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Topic: Decebalus


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  NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Statue of Decebalus
The Statue of Dacian king Decebalus is a 40-meter high statue that is the tallest rock sculpture in Europe.
Decebalus, from Trajans Column Decebalus (ruled 87-106 CE) (Decebal in Romanian) was a Dacian king.
Decebalus then sent an invitation to Longinus, a leader of the Roman army who had made himself a terror to the king in the wars, and persuaded him to meet him, on the pretext that he would do whatever should be demanded.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Statue-of-Decebalus   (627 words)

  
 Decebalus - Definition, explanation
Decebalus (ruled 87-106 CE) (Decebal in Romanian) was a Dacian king.
Decebalus was defeated by the Romans when they invaded Dacia in 102, but he was left as a client king under a Roman protectorate.
Regalianus was, according to Tyranni Triginta a descendent of Decebalus.
www.calsky.com /lexikon/en/txt/d/de/decebalus.php   (383 words)

  
 Decebalus
A Decebalus elnevezés, amint azt a gazdag feliratanyag is bizonyítja, eléggé gyakori volt a géto-dák onomasztikonban.
Valószínûbb megoldás a „Decebalus Scorilonak” a váza fogadalmi jellegébõl adódóan, Scorilo pedig egy közeli, már elhunyt rokon lehet: apa, testvér stb.
Nem véletlen, hogy Decebalus az egyetlen dák király, akinek arcát az antik plasztika megörökítette.
www.c3.hu /~klio/klio003/klio053.html   (722 words)

  
  Cassius Dio Roman History Epitome of Book 67
Decebalus, learning of his advance, became frightened, since he well knew that on the former occasion it was not the Romans that he had conquered, but Domitian, whereas now he would be fighting against both Romans and Trajan, the emperor.
Decebalus then sent an invitation to Longinus, a leader of the Roman army who had made himself a terror to the king in the wars, and persuaded him to meet him, on the pretext that he would do whatever should be demanded.
Decebalus, when his capital and all his territory had been occupied and he was himself in danger of being captured, committed suicide; and his head was brought to Rome.
www.brainfly.net /html/books/diocas68.htm   (6202 words)

  
 Encyclopedia Of The Roman Empire: August 2006
Decebalus accepted terms for a temporary peace in 89, knowing that he was unchallenged in the field.
Decebalus fled north in 106 with the few trusted servants he had maintained over the years, finally killing himself in order to avoid capture.
The historian Dio wrote that Decebalus hid his vast treasure by diverting the course of the Sargetia River, burying the wealth in a large pit, covering it with rocks and then allowing the river to return to its normal path.
encyclopediaoftheromanempire.blogspot.com /2006_08_01_encyclopediaoftheromanempire_archive.html   (20793 words)

  
 Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Decebalus
Decebalus (ruled 87 106) (Decebal in Romanian) was a Dacian king.
Decebalus was defeated by the Romans when they invaded Dacia in 101, again in Tapae, but he was left as a client king under a Roman protectorate.
Regalianus was, according to Tyranni Triginta, a descendant of Decebalus.
www.reference.com /browse/wiki/Decebalus   (374 words)

  
 Biographies: Decebalus :: 0 A.D. :: Wildfire Games
Decebalus, who had been watching the Roman buildup decided to adopt a scorched earth policy and let the huge Roman army cross the Danube and advance into Dacia unmolested, meanwhile Decebalus called on all Dacian warriors to converge on Taepae, where he planned to make a stand against the enemy.
Decebalus agreed and Trajan returned to Rome a hero, he was even given the title of Dacius (Latin: Conqueror of Dacia) by the Senate, something that Decebalus deeply resented.
Decebalus now knew that in order for his cause to survive he had to escape, so at the last minute Decebalus and a contingent of soldiers escaped, they would go to the city of Porolissum (modern Moigrad).
wildfiregames.com /0ad/page.php?p=8403   (1769 words)

  
 Detail Page   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Decebalus proved an excellent king and a brilliant general, avoiding personal defeat at Roman hands until the reign of Trajan.
Decebalus fled north in 106 with the few trusted servants he had maintained over the years, finally killing himself in order to avoid capture.
The historian Dio wrote that Decebalus hid his vast treasure by diverting the course of the Sargetia River, burying the wealth in a large pit, covering it with rocks and then allowing the river to return to its normal path.
www.fofweb.com /Onfiles/Ancient/AncientDetail.asp?iPin=ROME0496   (506 words)

  
 Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology, page 946 (v. 1)   (Site not responding. Last check: )
the troops he could collect to Illyria, and, reject­ing the pacific though insulting overtures of De­cebalus, committed the chief command to Cor­nelius Fuscus at that time praefect of the praeto-rium, an officer whose knowledge of war was de­rived from studies prosecuted within the halls of a marble palace amid the luxuries of a licentious court.
The imperial general having passed the frontier on a bridge of boats at the head of a numerous army, perished after a most disastrous campaign, and the legions were compelled to-re­treat with the loss of many prisoners, an eagle, and the whole of their baggage and artillery.
Decebalus having in vain attempted to temporize, was at length compelled to repair to the presence of the prince, and to submit to the terms imposed by the conqueror, who demanded not only
www.ancientlibrary.com /smith-bio/0952.html   (733 words)

  
 Dacia-Province of the Roman Empire
King Decebalus came to power in the late 1st Century AD and re-centralized Dacian government.
With the occupation of the Dacian capital Sarmizegethusa and the surrounding country, Trajan was satisfied with Dacian subservience and the expedition came to a close.
Decebalus was not yet defeated, however, and in 105 AD the Dacians retook their capital and again ravaged Moesia.
www.unrv.com /provinces/dacia.php   (1048 words)

  
 Roman Emperors - DIR Trajan
Domitian had established a modus vivendi with Decebalus, essentially buying his good behavior, but the latter had then continued his activities hostile to Rome.
Decebalus, however, once left to his own devices, undertook to challenge Rome again, by raids across the Danube into Roman territory and by attempting to stir up some of the tribes north of the river against her.
It was a brutal struggle, with some of the characteristics of a war of extirpation, until the Dacian king, driven from his capital of Sarmizegethusa and hunted like an animal, chose to commit suicide rather than to be paraded in a Roman triumph and then be put to death.
www.roman-emperors.org /trajan.htm   (4312 words)

  
 Ancient world: The Enemies of Rome by Philip Matyszak - Times Online
Matyszak tells their stories stylishly and well, but it is when he turns his attention to leaders whose lives have not been endlessly dug over that his book comes into its own.
Vriathus, the freedom fighter who took to the hills, harassing heavily armoured legions with hit-and-run raids; Decebalus, the charismatic war hero who led his people in a desperate independence struggle: here, for the historian of Roman imperialism, are two particularly suggestive archetypes.
Vriathus was not the only insurgent to have exploited the potential of guerrilla tactics against the better-armed troops of an occupying power — just as Decebalus was hardly the last warlord to have steeled his own authority with an appeal to nationalism.
www.timesonline.co.uk /article/0,,2102-1351397,00.html   (1240 words)

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