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Topic: David Lewis (philosopher)


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  David Lewis (philosopher) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
David Kellogg Lewis (September 28, 1941 – October 14, 2001) is considered to have been one of the leading analytic philosophers of the latter half of the 20th century.
Lewis was born in Oberlin, Ohio, to a Professor of Government at Oberlin College and a distinguished medieval historian.
Lewis suffered from severe diabetes for much of his life, which eventually grew worse and led into kidney failure.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/David_Lewis_(philosopher)   (459 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: David Lewis (philosopher)
Gilbert Ryle Gilbert Ryle (1900–1976), was a philosopher, and a representative of the generation of British ordinary language philosophers influenced by Wittgensteins insights into language, and is principally known for his critique of Cartesian dualism, for which he coined the phrase the ghost in the machine.
Lewis was astoundingly modest and unpompous for a successful philosopher, always ready to respond to criticism, and unfailingly generous to students.
Lewis' philosophical interests were broad, as evidenced by the contents of the five volumes of his collected papers published so far: ethics, politics, metaphysics, epistemology, philosophical logic, language -- he wrote on a vast range of subjects, from holes to worlds, from Anselm to Mill, from the mind to time travel.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/David-Lewis-%28philosopher%29   (1578 words)

  
 David Lewis - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
David Lewis (philosopher) (1941-2001), an American-born philosopher famous for his theory of modal realism and his love for Australia.
Saint David Lewis, one of the Catholic Forty Martyrs of England and Wales
David Robert Lewis (writer and artist), a South African instrumental in the country's alternative counter-culture and the transition to democracy.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/David_Lewis   (154 words)

  
 Baruch Spinoza
Unlike previous philosophers, Lewis was not content to explicate possibility and necessity in terms of mere concepts.
Lewis noted that the problem of chance could short-circuit the thesis, but was unable to complete his solution to the problem.
Lewis' works were skillfully written and often included humorous content (his famous article on mad pain and Martian pain included a Martian who reacted to injury by inflating bladders in his feet) as well as references to science fiction (he lists Larry Niven among the works cited in On the Plurality of Worlds).
www.philosophers.co.uk /cafe/phil_mar2002.htm   (782 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: David Lewis
David K. Lewis David Kellogg Lewis (September 28, 1941 –; October 14, 2001) is considered to have been one of the leading analytic philosophers of the latter half of the 20th century.
David Lewis, CC, MA (June 23, 1909-May 23, 1981) was a Russian-born Canadian labour lawyer and politician.
David (Dave) Lewis (Born: July 3, 1953 in Kindersley, Saskatchewan, Canada-) is a Canadian former defenceman and former head coach in the National Hockey League.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/David_Lewis   (509 words)

  
 Princeton - News - Princeton Professor David Lewis dies at 60   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Princeton, N.J. -- David Lewis, the Class of 1943 University Professor of Philosophy at Princeton University and a leading figure in philosophy, died suddenly Oct. 14 from complications arising from diabetes.
Lewis joined the Princeton faculty as an associate professor in 1970 and remained at Princeton for the rest of his life.
Lewis was also known for his fascination with trains, his love for Australia, Australian philosophy and Australian Rules football, and his profound lack of interest in learning to use a modern computer.
www.princeton.edu /pr/news/01/q4/1019-lewis.htm   (837 words)

  
 Possible world - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The modern philosophical use of the notion was pioneered by Saul Kripke.
From this groundwork, the theory of possible worlds became a central part of many philosophical developments, from the 1960s onwards – including, most famously, the analysis of counterfactual conditionals in terms of "nearby possible worlds" developed by David Lewis and Robert Stalnaker.
Lewis argued that what we range over are nothing more nor less than real, concrete worlds that exist just as unequivocally as our actual world exists, but which are distinguished from the actual world simply by standing in no spatial, temporal, or causal relations with the actual world.
www.wikipedia.org /wiki/Possible_world   (1215 words)

  
 Philosophy professor David Lewis dies   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
David Lewis, the Class of 1943 University Professor of Philosophy who was a leading figure in his field, died suddenly Oct. 14 from complications due to diabetes.
Lewis received honorary degrees from the University of Cambridge, the University of York and the University of Melbourne.
Lewis was a leading figure in the revival of systematic metaphysics as a serious discipline, one of the most remarkable trends in 20th-century philosophy.
www.daf-drustvo.si /Lewis.htm   (1963 words)

  
 EducationGuardian.co.uk | Humanities | Obituary: David Lewis
Lewis is most celebrated for his "modal realism", a theory which argues that possible worlds are not just a concept for explaining possibility and necessity, but as real as our own universe.
For what possible worlds actually are (and virtually no one, perhaps not even Lewis, accepted their reality) does not affect the brilliant, sophisticated way he used them, analysing problematic notions in causation, universals, the content of thought, properties, probability, and the nature of propositions.
But he could be unflamboyantly funny, especially in print, and his philosophical examples are witty without facetiousness or self-congratulation (a famous article contrasted a Martian whose response to painful stimuli is the inflation of cavities in his feet with a madman whose reaction is indifference).
education.guardian.co.uk /higher/humanities/story/0,9850,579261,00.html   (1340 words)

  
 Magic Propaganda Mill | News Propaganda   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
David Kellogg Lewis, a metaphysician and a philosopher of mind, language and logic at Princeton University, died on Sunday at his home in Princeton, N.J. He was 60.
Lewis was also considered by some philosophers a Meinongian, a follower of Alexius Meinong, who believed that there were things that had being but not existence.
Lewis, who loved Australia, also got an honorary degree from the University of Melbourne and was an honorary fellow of the Australian Academy of the Humanities.
www.magicpropagandamill.com /news/features/lewis.html   (564 words)

  
 David Lewis (philosopher)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Born in the United States of America but most closely associated with Australia, he is most famous for his theory of modal realism but also made ground-breaking contributions in philosophy of language, philosophy of mind, general metaphysics, epistemology, and philosophical logic.
Lewis went on to study at Harvard, where he studied with W.
Lewis suffered from severe diabetes for most of his life, which toward the end of his eventually grew worse and led into kidney failure.
www.sciencedaily.com /encyclopedia/david_lewis__philosopher_   (386 words)

  
 David Lewis: Modal Realism
Lewis [1986], p.70); that is, they are parts of the same world.
Lewis himself certainly claims to take it absolutely seriously; not only does he insist, in the quotation with which we began this section, that he wants his claims to be taken literally he also often writes of possible worlds as if he takes their real existence literally;
Lewis appears to be admitting something like this: `It is possible that modal realism is wrong, and that another theory, offering the same benefits but entailing the existence of only one world (this one), is correct'.
www.uwichill.edu.bb /bnccde/ph39c/modal.realism.html   (2488 words)

  
 The Daily Princetonian - Respected professor David Lewis taught philosophy with passion
Lewis, a professor at Princeton for 30 years, readily shared his admirable breadth of knowledge with those in his field, often traveling outside of the country to meet other philosophers.
While Lewis certainly valued both his academic studies and his hobbies, he also prized his relationships with the special people in his life, including his students, whom he wholeheartedly helped to master their own work.
Lewis, a Princeton resident for three decades, is survived by his wife, Stephanie, brother, Donald, and sister, Ellen.
www.dailyprincetonian.com /archives/2001/10/22/news/3664.shtml   (1061 words)

  
 David Lewis   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
DAVID LEWIS was one of the most original and brilliant...
David Lewis was born in Oberlin, Ohio, in 1941.
David Kellogg Lewis, philosopher: born Oberlin, Ohio 28 September...
hallencyclopedia.com /David_Lewis   (372 words)

  
 Saints of August 27   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Born at Abergavenny, Monmouthshire, Wales, in 1616; died at Usk, August 27, 1679; beatified in 1929; canonized in 1970 by Pope Paul VI as one of the Forty Martyrs of England and Wales.
David was the son of a Protestant school teacher and a Catholic mother.
In 1648, David was sent to Wales, where he used the alias Charles Baker and a farmhouse at Cwm (Monnow Valley) in southern Wales as his headquarters for the next 31 years.
www.saintpatrickdc.org /ss/0827.htm   (2964 words)

  
 Community Control or Statist Politics: A Reply to David Lewis
Lewis seems to think that councillors, elected on a local basis in a libertarian municipalist campaign, would function no differently from representatives who are elected to provincial and national legislative bodies.
Lewis accuses me of wanting to "forever stamp out the spirituality that was central to all pre-hierarchical culture." We then learn that by disagreeing with his presumably well-informed version of native American spirituality, I am complicitous in (to use his garish language) the "Native culture euthanasia program" (read: the destruction of native cultures).
Lewis seems to think that I favor the limitless production of frivolous commodities and a senseless vision of life that does not extend beyond the confines of a shopping mall, that I demand that the biosphere be torn up so that those who are now poor can have all the middle-class comforts of suburban life.
dwardmac.pitzer.edu /Anarchist_Archives/bookchin/communitycontrol.html   (4606 words)

  
 Remarks at the Memorial Service for David Lewis   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
David started his career looking for all the world like an empiricist in the tradition of Hume and Carnap; by the end of his career, it was clear that he was the great rationalist of twentieth century philosophy.
David was the sort of empiricist who starts at the surface, but allows carefully constrained steps beyond it in the search for explanation.
David did so much philosophy this way that I hope one day someone publishes a collection of his correspondence: maybe some of it could be set in that same typeface, which is the way I always imagine David's philosophical work.
consc.net /lewis.html   (1036 words)

  
 Modal realism - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
It is based on the following notions: that possible worlds exist; possible worlds are not different in kind to the actual world; possible worlds are irreducible entities; the term 'actual' in 'actual world' is indexical.
However, some cosmological theories may provide scientific support for Lewis' view in the form of several multiverse hypotheses.
Lewis himself not only claims to take modal realism seriously (although he did regret his choice of the expression modal realism), he also insists that his claims should be taken literally:
www.wikipedia.org /wiki/Modal_realism   (962 words)

  
 [No title]
David went on to major in philosophy and the rest is history.
Susan Anderson, who was David's student: I was very close to both David and Steffi while I was a graduate student at UCLA and he was just beginning his teaching career there.
David was kind, hospitable, and humorous, in addition to being such a brilliant philosopher.
vm.uconn.edu /~wwwphil/lewis.html   (857 words)

  
 Crooked Timber » » David Lewis
Lewis’ philosophical interests were broad, as evidenced by the contents of the five volumes of his collected papers published so far: ethics, politics, metaphysics, epistemology, philosophical logic, language – he wrote on a vast range of subjects, from holes to worlds, from Anselm to Mill, from the mind to time travel.
He was the ideal, the model philosopher; he’s also (and this is a very different matter) widely regarded as being the best philosopher of his generation – perhaps of the twentieth century.
Quine was born in 1910 and was David’s adviser.
www.crookedtimber.org /archives/002971.html   (1770 words)

  
 [No title]
DAVID LEWIS was one of the most original and brilliant thinkers in contemporary philosophy.
He was a systematic philosopher in a traditional sense, who created a system of thought (or metaphysical system) which attempts to reconcile the insights of modern science with pervasive elements of common-sense belief.
Lewis was born in Oberlin, Ohio, on Sept. 28, 1941.
www.swarthmore.edu /news/inthenews/01/01.10.25.html   (3194 words)

  
 Philosopher’s portrait a gift to the University : UniNews : News : The University of Melbourne   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Ms Brennan, who knew David Lewis during her days as a student in the Department of Philosophy, painted the portrait of him in 1991 when she was Artist-in-Residence at Ormond College.
Friends and colleagues of David Lewis were among those who gathered in the Gibson Memorial Library recently to express appreciation to Angela Brennan for her gift.
Professor Lewis was awarded an Honorary Degree in Literature from the University of Melbourne in 1995 and was an honorary Fellow of the Australian Academy of the Humanities.
uninews.unimelb.edu.au /articleid_1471.html   (410 words)

  
 David Lewis On The Internet   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Full text of the article, 'David Hume, David Lewis, and decision theory' from Mind, a publication in the field of Reference and Education, is provided free of...
David Lewis (1941-2001) is considered by many to have been the leading Analytic philosopher of the...
David Lewis is one of the most important recent analytical philosophers.
www.david-lewis.org /links.php   (634 words)

  
 Composition as Identity
In contrast, David Lewis (see below) tries to solve the problem by attributing to composition a broader, non-traditional sense of identity that allows for one-many identity, and of which one-one numerical identity is a special case (that does not hold in composition).
The late David Lewis is considered by some to be the leading analytic philosopher of the late 20th century; he is also known for his modal realism, which is famous for being both crazy and philosophically fruitful.
Merricks, a philosopher at the University of Virginia, argues that composition as identity entails mereological essentialism.
www.people.virginia.edu /~cjs4f/composition.html   (1501 words)

  
 MORTAL COILS by A. David Lewis & Co.   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
David Lewis releases the second issue of his series MORTAL COILS, a Twilight Zone-esque book consisting of two standalone stories where reality is never quite what it seems, and with it Lewis takes a great leap forward.
Lewis isn't the comic book equivalent of Rod Serling just yet, but he's definitely a driven writer and publisher whose talent is growing with leaps and bounds.
Lewis and his colleagues are people I'd like to see continue to work at their craft, because they clearly want to do something different in comics, and that's always welcome to my eyes.
www.georgetown.edu /users/adl6/mortalcoils_reviews.html   (7671 words)

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