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Topic: Darius II of Persia


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  Darius (WebBible Encyclopedia) - ChristianAnswers.Net
(2.) Darius, king of Persia, was the son of Hystaspes, of the royal family of the Achaemenidae.
But soon after his death and the accession of Darius, the Jews resumed their work, thinking that the edict of Smerdis would be now null and void, as Darius was in known harmony with the religious policy of Cyrus.
It was not found at Babylon, but at Achmetha (Ezra 6:2); and Darius forthwith issued a new decree, giving the Jews full liberty to prosecute their work, at the same time requiring the Syrian satrap and his subordinates to give them all needed help.
www.christiananswers.net /dictionary/darius.html   (369 words)

  
  Persia - HighBeam Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Darius was also a patron of the arts, and magnificent palaces standing on high terraces beautified the capitals of Susa and Persepolis (see Persian art and architecture).
When Darius II died, the most celebrated of the dynastic troubles occurred in the rebellion of Cyrus the Younger against Artaxerxes II, which came to an end with the death of Cyrus in the battle of Cunaxa (401 BC).
Darius, last of the great kings, fled east before the conqueror to the remote province of Bactria, where he was assassinated by his own cousin, Bessus.
www.encyclopedia.com /doc/1E1-persia.html   (2070 words)

  
 Darius
Another explanation, plausible enough, is that Darius is another name for Cyaxares II, the son of Astyages, who according to the Greek writer Xenophon was Cyrus’ uncle and father-in-law, and whom Cyrus might have retained temporarily as a figurehead king to please the Medes.
Darius was evidently recognised as a ruler in Babylon by courtesy of Cyrus, while it was Cyrus who actually held the power (see Is 45:1).
Darius the Persian (Neh 12:22) is probably Darius II (424/23–405/04 b.c.), the son and successor of Artaxerxes I. The various lists of ecclesiastical officers given in the book of Nehemiah seem to have their terminal point in his reign.
www.nisbett.com /people/bp-darius.htm   (907 words)

  
 Persia
Persia proper was a tract of no very large dimensions on the Persian Gulf, which is still known as Fars or Farsistan, a corruption of the ancient appellation.
Persia was doubtless in early times included in Elam, and its population was then either Semitic or allied to the Accadians, who founded more than one state in the Babylonian plain.
It was reconquered and thoroughly organized by Darius, the son of Hystaspes, whose dominions extended from India to the Danube.
holycall.com /biblemaps/persia.htm   (1071 words)

  
 PERSIA
Darius was the leader of the "Ten Thousand Immortals," a group of elite spearmen that formed the fighting core of the Persian army.
Darius was also aided by the intense loyalty he had been able to create among his followers while he was the leader of the Persian army.
Darius had the man taken of the cross before he died after considering another of the laws which insisted that one wrong deed might be pardoned if it was outweighed by a record of good.
www.worldhistory1a.homestead.com /PERSIA.html   (6707 words)

  
 Persia - MSN Encarta
Darius I, who ascended the throne in 522 bc, pushed the Persian borders as far eastward as the Indus River, had a canal constructed from the Nile to the Red Sea, and reorganized the entire empire, earning the title Darius the Great.
Darius died while preparing a new expedition against the Greeks; his son and successor, Xerxes I, attempted to fulfill his plan but met defeat in the great sea engagement the Battle of Salamís in 480 bc and in two successive land battles in the following year.
During the reign of Artaxerxes I, the second son of Xerxes, the Egyptians revolted, aided by the Greeks; although the revolt was finally suppressed in 446 bc, it signaled the first major assault against, and the beginning of the decline of, the Persian Empire.
encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761564512/Persia.html   (1139 words)

  
 Darius (550 - 486 B.C.)
Darius attempted several times to conquer Greece; his fleet was destroyed by a storm in 492, and the Athenians defeated his army at Marathon in 490.
Darius was the son of Hystaspes, the satrap (provincial governor) of Parthia.
Darius was the greatest royal architect of his dynasty, and during his reign Persian architecture assumed a style that remained unchanged until the end of the empire.
www.thelatinlibrary.com /imperialism/notes/darius.html   (1220 words)

  
 Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Darius II of Persia
Darius II, originally called Ochus and often surnamed Nothus (from Greek νοθος, meaning 'bastard'), was emperor of Persia from 423 BC to 404 BC.
After a month and a half Xerxes II was murdered by his brother Secydianus or Sogdianus (the form of the name is uncertain).
In 404 BC Darius II died after a reign of nineteen years, and was followed by Artaxerxes II.
www.reference.com /browse/wiki/Darius_II_of_Persia   (317 words)

  
 ipedia.com: Darius III of Persia Article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
After the ambitious vizier Bagoas murdered King Artaxerxes III of Persia in 338 BC, and his son King Arses in 336 BC, Bagoas sought to install a new monarch who would be easier to control.
In 336 BC Philip II of Macedon promised to avenge an old religious offense by the Persians, and sent an army into Asia Minor to "liberate" the Greeks living under Persian control.
In 333 BC Darius himself took the field against the Macedonian king, but was beaten at Issus and Alexander took control of Persia.
www.ipedia.com /darius_iii_of_persia.html   (317 words)

  
 Banks/Dean Genealogy - Person Page 224
Darius II of Persia Ochus (Bastard) married Parysatis (?), daughter of King Artaxerxes I of Persia and Andia (?).
Parysatis (?) married Darius II of Persia Ochus (Bastard), son of King Artaxerxes I of Persia and Kosmartydene (?).
Stateira (?) married King Artaxerxes II of Persia, son of Darius II of Persia Ochus (Bastard) and Parysatis (?).
www.gordonbanks.com /gordon/family/2nd_Site/geb-p/p224.htm   (2711 words)

  
 Persian Empire, Persopolis - Crystalinks
Persia's earliest known kingdom was the proto-Elamite Empire, followed by the Medes; but it is the Achaemenid Empire that emerged under Cyrus the Great that is usually the earliest to be called "Persian." Successive states in Iran before 1935 are collectively called the Persian Empire by Western historians.
Darius (Greek form Dareios) is a classicized form of the Old Persian Daraya-Vohumanah, Darayavahush or Darayavaush, which was the name of three kings of the Achaemenid Dynasty of Persia: Darius I (the Great), ruled 522-486 BCE, Darius II (Ochos), ruled 423-405/4 BCE, and Darius III (Kodomannos), ruled 336-330 BCE.
Darius was the greatest of all the Persian kings.
www.crystalinks.com /persia.html   (2708 words)

  
 History of Greece
In 519 BC Darius I ascended the throne of the expanding empire of Persia.
Darius managed to subdue things in a five-year campaign, and became hell-bent on revenge against Athens, one of the few states outside the area that had helped the insurgents.
Darius died in 485 BC before his plans for another attempt reached fruition, so it was left to his son Xerxes to fulfill his father’s ambition of conquering Greece.
www.geocities.com /the_temple_of_ares/history.html   (1506 words)

  
 Chapter 1 : Nebuchadrezzar's Wars
Since Darius II died less that a year before Amasis' 44th year, this portion of the text might simply be referencing the reforms of Kbdj back to the conditions that prevailed in the days of Darius.
One set of economic rules held until the death of Darius II in his 19th year; another from the time of 44th year of Amasis until Kamoze became lord of Egypt in 399 B.C. The Chronicle is concerned primarily with the reforms of Kamoze/Kbdj during the Amyrtaeus rebellion.
Amasis was subservient to Artaxerxes I and Darius II.
www.kent.net /DisplacedDynasties/NebuchadnezzarChapter11.htm   (9532 words)

  
 King Darius III of Persia - Factasy
Darius III ruled as the final king of the Achaemenid dynasty of Persia.
Darius III was left with the tasks of strengthening the army to defend against Alexander the Great, who lead a united Greece and of reorganizing the government.
Darius III was ill prepared to battle the advancing Alexander and was defeated in the Battle of Issus in 333.
www.factasy.com /alexander/darius.shtml   (357 words)

  
 Darius II of Persia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Darius II, originally called Ochus and often surnamed Nothus (from Greek νοθος, meaning 'bastard'), was emperor of Persia from 423 BC to 404 BC.
After a month and a half Xerxes was murdered by his brother Secydianus or Sogdianus (the form of the name is uncertain).
In 404 BC Darius II died after a reign of nineteen years, and was followed by Artaxerxes II.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Darius_II_of_Persia   (330 words)

  
 Darius and the Bisutun Inscription
Darius’ Bisutun inscription has proven to be the ‘Rosetta Stone’ of the ancient near eastern languages, but with the distinction that, of the three languages inscribed therein, none had previously been deciphered by modern scholars.
Behind Darius are shown two of his supporters, slightly smaller in stature than Darius and carrying the implements which symbolize his power to rule.
Darius begins by explaining that the king Cambyses had a brother named Smerdis, and that Cambyses killed this brother (without the knowledge of the people of Persia).
www.visopsys.org /andy/essays/darius-bisitun.html   (2212 words)

  
 Timeline Persia
Darius defended this deed and his own assumption of kingship on the grounds that the usurper was actually Gaumata, a Magian, who had impersonated Bardiya after Bardiya had been murdered secretly by Cambyses.
519BC Darius of Persia authorized the Jews to rebuild the Temple at Jerusalem, in accordance with an earlier decree of Cyrus.
413BC Darius II, ruler of Persia, quelled a revolt in Lydia.
timelines.ws /countries/PERSIA.HTML   (4607 words)

  
 The Persians   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Darius I, who ascended the throne in 521BC, pushed the Persian borders as far eastward as the Indus River, had a canal constructed from the Nile to the Red Sea, and reorganized the entire empire, earning the title Darius the Great.
Darius died while preparing a new expedition against the Greeks; his son and successor, Xerxes I, attempted to fulfill his plan but met defeat in the great sea engagement the Battle of Salamís in 480BC and in two successive land battles in the following year.
Centered on the Persian homeland on the northeastern shore of the Persian Gulf, it stretched from present-day Pakistan in the east to the Balkan Peninsula in the west and from the Persian Gulf in the south to Central Asia in the north.
history-world.org /persians.htm   (3316 words)

  
 Persians, Darius The First   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Darius I, called the Great, tells the story of the overthrow of Bardiya and of the first year of his own rule in detail in his famous royal inscription cut on a rock face at the base of Bisitun mountain, a few miles east of modern Kermanshah.
Darius was a member of the Achaemenid royal house.
Darius himself was in the mold of Cyrus the Great--a powerful personality and a dynamic ruler.
history-world.org /darius_i.htm   (890 words)

  
 Darius Lyrics
Darius Milhaud - Darius Milhaud () (September 4, 1892 – June 22, 1974) was a French composer and teacher.
Darius - Darius (in Persian داريوش (Dah-rii-yoosh)) is a common Persian male name.
Darius III of Persia - Darius III or Codomannus (c.
www.go2lyrics.com /darius-lyrics-artist.html   (178 words)

  
 Darius II of Persia Biography
Darius II, originally called Ochus, was emperor of Persia from 423 BC to 404 BC.
Ochus adopted the name Darius (in the chronicles he is called Nothos, meaning "the bastard").
In 404 Darius II died after a reign of nineteen years, and was followed by Artaxerxes II.
www.biographybase.com /biography/Darius_II_of_Persia.html   (262 words)

  
 Behistun (Bisitun) - Monument of Darius, King of Persia
Darius' monument, displayed in a picture, and text printed in three languages, was critical to scholars who used the texts as a way to decipher the Persian and Babylonian languages.
It begins with the genealogy of Darius, traced direct to Achaemenes, and then refers to the reign of Cambyses, who had preceded Darius, the murder of Smerdis (the brother of Cambyses), and the revolt of the Persians during the absence of Cambyses on his campaign in Egypt.
It was Darius, the son of Hystaspes, who challenged the usurper, and, marching against him with a small force, slew him and took the throne.
mcadams.posc.mu.edu /txt/ah/Persia/Behistun.html   (8136 words)

  
 Persia. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05
Ultimately Darius’ army was defeated at Marathon, and his son Xerxes I, who succeeded to the throne in 486
When Darius II died, the most celebrated of the dynastic troubles occurred in the rebellion of Cyrus the Younger against Artaxerxes II, which came to an end with the death of Cyrus in the battle of Cunaxa (401
B.C., continued to revolt and the efforts of the armies of Artaxerxes II to reassert control were fruitless.
www.bartleby.com /65/pe/Persia.html   (1898 words)

  
 Persia History Timeline
539 BC Cyrus II of Persia invades and conquers Babylon and Phoenicia.
Darius commissions the completetion of the canal joining the Nile to the Red Sea began by Necho II 610 BC.
Phillip II of Macedonia decisively beats a comnbined force of Athenians and Thebens at the Battle of Chaironeia.
members.ozemail.com.au /~ancientpersia/timeline.html   (1956 words)

  
 Darius
Darius II played a part in the defeat of Athens in the Peloponnesian War by aiding Sparta both openly and secretly.
Darius III is the one who was defeated and conquered by Alexander the Great.
The third and last Darius had his empire taken away from him even though he had more men, more food, and more experience.
www.socialstudiesforkids.com /wwww/world/dariusdef.htm   (127 words)

  
 The Persian king Darius I in the books of Daniel and Zechariah.
Consequently Darius in Daniel 6 was one of the great kings ruling the whole Persian kingdom as well.
Which means at the first year of the reign of Darius I the exile was 583 - 521 = 62 years old.
Zechariah 7:1 mentions that at the 4th year of the reign of Darius 70 years had bygone after at the 18th year of his reign Nebuchadnezzar destroyed the Jerusalem Temple (Jeremiah 52:29).
home.wanadoo.nl /erick/bible/persiankings/darius1.htm   (421 words)

  
 Great King of Persia Artakshassa I Artaxerxes
The three kings that followed Xerxes on the throne--Artaxerxes I (465-425 BC), Xerxes II (425-424 BC), and Darius II Ochus (423-404 BC)--were all comparatively weak individuals and kings, and such successes as the empire enjoyed during their reigns were mainly the result of the efforts of subordinates or of the troubles faced by their adversaries.
The main events of his long rule were the war with Sparta that ended with a peace favourable to the Persians; the revolt and loss to the empire of Egypt; the rebellion of Cyrus the Younger, brother of the king; and the uprising known as the revolt of the satraps.
Darius was able to put down yet another rebellion in Egypt under Khababash in 337-336 BC, but the beginning of the end came soon afterward, in May 334, with the loss of the Battle of Granicus to Alexander the Great.
worldroots.com /cgi-bin/gasteldb?@I23103@   (1592 words)

  
 Persian Empire
Darius I came to throne in 522BC and became the king of an Empire that was greater than any other before him, or after.
Another of Darius' achievements was the network of roads and canals he built to aid both military and trade.
Darius was defeated at the Battle of Marathon and died 4 years later.
members.aol.com /robinsash/persia/persia.htm   (1458 words)

  
 The Persians
Territorial conquests, like monarchical power, were justified on religious grounds, but these religious grounds never gave rise to the notion that one's religious duty was to conquer the whole of the world as you knew it.
   Darius extended the Persian empire to its farthest reaches, extending through his conquests all the way into Macedon just northeast of Greece.
he entered Babylon after Darius II had fled (eventually to be assassinated) and the infinitely long history of Mesopotamia folded into a new history, that of the Hellenistic period and the Greek and later Roman domination of the land between the Tigris and the Euphrates.
www.wsu.edu:8080 /~dee/MESO/PERSIANS.HTM   (1421 words)

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