 550 BC defeated the forces of Astyages, who was then captured by his own nobles and turned over to the triumphant Cyrus, now Shah of the Persian kingdom.
The Cyrus Cylinder is an artifact of the Persian Empire, consisting of a declaration inscribed on a clay barrel.
Cyrus was killed during a battle against the Massagetae or Sakas.
www.ancientweb.org /Persia   (2190 words)

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