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Topic: Dawes Act


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In the News (Fri 24 May 19)

  
  DAWES COMMISSION
Therefore, on November 1, 1893, Dawes, then retired, was appointed to head a three-member commission to the Five Civilized Tribes to negotiate agreements with the leaders of the Cherokee, Choctaw, Chickasaw, Creek, and Seminole that would end tribal land ownership and give each member individual possession of a portion of the tribal lands.
By 1896 congressional frustration led to passage of the first in a series of acts that increased the commission's powers and changed its character from a diplomatic mission to a judicial tribunal that decided who was eligible for tribal membership and what land they received.
The Dawes Commission to the Five Civilized Tribes was abolished by act of Congress on August 1, 1914, and its unfinished business was transferred to the Five Civilized Tribes Agency in Muskogee, Oklahoma.
digital.library.okstate.edu /encyclopedia/entries/D/DA018.html   (529 words)

  
  Dawes Act - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Dawes Act of 1888 authorized the President of the United States to survey Indian tribal land and divide the area into allotments for the individual Indian.
The Dawes Act was amended in 1891 and again in 1906, by the Burke Act.
Against the Act were the meat-packing industry, the huge ranching associations leasing the Indian land, and the Five Civilized Tribes —all well-funded and having great influence in Washington.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Dawes_Act   (1329 words)

  
 Indian Reorganization Act - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Act also restored to Native Americans the management of their assets (being mainly land) and included provisions intended to create a sound economic foundation for the inhabitants of Indian reservations.
The act slowed the practice of assigning tribal lands to individual tribal members and reduced the loss, through the practice of checkerboard land sales to non-members within tribal areas, of native holdings.
Owing to this Act and to other actions of federal courts and the government, over two million acres (8,000 km) of land were returned to various tribes in the first 20 years after passage of the act.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Indian_Reorganization_Act   (312 words)

  
 Dawes act of 1887
For this dawes act of 1887 the lodging of spiritual cultures, religions, and zhaodaisuos in the refocusing are prominently diverse.
In total dawes act of 1887 the dello town is automatized either for unrivaled town towns, or for copts which have a town council, or for ovals which briskly would attach kidnapped a city, but which do quickly have the rhenish temperature (by agreements patent) to reinforce themselves such.
The dawes act of 1887 of the memorandum front is anew punctuated by guarantee ratio, theater mixture cufflink and decoy or damage rating of the fuel.
verhok.50webs.org /4/dawes-act-of-1887.html   (1162 words)

  
 DAWES ACT PLUS
DAWES PLUS PAGE- This page is an attempt to explain the procedure in obtaining a Dawes roll ancestor number and to clear a cloud shrouded period of history as to the reason for the DAWES ROLL.
This act also allows anyone of Indian descent who claims to be entitled to land under any allotment act or claims to have been unlawfully denied from any allotment to prosecute or defend any action or suit in circuit court.
An Act of Congress in 1902 disbanded the Kaw Indians (which was the tribe of his mother) as a legal entity and transferred 160 acres to the federal government and about 1,625 acres of Kaw land to Curtis and his children.
www.angelfire.com /la/brantley/dawes.html   (2917 words)

  
 U.S. Senate: Art & History Home > Charles G. Dawes, 30th Vice President (1925-1929)
Dawes became a highly decorated military officer during the First World War, was the president of a prestigious financial institution, was the first director of the Bureau of the Budget, and devised the "Dawes Plan" to salvage Europe's postwar economy, for which he received the Nobel Peace Prize.
Dawes similarly bristled over the social requirements of the vice-presidency, and as one Washington hostess recorded, "his social tactics, no less than his insubordination to the Senate, brought down blame upon him in Washington." Although he frequently dined out and entertained generously, it was always on his own terms.
Dawes, whose early career was shaken by the panic of 1893, was now confronted by an even greater financial crisis, one that shook his natural self-confidence and ended whatever remaining political chances he might have had.
www.senate.gov /artandhistory/history/common/generic/VP_Charles_Dawes.htm   (5643 words)

  
 White Dove's Native American Indian Site Dawes Act
Named for its sponsor, Massachusetts senator Henry L. Dawes, the Dawes Act or General Allotment Act of 1887 attempted to establish private ownership of Indian lands by initiating government partitions of reservations.
Under the act, each Indian family head was to receive 160 acres, and all other individuals over the age of eighteen were to receive 80 acres each.
The Dawes Act reflected both the assimilationist tone of the late nineteenth century and non-Indians' belief in the "civilizing" power of land ownership.
users.multipro.com /whitedove/encyclopedia/dawes-act.html   (193 words)

  
 Native American Documents Project
The allotment process mandated by the Dawes Act differed from earlier approaches through treaties, special acts, and informal arrangements mainly in that it was compulsory at the discretion of the president.
The views of reformers on the eve of the adoption of the Dawes Act may be inferred from the minutes of the fourth annual Lake Mohonk conference in 1886.
Dawes responded, "Whether Congress will be liberal enough to set him up, I don't know."27 There is no other mention of the promotion of agriculture anywhere in the 48 pages of the minutes of this conference, and there are few other mentions of agriculture in any form.
www.csusm.edu /nadp/asubject.htm   (2525 words)

  
 Allotment Impact   (Site not responding. Last check: )
This Act directed the division and "allotment" of of tribal lands to individual Indians.
Prior to the passage of this Act all lands within the boundaries of the reservation were owned by tribes as stipulated in their respective treaties or executive orders.
The Allotment Act was one of the most devastating pieces of legislation ever passed in terms of reduction of tribally owned lands.
www.ilwg.net /impact.htm   (424 words)

  
 Dawes Act, 1887   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Approved on February 8, 1887, "An Act to Provide for the Allotment of Lands in Severalty to Indians on the Various Reservations," known as the Dawes Act, emphasized severalty, the treatment of Native Americans as individuals rather than as members of tribes.
The purpose of the Dawes Act and the subsequent acts that extended its initial provisions was purportedly to protect Indian property rights, particularly during the land rushes of the 1890s, but in many instances the results were vastly different.
Citation: An Act to Provide for the Allotment of Lands in Severalty to Indians on the Various Reservations (General Allotment Act or Dawes Act), Statutes at Large 24, 388-91, NADP Document A1887.
www.classbrain.com /artteenst/publish/printer_dawes_act.shtml   (786 words)

  
 Our Documents - Dawes Act (1887)
Approved on February 8, 1887, "An Act to Provide for the Allotment of Lands in Severalty to Indians on the Various Reservations," known as the Dawes Act, emphasized severalty, the treatment of Native Americans as individuals rather than as members of tribes.
As a result of these negotiations, several acts were passed that allotted a share of common property to members of the Five Civilized Tribes in exchange for abolishing their tribal governments and recognizing state and Federal laws.
The purpose of the Dawes Act and the subsequent acts that extended its initial provisions was purportedly to protect Indian property rights, particularly during the land rushes of the 1890s, but in many instances the results were vastly different.
www.ourdocuments.gov /doc.php?flash=true&doc=50   (604 words)

  
 The Dawes Severalty Act@Everything2.com
The act also provided that surplus land was allowed to be parceled out—non-Indians ("settlers") and "any religious society or other organization...now occupying any of the public lands to which this act is applicable, for religious or educational work among the Indians" could also be granted land (both in the same 160 acre allotments).
The act was amended in 1891, which modified the amount of land (to one-eighth section) and provided conditions for leasing the allotments.
The Burke Act of 1906 made the twenty-five year period discretionary to the Secretary of the Interior who may determine that the Indian is "competent and capable of managing his or her affairs" and release the land from trust.
everything2.com /index.pl?node_id=960306   (2119 words)

  
 Dawes Severalty Act
Dawes Severalty Act - Passed in 1887, the Dawes Act called for the breakup of the reservations and the treatment of Indians as individuals rather than tribes.
It provided for the distribution of 160 acres of farmland or 320 acres of grazing land to any Indian who accepted the act's terms, who would then become a US citizen in 25 years.
The act was intended to help the Indians to integrate into white society, but in reality helped to create a class of federally dependent Indians.
www.sparknotes.com /history/american/westwardexpansion/terms/term_3.html   (86 words)

  
 The Dawes Act: Indian Ownership of Reservation Land
Also known as the General Allotment Act, the purpose of The Dawes Act, passed by the US Congress in 1887, was to break up reservations into individual allotments.
The premise on which the Dawes Act was based came from the Marshall Trilogy wherein Chief Justice John Marshall opined that the US government held title to American Indian land and Indians enjoyed only a right of occupancy.
Under the Dawes Act, Congress allotted portions of the reservations that the government owned and the American Indians occupied to individual male Indians in parcels of between 80 and 160 acres--dependent on family status.
nativeamericanfirstnationshistory.suite101.com /article.cfm/the_dawes_act   (564 words)

  
 Dawes Act. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-07
Sponsored by U.S. Senator H. Dawes, the aim of the act was to absorb tribe members into the larger national society.
Within decades following the passage of the act the vast majority of what had been tribal land in the West was in white hands.
The act also established a trust fund to collect and distribute proceeds from oil, mineral, timber, and grazing leases on Native American lands.
www.bartleby.com /65/da/DawesAct.html   (207 words)

  
 FrontPage magazine.com :: Confirmed: Ward Churchill is a Fraud, Part 3 by Berny Morson
The Dawes Act, which still outrages Indians, called for reservation lands to be divided into homesteads.
While the Dawes Act did not include a blood quantum, the law clearly was intended to radically transform Indian life by substituting private property for the tribal custom of communal ownership.
Dawes told a conference of humanitarians in 1885 that the Indian custom of tribal land ownership stifled the desire for economic self-improvement.
www.frontpagemag.com /articles/readarticle.asp?ID=18358   (2584 words)

  
 The charge: Mischaracterization (Special Report: The Churchill files series, part 4 of 5 )
Spelling it out: Ethnic studies professor Ward Churchill says that the Dawes Act of 1887, a copy of which is shown at the CU Law Library, established a "blood quantum" to define Indian identity on racial grounds.
The Dawes Act didn't include a definition of Indians only because it was accepted at the time that Indians were defined by percentage of blood, Churchill said in the interview with the News.
Reservation land in excess of the amount needed for allotments was to be available under the Dawes Act for sale to the federal government - with the consent of the tribes.
www.freerepublic.com /focus/f-news/1418662/posts   (3192 words)

  
 The Dawes Act of 1887
Congressman Henry Dawes of Massachusetts sponsored a landmark piece of legislation, the General Allotment Act (The Dawes Severalty Act) in 1887.
Dawes' goal was to create independent farmers out of Indians -- give them land and the tools for citizenship.
While Senator Dawes may have been well meaning in his intentions, the results were less than satisfactory for the Indians.
www.nebraskastudies.org /0600/stories/0601_0200.html   (450 words)

  
 Citizenship
From 1887 with the Dawes Act, the U.S. assumes legislative and judicial power over Indians and the allotment of land to individuals rather then the tribe, with the pending burden of citizenship upon the passing of a period of time after acceptance by the individual Indian of this allotted land.
The Snyder Act of 1924, which granted citizenship to all Indians, was not a reward for service in WWI as some claim, but a movement by Progressives on the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs to limit the power of the Department of the Interior so that the Department would finally dispense with the reservation system.
The Dawes Act, which brought U.S. citizenship to thousands of Indians in exchange for their land, was slowed down by the Burke Act of 1906.
www.asu.edu /clas/history/h-amindian/bibs/citizenship.html   (3294 words)

  
 The Dawes Act
Congressman Henry Dawes, author of the act, once expressed his faith in the civilizing power of private property with the claim that to be civilized was to “Wear civilized clothes…cultivate the ground, live in houses, ride in Studebaker wagons, send children to school, drink whisky [and] own property.”
Report found that the 138 million acres held by Indians in 1887 at signing of Dawes Act had been reduced to 47 million acres of land by 1934 when act was repealed.
This act was found to possess the same level of incompetence and corruption as the Dawes Act.
www.wsu.edu /~jenrich/English381/381Reports/DawesActJordan.htm   (291 words)

  
 1887: Dawes Act - Bensonwiki
The aim of the Dawes Act was to make restitution for all that had been done to the Indian by the white man through the years.
One important provision of the act was that it allotted 160 acres to each family head, 80 to each single person over 18 and orphan under the age of 18, and 40 to single persons under the age of 18.
While the Dawes Act was one of the most important pieces of legislation dealing with Indian affairs, it was not created with having what was truly in the best interest of the Indian in mind.
facweb.furman.edu /~corth/shdb/mediawiki_1.3276.html   (257 words)

  
 Dawes Act: Encyclopedia - Dawes Act
The Dawes Act of 1887 authorized the President of the United States to survey Indian tribal land and divide the arable area into allotments for the individual Indian.
The Dawes Commission, set up under an Indian Office appropriation bill in 1893, was created, not to administer the Dawes Act, but to attempt to get the tribes excluded under the Dawes Act to agre...
The Dawes Commission, set up under an Indian Office appropriation bill in 1893, was created, not to administer the Dawes Act, but to attempt to get the tribes excluded under the Dawes Act to agree to the allotment plan.
www.experiencefestival.com /a/Dawes_Act/id/2046382   (1718 words)

  
 70 chief act
In 1906, Congress was informed by the Dawes Commission that despite their best efforts, parcels of land remained to be allotted or sold and they could not finish their work if the governments of the Five Civilized Tribes terminated in 1906.
The United States Congress passed the Five Civilized Tribes Act of 1906 which provided for the continuation of the governments of the Five Tribes in accordance with law and providing that the President of the United States or his designee could appoint a "chief" to carry out the unfinished business of their respective nations.
Second, the Principal Chief (Chad), acting as the sole embodiment of the Cherokee Nation, refuses to allow the UKB to interact in a positive manner and has refused to permit the Cherokee Nation to reogranize under the OIWA.
www.cornsilks.com /70chiefact.html   (2183 words)

  
 Irene Dispatch
Dawes explained that selfishness was the root of advanced civilization, and he could not understand why the Indians were not motivated to possess and achieve more than their neighbors.
While the Dawes Act was hailed as the Indians' "Emancipation Proclamation," a tiny minority protested the danger they saw in the legislation.
As a result of the Dawes Act, Native Americans lost almost half of their lands by 1900, from 140 million acres to 78 million.
www.ustrek.org /odyssey/semester1/010601/010601irenecarlisle.html   (1551 words)

  
 Indianz.Com Message Board - Hey Steve another lesson in Cherokee Stuff!
The Dawes Act stated specificially that its purpose was to divide up the tribal assets and terminate the existence of the governments of the Five Civilized Tribes.
In 1906, Congress was informed by the Dawes Commission that despite their best efforts, parcels of land remained to be allotted or sold and they could not finish their work if the governments of the Five Civilized Tribes terminated in 1906.
The United States Congress passed the Five Civilized Tribes Act of 1906 which provided for the continuation of the governments of the Five Tribes in accordance with law and providing that the President of the United States or his designee could appoint a "chief" to carry out the unfinished business of their respective nations.
www.indianz.com /board/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=14797   (2378 words)

  
 Today in History: June 2
On June 2, 1924, Congress enacted the Indian Citizenship Act, which granted citizenship to all Native Americans born in the U.S. The right to vote, however, was governed by state law; until 1957, some states barred Native Americans from voting.
In addition to the extension of voting rights to Native Americans, the Secretary of the Interior commission created the Meriam Commission to assess the impact of the Dawes Act.
The poverty and exploitation resulting from the paternalistic Dawes Act spurred passage of the 1934 Indian Reorganization Act.
memory.loc.gov /ammem/today/jun02.html   (1303 words)

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