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Topic: Daucus


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  Daucus carota   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
Daucus carota is a monocarpic perennial herb and a member of the parsley family (Umbelliferae, Fernald 1951; Ammiaceae, Rydberg 1971).
Daucus carota is not usually a high-priority for management, but it can be persistent or require active management on heavy soils with a good clay content.
Daucus carota can be controlled along paths or in small patches by hand-pulling or mowing in mid-to-late summer before seed set.
tncweeds.ucdavis.edu /esadocs/documnts/dauccar.html   (1108 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
Daucus carota is an adaptable species that is able to grow in poor soil, but is most successful in loose, fertile, and well drained sites such as the tall grass prairies of Illinois.
Daucus carota is host to numerous insect pollinators such as flies (Drosophilidae), ants (Formicidae), beetles (Coleoptera), and bees (Apidae) (Wilkinson et al.
Given that Daucus carota has a relatively long, flowering period and an abundance of nectar and pollen on its mature inflorescences, all of these insect families are successful plant pollinators for Daucus carota (Elliott et al.
www.neiu.edu /~jkasmer/Biol386/Proposals/prop0107.htm   (1588 words)

  
 Comprehensive Report Species - Daucus carota   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
Stewardship Overview: Daucus carota is not usually a high-priority for management, but it can be persistent or require active management on heavy soils with a good clay content.
Daucus carota is more persistent on the heavier soils of southeastern Wisconsin.
Daucus carota is protandrous; on an individual flower, the gynoecium (egg) is still immature when the pollen is released.
natureserve.org /explorer/servlet/NatureServe?searchName=Daucus+carota   (1963 words)

  
 Plant Profile for Daucus carota (Queen Anne's lace)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
Daucus carota L. View 87 genera in Apiaceae, 2 species in Daucus or click below on a thumbnail map or name for subspecies profiles.
Daucus carota L. This plant is listed by the U. federal government or a state.
Daucus carota L. This plant is introduced to the United States from another country or countries.
plants.usda.gov /cgi_bin/plant_profile.cgi?symbol=DACA6   (517 words)

  
 Digital Flora of Texas Vascular Plant Image Library query results: Daucus carota   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
Apiaceae: Daucus carota from Carl Lindman's Bilder ur Nordens Flora
Apiaceae: Daucus carota - Cultivated, from Univ. Wash.
Apiaceae: Daucus carota from Otto Wilhelm Thomé's - Flora von Deutschland Österreich und der Schweiz (1885 - 1905)
www.csdl.tamu.edu /FLORA/cgi/gallery_query?q=Daucus+carota   (223 words)

  
 The Wild Carrot - Queen Annes Lace
(Daucus Carota) or Queen Annes Lace is one of many umbelliferous plants to be found growing around the world.
Although the species name for this ferny plant with the elegant, white lacy flowers is "Daucus carota", the same one used for cultivated carrots it is not the same plant.
The use of any part of this publication reproduced, transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, or stored in a retrieval system, without the prior written consent of Carla Allen is strictly forbidden.
website.lineone.net /~stolarczyk/queen.html   (3191 words)

  
 Daucus carota
Daucus has been reported to contain acetone, asarone, choline, ethanol, formic acid, HCN, isobutyric acid, limonene, malic acid, maltose, oxalic acid, palmitic acid, pyrrolidine, and quinic acid.
Reviewing research on myristicin, which occurs in nutmeg, mace, fl pepper, carrot seed, celery seed, and parsley, Buchanan (J. Food Safety 1: 275, 1979) noted that the psychoactive and hallucinogenic properties of mace, nutmeg, and purified myristicin have been studied.
Most cvs have been derived from Daucus carota subsp.
www.hort.purdue.edu /newcrop/duke_energy/Daucus_carota.html   (2051 words)

  
 History of the Carrot - ad 200 to date   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
It was Galen (second century A.D.) who added the name Daucus to distinguish the Carrot from the Parsnip, calling it Daucus Pastinaca, and Daucus came to be the official name in the sixteenth century, and was adopted by Linnaeus in the eighteenth century.
As vegetables were at that time rather scarce in England, the Carrot's delicious root was warmly welcomed and became a general favourite, its cultivation spreading over the country.
Theophrastus, the father of botany used binomials even in the 4th century B.C., but it was Linnaeus who systematized them and made them into a workable code of nomenclature, distinguishing for the first time between species and varieties, and making the species the unit of classification.
website.lineone.net /~stolarczyk/history2.html   (3679 words)

  
 Digital Flora of Texas Vascular Plant Image Library query results: Daucus pusillus   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
Apiaceae: Daucus pusillus (zoom) - Inflorescence from side; Dewberry Ridge outcrop, Grimes County, Texas - photo: Hugh Wilson
Apiaceae: Daucus pusillus - Introduced Specimen scan: TAMU 11199.
Apiaceae: Daucus pusillus - Introduced, from Montgomery Co., TX.
www.csdl.tamu.edu /FLORA/cgi/gallery_query?q=Daucus+pusillus   (141 words)

  
 Carrot - Daucus carota - Encapsulated Botanical - Herbs   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
The Carrot was well known to the ancients, and is mentioned by Greek and Latin writers under various names.
The name "Carrot" is Celtic meaning "red of color", and Daucus is from the Greek "dais" meaning "to burn", signifying its pungent and stimulating qualities.
The name Carota for the garden Carrot is found first in the writings of Athenaeus in 200 A.D., and in a book on cookery by Apicius Czclius in 230 A.D. It was Galen, ~350 A.D., who added the name Daucus to distinguish the Carrot from the Parsnip.
www.viableherbalsolutions.com /singles/herbs/s820.htm   (1393 words)

  
 daucus carota, herb bulk medicinal   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
Carrot / Daucus carota > Supplement Index > Carrot / Daucus carota >...
Quantity: Carrot Diced 1 lb (Daucus carota) $8.30...
Carrot - Daucus carota - Encapsulated Botanical - Herbs
www.amazingherbalguide.com /52/daucus-carota,-herb-bulk-medicinal.html   (195 words)

  
 botanical.com - A Modern Herbal | Carrot - Herb Profile and Information
In speaking of the medical virtue of the first species (which is evidently the Carrot, the second variety presumably the Parsnip), he adds, 'the cultivated has the same as the wild kind, though the latter is more powerful, especially when growing in stony places.'
pastinaca, and Daucus came to be the official name in the sixteenth century, and was adopted by Linnaeus in the eighteenth century.
From the time of Dioscorides and Pliny to the present day, the Carrot has been in constant use by all nations.
www.botanical.com /botanical/mgmh/c/carrot24.html   (2732 words)

  
 Wild Carrot (daucus carota)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
Found a lot near the coast and in wasteland.
Daucus comes from the Greek "dais", to burn, referring to its pungency and stimulating properties.
The name Bird's Nest comes from the plants resemblance to one when the seeds have ripened - the umbels then contract so that the head forms a hollow cup.
www.englishplants.co.uk /wildcarrot.html   (490 words)

  
 AllRefer.com - Queen Anne's lace, Plant (Plants) - Encyclopedia
You are here : AllRefer.com > Reference > Encyclopedia > Plants > Queen Anne's lace
Queen Anne's lace or wild carrot, herb (Daucus carota) of the family Umbelliferae (carrot family), native to the Old World but naturalized and often weedy throughout North America.
Similar in appearance to the cultivated carrot (which is believed to have been derived from this plant), it has feathery foliage but a woody root.
reference.allrefer.com /encyclopedia/Q/QuAnnlace.html   (222 words)

  
 Healing plants for traditional herbal remedies proven effective by wise herbal healers for generations
It is very helpful for diaper rash and cradle cap and soothes nipples that are sore from breastfeeding.
Carrot oil (Daucus carota): Carrot oil is an abundant source of vitamin A like carotenoids that have been shown to enhance the health of the skin and repair skin damage.
Retin-A, the prescription drug used to treat severe acne, is a carotenoid preparation.
www.herbwiseproducts.com /herbology2.html   (2141 words)

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