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Topic: Davy Crockett (nuclear device)


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In the News (Tue 23 Jul 19)

  
  Are Suitcase Bombs Possible?
It is impossible to verify at the time of this writing whether nuclear devices sized to fit in side a suitcase were actually manufactured by the former Soviet Union, as alleged by Alexander Lebed in September 1997.
W-54 Davy Crockett (38 K) The W-54 design probably approaches the minimum size for a spherical implosion device (the US has conducted tests of a 25.4 cm implosion systems however).
Minimizing nuclear weapon diameters has been a subject of intense interest for developing nuclear artillery shells, since the largest field artillery is typically the 208 mm (8.2 inch) caliber, with 155 mm (6.1 inches) artillery being the workhorse.
nuclearweaponarchive.org /News/DoSuitcaseNukesExist.html   (1660 words)

  
 CalendarHome.com - Davy Crockett - Calendar Encyclopedia
Crockett was elected lieutenant colonel of the Fifty-seventh Regiment of Tennessee Militia on March 27, 1818.
On September 17, 1821, Crockett was elected to the Committee of Propositions and Grievances.
Davy Crockett became a popular figure in Egypt between the late 1980s and early '90s, when airing of the classic Disney series led to a brief Davy Crockett craze among Egyptian viewers (mostly children), which also led the airing of the 1988 revival a few years later.
encyclopedia.calendarhome.com /cgi-bin/encyclopedia.pl?p=Davy_Crockett   (3218 words)

  
  Davy Crockett
David Crockett (born August 17, 1786, died March 6, 1836) was an American folk-hero usually referred to now as "Davy Crockett." He was born in Greene County, Tennessee, and was not well educated.
Evidence has come to light since 1955 that makes it likely Crockett was one of the half dozen or so men taken prisoner after that battle and summarily executed by General (later President of Mexico) Antonio de Santa Anna.
Davy Crockett was also the name given to a small neutron bomb that was deployed by the U.S. during the Cold War.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/da/Davy_Crockett.html   (230 words)

  
 Nuclear Destruction - A brief history of cold war nuclear developments, The proliferation
The advent of nuclear weapons fundamentally altered both the nature of war and the relationship of the military with the rest of society.
In one 1945 incident at the 560-square-mile Hanford nuclear reservation in Washington State, over a ton of radioactive material of roughly 350,000 to 400,000 curies (one curie being the amount of radiation emitted in a second by 1,400 pounds of enriched uranium) was released into the air.
Nuclear anxieties have migrated from all-out war among superpowers to fears of nuclear accidents and atomic attacks by rogue nations.
www.deathreference.com /Me-Nu/Nuclear-Destruction.html   (4098 words)

  
 Science Fair Projects - Nuclear weapon
Nuclear weapons have been employed only twice in warfare- first on the morning of August 6, 1945, when the United States dropped a uranium gun-type device entitled Little Boy on the Japanese city of Hiroshima, and three days later a plutonium implosion-type device named Fat Man on the city of Nagasaki during World War II.
Nuclear weapons are often described as either fission or fusion devices based on the dominant source of the weapon's energy.
Nuclear weapons are relatively inefficient in their use of fissionable material, and much of the uranium and plutonium is dispersed by the explosion without undergoing fission.
www.all-science-fair-projects.com /science_fair_projects_encyclopedia/Hydrogen_bomb   (5688 words)

  
 Davy Crockett (nuclear device) at AllExperts
Davy Crockett mounted to a recoilless rifle on a tripod
The M-388 Davy Crockett was a tactical nuclear recoilless rifle projectile that was deployed by the United States during the Cold War.
One of the smallest nuclear weapons ever fielded, the Davy Crockett was developed in the late 1950s for use against Soviet troops in West Germany.
en.allexperts.com /e/d/da/davy_crockett_(nuclear_device).htm   (631 words)

  
 Nuclear Terrorism - FAQs
Nuclear material with much lower concentrations can be used in nuclear weapons, however -- and is sometimes referred to as "weapons-usable." At uranium concentrations less than 20 percent, producing an explosive chain reaction is almost impossible.
States forgo nuclear weapons for a number of reasons: inadequate national resources, technological constraints, the international nuclear taboo, international treaties, domestic politics, international inducements, security assurances, aid, threats of sanctions and coercion, and the limited strategic utility of nuclear weapons.
Moscow's assurance that "all nuclear weapons are in place" is wishful thinking since at least four nuclear submarines with nuclear warheads sank and were never recovered by the Soviet Union.
www.nuclearterror.org /faq.html   (2582 words)

  
 The Ultimate Davy Crockett - American History Information Guide and Reference
David Crockett (August 17, 1786 – March 6, 1836) was an American folk-hero usually referred to now as Davy Crockett.
Crockett was born in Greene County, Tennessee, and was not well educated.
Evidence has come to light since 1955 that makes it likely Crockett was one of the half dozen or so men taken prisoner after that battle and summarily executed by General (later President of Mexico) Antonio López de Santa Anna.
www.historymania.com /american_history/Davy_Crockett   (300 words)

  
 Nuclear weapons Encyclopedia
The simplest form of nuclear weapon would be a gun-type fission weapon, where a sub-critical mass of fissile material (such as uranium-235) would be shot at another sub-critical mass of fissile material.
The device was a prototype design and not a deliverable weapon: standing over 20 ft (6 m) high and weighing at least 140,000 lb (64 t) (its refrigeration equipment added an additional 24,000 lb as well), it could not have been dropped from even the largest planes.
Israel is widely believed to possess an arsenal of potentially up to several hundred nuclear warheads, but this has never been officially confirmed or denied (though the existence of their Dimona nuclear facility was more or less confirmed by the leaks of the dissident Mordechai Vanunu in 1986).
www.hallencyclopedia.com /topic/Nuclear_weapons.html   (10182 words)

  
 MICRO NUKES IN LONDON
At first glance the thought of micronized nuclear weapons being used in major cities seems absurd, but there is now considerable evidence indicating strongly that small nuclear devices were also responsible for the two massive London blasts.
Radiation left behind by nuclear devices, even micronized nuclear devices, can be extremely dangerous for those forced to work in the area after the bomb has exploded: Probably a very good reason for the American and British Governments to blame Islamic Militants and the IRA respectively.
If either government "went public" with the news that nuclear devices had been detonated, there might be widespread panic in two of the most important business districts in the world, perhaps leading to a complete refusal to return to work.
homepage.ntlworld.com /steveseymour/nuke/nukes1.htm   (1891 words)

  
 Davy Crockett - Search Results - MSN Encarta
Davy Crockett - Search Results - MSN Encarta
Crockett, Davy (1786-1836), American frontier hero and political leader whose death at The Alamo made him a national hero.
David Crockett, a legend in his time and since, was born in 1786 in East Tennessee.
encarta.msn.com /Davy_Crockett.html   (150 words)

  
 Tom Bissell Extended Asides on Nuclear Weapons Old Town Review
Nuclear weapons are the single most destructive force on the planet - they are the yardstick by which we measure all other forms of destruction.
To create the necessary chain reaction, the core of nuclear material must be formed into a critical mass, meaning that enough fissionable material is packed into a sufficiently small area to enable a self-sustaining number of fissions to take place.
Modern nuclear devices are largely “boosted” weapons because, back in the fifties and sixties, it was decided that the most destructive man-made force the world has ever known could stand some fucking improvement.
www.fluxfactory.org /otr/bissellnukes.htm   (3089 words)

  
 Damn Interesting » Davy Crockett: King of the Atomic Frontier
The Davy Crockett was also designed to detach from its vehicle, allowing the teams to relocate on foot and dispatch their miniature mutually-assured-destruction from a handy tripod mount.
Even with the help of the spotter gun and rifled barrel, both of the Davy Crockett launcher designs were somewhat sloppy in their accuracy, so the detonation was likely to be several hundred feet from the target.
Davy Crockett is a catchy name (and tune), little feller adds a warm weapon loving aspect, but as I took in the photos and article detail, I had visions of a grand Armed Forces Day vendor booth, brightly proclaiming "Armageddon on -a- stick"
www.damninteresting.com /?p=783   (5608 words)

  
 4.2 Fission Weapon Designs
The basic requirement for a ground penetrator weapon is to have a nuclear device inside a long, narrow, strong casing that is massive and strong enough to punch through concrete, rocks, and soil.
The nuclear device must also be rugged enough not to be damaged by the shock of impact.
As noted earlier in the discussion on nuclear testing, manufacturing a device that is close to critical is extremely hazardous and itself requires substantial sophistication.
nuclearweaponarchive.org /Nwfaq/Nfaq4-2.html   (7444 words)

  
 Weapons Paradox
The first stage is a fission device called the "primary," usually a plutonium shell that is imploded to form a critical mass.
In the early 1960s, the United States had deployed a small tactical nuclear weapon called the Davy Crockett that could be carried and launched by a single soldier.
It reduced the nuclear threshold near to zero, and was vigorously opposed by arms control advocates.
muller.lbl.gov /TRessays/16-Weapons_Paradox.html   (1062 words)

  
 Armageddon Online - Nuclear Suitcase Bombs
Both the USA and the USSR manufactured nuclear weapons small enough to fit into large backpacks during the Cold War, but neither have ever made public the existence or development of weapons small enough to fit into a suitcase.
The smallest nuclear warhead manufactured by the USA was the W-54, used for the Davy Crockett warhead which could be fired from a 120 mm recoilless rifle, and a backpack version called the Mk-54 SADM (Small Atomic Demolition Munition).
nuclear warhead miniaturized to such an extent that it could fit into a suitcase restricts the independent development of "suitcase nukes" to only nations with highly-advanced nuclear weapons programs which have performed many nuclear tests.
www.armageddononline.net /suitcase_bomb.php   (587 words)

  
 Comprehensive information and links about Davy Crockett
Crockett was born in Greene County, Tennessee, descended mostly from Ulster-Scots.
Furthermore, Crockett was a staunch advocate of limited government and in his speech entitled "Not Yours to Give" he was critical of his Congressional colleagues willingness to spend taxpayer dollars to help a navy widow, but wouldn't contribute their own salary for a week.
Tradition has it that Crockett went down fighting inside the Alamo compound.This belief is supported by the actual evidence found at the Alamo consisting of Croketts rifle that was both marked and broken in half at his defensive position.
www.quicknation.com /Davy_Crockett.htm   (1312 words)

  
 Davy Crockett Page
The Davy Crockett Atomic Battle Group Delivery System was born of a time where the US Army felt it needed some 151,000 nuclear weapons for deployment in a protracted conflict with the Soviet Union.
Secondly, the Davy Crockett is the foundation for the concept of nuclear bazooka rounds as featured in Robert Heinlen's Starship Troopers novel and the modern spin in movie form.
The Davy Crockett artillery round was deployed to give US infantry squads the capability of destroying large units of tanks or infantry pockets on the front lines of the battlefield.
www.guntruck.com /DavyCrockett.html   (2825 words)

  
 Nuclear Terrorism - FAQs   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Nuclear material with much lower concentrations can be used in nuclear weapons, however -- and is sometimes referred to as "weapons-usable." At uranium concentrations less than 20 percent, producing an explosive chain reaction is almost impossible.
States forgo nuclear weapons for a number of reasons: inadequate national resources, technological constraints, the international nuclear taboo, international treaties, domestic politics, international inducements, security assurances, aid, threats of sanctions and coercion, and the limited strategic utility of nuclear weapons.
Moscow's assurance that "all nuclear weapons are in place" is wishful thinking since at least four nuclear submarines with nuclear warheads sank and were never recovered by the Soviet Union.
www.nuclearterrorism.org /faq.html   (2582 words)

  
 Nuclear Disarmament Party - News   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Upon getting possession of such a nuclear device, all the terrorists will have to do is deliver it to the target in a suitcase or in a trunk of a car, and detonate it.
Such nuclear weapons are far more dangerous than conventional explosives of equivalent yield due to the intense radiation emitted during the fission reaction.
Nuclear and radiological weapons kill people not only by its explosion and shock wave, but also by the radioactive material they emit.
www.nucleardisarmament.org /NuclearDisarmament/news.cfm?article_id=401&view=search_details&details=full   (2027 words)

  
 List of nuclear tests Information
In what is known as the Vela Incident, Israel and/or South Africa may have detonated a nuclear device on September 22, 1979 in the Indian Ocean, according to satellite data.
Missiles and nuclear warheads have usually been tested separately, because testing them together is considered highly dangerous (they are the most extreme type of live fire exercise).
Planned as a method to dispel doubts about whether the USA's nuclear missiles would actually function in practice, it had less effect than was hoped, as the stockpile warhead was substantially modified prior to testing, and the missile tested was a relatively low-flying SLBM and not a high-flying ICBM.
www.bookrags.com /wiki/List_of_nuclear_tests   (1299 words)

  
 RISQ | Review of International Social Questions - Preventing Nuclear Terrorism and a new Nuclear Arms Race
Such a new nuclear arms race would not be limited by the rationale behind the Cold War doctrine of mutually assured destruction (MAD) and also include terrorist organizations, which in the past have attempted to gain access to nuclear weapons.
Yet not only would the use of RNEP weapons be illegal under almost all circumstances envisioned by the supporters of such weapons, their development would also create a whole host of dangers: Smaller nuclear devices are relatively easy to transport, sell and steal, making them a target of interest for rogue states and terrorists[30] alike.
The thought that terrorists might attempt to acquire and use nuclear weapons is neither far fetched nor new: in early 1977 Red-Army-Faction[31]-terrorists attacked a U.S.Army-Depot in West-Germany in a failed attempt to acquire a nuclear weapon.
www.risq.org /article393.html   (3439 words)

  
 Dean's World - "MADM, SADM, and Davy Crockett"
I suppose it does represent something of an increase in their capability against Japan assuming that they can fit their nuclear device into a warhead on one of their longer range rockets, but it is not a substantial one.
That's why it took many tests of the W54 warhead in the Davy Crockett (and later SADM) to get it to do what was intended.
Plus a test of such a device, as a first test, precisely because it's so easily assumed to be a fizzle, has little deterrent or threatening/bullying effect (again, minus the same admission as the previous option) that it'd be crazy to not test a much more reliable 20kt design instead, as a first test.
www.deanesmay.com /posts/1160645098.comments.shtml   (925 words)

  
 nuclear
The word nuclear means of or belonging to the nucleus of something.
In sociology, the nuclear family is a family type.
The pronunciation of 'nuclear' is a matter of some dispute; see Nucular.
www.mcfly.org /nuclear   (49 words)

  
 MILNET Mirror Document: Ex-Soviet Loose Nukes
To fit a nuclear device in a suit case only 20 cm wide (as Lebed specified) would require a design that was somewhat slimmer than the W-54.
In his opinion, the viability of any nuclear weapon is not effected negatively by decay or contamination of the core material even in periods of decades, however, that refurbishment by the nuclear poweres probably does include reprocessing core material to remove Americium.
From his explanation, we might draw the conclusion that nuclear weapons must be inspected and refurbished in order to prevent them from accumulating radioactive helium gas or other toxic gases that would make storage and retrieval of weapons dangerous.
www.milnet.com /milnet/nukeweap/suitbomb.htm   (2436 words)

  
 Quotations Book: Author - Crockett, Davy quotes
Crockett, Davy · Fame · 0 fans >>
Crockett, Davy · Government · 3 fans >>
Crockett, Davy · Uncategorised · 0 fans >>
www.quotationsbook.com /authors/1770/Davy_Crockett   (310 words)

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