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Topic: David Ricardo


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  David Ricardo
David Ricardo's family was descended from Iberian Jews who had fled to Holland during a wave of persecutions in the early 18th Century.
"Ricardo in Parliament", by Edwin Cannan 1894, EJ
Walras's Critique of Ricardo" by Heinz Kurz and Neri Salvadori
cepa.newschool.edu /het/profiles/ricardo.htm   (2223 words)

  
  EH.Net Encyclopedia: David Ricardo
David Ricardo (1772-1823) was one of the greatest theoretical economists of all time.
Ricardo, though, prospered in the financial business to a far greater extent than his father, amassing a fortune of about £700,000 (equivalent to approximately £40 million today).
For Ricardo, rent arises from the advantages that one site has over another due to differing degrees of soil fertility: rent per acre is highest on the most fertile land, and declines to zero on the worst quality soil.
eh.net /encyclopedia/article/stead.ricardo   (474 words)

  
 Ricardo - David
David Ricardo, working in the early part of the 19th century, realised that absolute advantage was a limited case of a more general theory.
What David Ricardo saw was that it could still be mutually beneficial for both countries to specialise and trade.
Ricardo's law of rent was probably his most notable and influential discovery.
iang.org /free_banking/david.html   (944 words)

  
 David Ricardo - Encyclopedia.com
As far as value was concerned, Ricardo stated that the value of almost any good was, essentially, a function of the labor needed to produce it.
Ricardo was also concerned with the subject of international trade, and for that he developed the theory of comparative advantage, still widely accepted among economists.
In a now classic illustration, Ricardo explained how it was advantageous for England to produce cloth and Portugal to produce wine, as long as both countries traded freely with each other, even though Portugal might have produced both wine and cloth at a lower cost than England did.
www.encyclopedia.com /doc/1E1-Ricardo.html   (786 words)

  
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Ricardo’s belief that total output will ultimately stop growing convinced him that the main issue in economics was not to figure out how economies grow richer but to figure out how the limited output in the economy’s stationary state is distributed or shared among the various sectors of the economy.
Ricardo was also aware that even if wheat and rice took the same amount of time to be produced, the LTV would still be in trouble if the fertility of land varied from one place to another.
Ricardo's disagreement with Thomas Malthus on the import tariffs embedded in the Corn Laws—Ricardo was against the tariffs, of course—was rooted in his theory of trade.
www.phoenix.liu.edu /~uroy/eco54/histlist/hist07.htm   (2891 words)

  
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David himself had little formal education (obviously not a modern role model!) and went to work for his father at the age of 14.
David Ricardo was born in London in 1772, one of 17 children.
Ricardo’s business career started when he began working for his father at age 14, but at 21 he married a Quaker, which created a family rift that sent Ricardo into the world completely on his own.
www.lycos.com /info/david-ricardo.html   (499 words)

  
 David Ricardo: Theory of Free International Trade - Economic Insights - FRB Dallas
Ricardo, himself a landowner who was profiting from the rising rents, nevertheless argued that the Corn Laws should not be enacted and, after they were, continued to argue strenuously for their repeal.
It was from Malthus that Ricardo took the argument of an evergrowing population that pressed against all economic expansions, an assumption that lay at the heart of Ricardo’s model.
Ricardo’s theory of rent was tied directly to the marginal productivity of land, his theory of value was tied directly to labor costs, and his theory of distribution stood atop both concepts, with Malthusian economic stagnation as a major assumption.
www.dallasfed.org /research/ei/ei0402.html   (2443 words)

  
 David Ricardo
David Ricardo was born in London in 1772 to a wealthy Jewish family.
Ricardo felt that the growth of capital and population lead to extension of cultivation to less fertile and less accessible land and to decreasing returns on cultivated land upon the application of heavy farming.
Ricardo did all of these things without ever having formal education in the field of economics, rather he learned by doing, and to this day people are effected by his thoughts on modern economics.
www.bu.edu /econ/faculty/kyn/newweb/economic_systems/Theory/Classical/david_ricardo.htm   (2433 words)

  
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David himself had little formal education (obviously not a modern role model!) and went to work for his father at the age of 14.
David Ricardo was born in London in 1772, one of 17 children.
Ricardo’s business career started when he began working for his father at age 14, but at 21 he married a Quaker, which created a family rift that sent Ricardo into the world completely on his own.
espanol.lycos.com /info/david-ricardo.html   (499 words)

  
 AllRefer.com - David Ricardo (Economics, Biography) - Encyclopedia
As far as value was concerned, Ricardo stated that the value of almost any good was, essentially, a function of the labor needed to produce it.
Ricardo was also concerned with the subject of international trade, and for that he developed the theory of comparative advantage, still widely accepted among economists.
In a now classic illustration, Ricardo explained how it was advantageous for England to produce cloth and Portugal to produce wine, as long as both countries traded freely with each other, even though Portugal might have produced both wine and cloth at a lower cost than England did.
reference.allrefer.com /encyclopedia/R/Ricardo.html   (507 words)

  
 David Ricardo: Definition and Links by Encyclopedian.com
...David Ricardo David Ricardo David Ricardo (1772-1823), a British economist,...associated with David Ricardo include: The theory of comparative advantage, which showed that...the economy.
See also: David Ricardo Free-Trade Free Trade Free Trade leading supporters of EISA, an...
David Ricardo (1772-1823), a British economist, was one of the most influential of the classical economists.
www.encyclopedian.com /da/David-Ricardo.html   (283 words)

  
 David Ricardo Biography and Summary
David Ricardo was born in London on April 19, 1772, the...
David Ricardo was one of the most important figures involved in the creation of the classical school of economics in the nineteenth century.
David Ricardo(April 18, 1772 – September 11, 1823), a political economist, is often credited with systematizing economics, and was one of the most influential of the classical economists.
www.bookrags.com /David_Ricardo   (214 words)

  
 Printer Friendly - Economist David Ricardo on Taxes
David Ricardo, born in 1772, became interested in economics at the age of 27 after a chance reading of Adam Smith’s The Wealth of Nations (1776).
Ricardo did not become a full-time professional economist until he was 41--after he had amassed a fortune as a dealer in government securities.
Ricardo agreed that taxes on rents from unimproved land provided the one exception to the principle that “broader is better.” However, he summarily rejected taxes levied disproportionately on landowners because he believed such taxes violate Smith’s equity maxim.
www.heartland.org /PrinterFriendly.cfm?theType=artId&theID=14347   (893 words)

  
 David Ricardo's Contributions to Economics   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
David Ricardo maintained that the economy generally moves towards a standstill.
It is ironic that although Ricardo's ideas helped provide a basis for Marxist critiques of the capitalist system, he own policiy recommendations, like those of Robert Malthus, are grounded in the doctrine of free trade.
Ricardo believed that the Corn Laws, in particular, constituted a burden to the agricultural economy.
www.victorianweb.org /economics/ric.html   (534 words)

  
 David Ricardo
David Ricardo (1772-1823), a British economist, was one of the most influential of the classical economists.
He was also a successful businessman, financier and speculator, and amassed a considerable fortune.
An analysis of the nature of land rent.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/da/David_Ricardo.html   (113 words)

  
  David Ricardo (1772-1823)
Despite this, and the popularity of Malthus' theory of population, Ricardo subsequently became the foremost spokesman on economics in the late 18th, early 19th centuries.
Ricardo believed that the interestd of the capitalists are coincident with the interests of society, whereas the interests of the landlords are contrary to the interests of society.
Ricardo was pessimistic about the future, but believed that society could be ameliorated in the short run.
people.westminstercollege.edu /faculty/jwatkins/105/105-RIC.htm   (413 words)

  
 David Ricardo's Contributions to Economics   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
David Ricardo maintained that the economy generally moves towards a standstill.
It is ironic that although Ricardo's ideas helped provide a basis for Marxist critiques of the capitalist system, he own policiy recommendations, like those of Robert Malthus, are grounded in the doctrine of free trade.
Ricardo believed that the Corn Laws, in particular, constituted a burden to the agricultural economy.
www.scholars.nus.edu.sg /victorian/economics/ric.html   (534 words)

  
 Amazon.ca: Principles Of Political Economy Taxation: Books: David Ricardo   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
David Ricardo became a stockbroker at the age of 21 and slowly became a recognized economic scholar in England.
Along with Adam Smith, the Englishman David Ricardo is one of the fathers of the so-called Classics school of economic thought, and the Principles is his major opus, one he was very much reluctant to write, but only did so at the urgings of James Mill and his son John.
The concepts adapted and created by David Ricardo is transported to the text in a dry and concise style, not too much worried in polemics, but only interested in address the topics he raises in a very precise way.
www.amazon.ca /Principles-Political-Economy-Taxation-Ricardo/dp/1573921092   (1264 words)

  
 David Ricardo
Ricardo even passed on investment tips to Malthus - the most famous case being when Ricardo urged Malthus to invest in the bond market in anticipation of a British victory at Waterloo.
Ricardo understood that if he then assumed that the rates of profit across different industries were equalized (as free competition would imply), then, mathematically, relative prices would now vary with wages - exactly what he had criticized Adam Smith for.
Notice that the differences in initial position mean that the labor theory of value is not assumed to hold across countries - as it should be, Ricardo argued, because factors, particularly labor, are not mobile across borders.
www.economyprofessor.com /theorists/davidricardo.php   (2028 words)

  
 David Ricardo, Biography: The Concise Encyclopedia of Economics: Library of Economics and Liberty
David Ricardo was one of those rare people who achieved tremendous success and lasting fame.
Ricardo first gained notice among economists over the "bullion controversy." In 1809 he wrote that England's inflation was the result of the Bank of England's propensity to issue excess bank notes.
Writing a century before Paul Samuelson and other modern economists popularized the use of equations, Ricardo is still esteemed for his uncanny ability to arrive at complex conclusions without any of the mathematical tools now deemed essential.
www.econlib.org /LIBRARY/Enc/bios/Ricardo.html   (1068 words)

  
 The Theories of David Ricardo
Ricardo developed two key theories, that are still important in economics courses today.
Ricardo's theory on international trade focused on comparative costs and looked at how a country could gain from trade when it had relatively lower costs (i.e.
Ricardo showed that if one country produced a good at a lower opportunity cost than another country, then it should specialise in that good.
faculty.insead.edu /fatas/ime/Virtual/library/economists/ricardoth.htm   (286 words)

  
 David Ricardo - Search Results - MSN Encarta
David Ricardo - Search Results - MSN Encarta
Ricardo, David (1772-1823), British economist, born in London.
As a coherent economic theory, classical economics starts with Smith, continues with the British economists Thomas Robert Malthus and David Ricardo,...
encarta.msn.com /David_Ricardo.html   (118 words)

  
 Glossary of People: Ri
Ricardo was the third son of a Dutch Jew who had made a fortune on the London Stock Exchange.
At this time Ricardo became friends withs the philosopher and economist James Mill (father of John Stuart Mill), the Utilitarian philosopher Jeremy Bentham and Thomas Malthus, best known for his theory that population tends to increase faster than the food supply.
This provoked a popular outcry and caused Ricardo to publish his Essay on the Influence of a Low Price of Corn on the Profits of Stock (1815), in which he argued that raising the tariff on grain imports tended to increase the rents of the country gentlemen while decreasing the profits of manufacturers.
www.marxists.org /glossary/people/r/i.htm   (652 words)

  
 Korte biografie David Ricardo
David Ricardo werd in 1772 in Londen geboren.
Hoewel David een nuchtere zakenman was, had hij zeer grote
In 1819 trad hij toe tot het Lagerhuis en in 1823 is hij op zijn land
www.xs4all.nl /~mkalk/ricardo.htm   (188 words)

  
 David Ricardo, Biography: The Concise Encyclopedia of Economics: Library of Economics and Liberty
In short, Ricardo was an early believer in the quantity theory of money, or what is known today as monetarism.
One of Ricardo's chief contributions, arrived at without mathematical tools, is his theory of rents.
Picture of David Ricardo courtesy of The Warren J. Samuels Portrait Collection at Duke University.
www.econlib.org /library/Enc/bios/Ricardo.html   (1068 words)

  
 Ricardo,David Books - Signed, used, new, out-of-print
David Ricardo (1772-1823), the founder of the classical school of economics, applied the deductive logic of the philosopher James Mill to the analysis of monetary principles.
The five pamphlets are writings of great importance, because both of the subjects with which they deal and of the principles laid down in their treatment of those subjects."...I feel that the trend of economic thought and the new importance...
David Ricardo [1772-1823] has been called."the principle founder of what has been called the classical school of political economy" (Dictionary of National Biography) and "first 'scientific' economist" (Printing and the Mind of Man 277).
www.alibris.com /search/books/author/Ricardo,David   (643 words)

  
 Economics of Adam Smith and David Ricardo
David Ricardo was born in 1772 England to a Jewish banker.
David Ricardo’s wealth is a perfect example of the success of Free Trade.
But, Ricardo insists that the skipper and Gilligan should work together so as to amass a greater collection of wealth, and therefore prosper.
www.hyperhistory.net /apwh/essays/comp/cw29econricardosmith.htm   (1084 words)

  
 David Ricardo (1722 – 1823)
David Ricardo was one of the most important figures in the development of economic theory.
Ricardo though is remembered foremost as an economist rather than a stockbroker.
Ricardo explained that as more land was cultivated, farmers would have to start using less productive land.
www.tutor2u.net /newsmanager/templates/?a=722&z=58   (721 words)

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