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Topic: Declaration of Rights and Grievances


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The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects against unreasonable seizures and searches may not be violated; and a warrant may not issue except on probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, particularly describing the place to be searched and the persons and things to be seized.
The defendant in a criminal cause has the right to a speedy public trial, to compel attendance of witnesses in the defendant's behalf, to have the assistance of counsel for the defendant's defense, to be personally present with counsel, and to be confronted with the witnesses against the defendant.
This Constitution shall not be construed by the courts to afford greater rights to criminal defendants than those afforded by the Constitution of the United States, nor shall it be construed to afford greater rights to minors in juvenile proceedings on criminal causes than those afforded by the Constitution of the United States.
www.leginfo.ca.gov /.const/.article_1   (2708 words)

  
 The Declaration of Rights of the Stamp Act Congress, October 19, 1765
That His Majesty's liege subjects in these colonies are entitled to all the inherent rights and privileges of his natural born subjects within the kingdom of Great Britain.
That it is inseparably essential to the freedom of a people, and the undoubted rights of Englishmen, that no taxes should be imposed on them, but with their own consent, given personally, or by their representatives.
That it is the right of the British subjects in these colonies to petition the king or either house of Parliament.
www.constitution.org /bcp/dor_sac.htm   (555 words)

  
 Sailor: Maryland Declaration of Rights
That all Government of right originates from the People, is founded in compact only, and instituted solely for the good of the whole; and they have, at all times, the inalienable right to alter, reform or abolish their Form of Government in such manner as they may deem expedient.
That the right of the People to participate in the Legislature is the best security of liberty and the foundation of all free Government; for this purpose, elections ought to be free and frequent; and every citizen having the qualifications prescribed by the Constitution, ought to have the right of suffrage.
That for redress of grievances, and for amending, strengthening and preserving the Laws, the Legislature ought to be frequently convened.
www.sailor.lib.md.us /md/docs/mdright.html   (1731 words)

  
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Rights of persons in criminal prosecutions generally; self-incrimination; due process of law; right to speedy, public trial; change of venue.
Right to peaceably assemble and petition for redress of grievances, etc. That the citizens have a right, in a peaceable manner, to assemble together for the common good, and to apply to those invested with the power of government for redress of grievances or other purposes, by petition, address or remonstrance.
That this enumeration of certain rights shall not impair or deny others retained by the people; and, to guard against any encroachments on the rights herein retained, we declare that everything in this declaration of rights is excepted out of the general powers of government, and shall forever remain inviolate.
parca.samford.edu /CONST1.html   (1886 words)

  
 The Avalon Project : Declaration and Resolves of the First Continental Congress
And whereas, assemblies have been frequently dissolved, contrary to the rights of the people, when they attempted to deliberate on grievances; and their dutiful, humble, loyal, and reasonable petitions to the crown for redress, have been repeatedly treated with contempt, by his Majesty's ministers of state:
Resolved, N.C.D. That they have a right peaceably to assemble, consider of their grievances, and petition the king; and that all prosecutions, prohibitory proclamations, and commitments for the same, are illegal.
All and each of which the aforesaid deputies, in behalf of themselves, and their constituents, do claim, demand, and insist on, as their indubitable rights and liberties, which cannot be legally taken from them, altered or abridged by any power whatever, without their own consent, by their representatives in their several provincial legislature.
www.yale.edu /lawweb/avalon/resolves.htm   (705 words)

  
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That elections shall be free and equal, and the right of suffrage, as hereinafter declared, shall never be denied to any person entitled thereto, except upon a conviction by a jury of some infamous crime, previously ascertained and declared by law, and judgement thereon by court of competent jurisdiction.
That the right of trial by jury shall remain inviolate, and no religious or political test shall ever be required as a qualification for jurors.
That the citizens have a right, in a peaceable manner, to assemble together for their common good, to instruct their representatives, and to apply to those invested with the powers of government for redress of grievances, or other purposes, by address or remonstrance.
www.harbornet.com /rights/tennesse.txt   (967 words)

  
 "Declaration of the Rights of Man and the Citizen" (August 1789)
The free communication of ideas and opinions is one of the most precious of the rights of man; every citizen can then freely speak, write, and print, subject to responsibility for the abuse of this freedom in the cases is determined by law.
The guarantee of the rights of man and citizen requires a public force; this force then is instituted for the advantage of all and not for the personal benefit of those to whom it is entrusted.
All the citizens have a right to ascertain, by themselves or by their representatives, the necessity of the public tax, to consent to it freely, to follow the employment of it, and to determine the quota, the assessment, the collection, and the duration of it.
www.historyguide.org /intellect/declaration.html   (688 words)

  
 MSN Encarta - Print Preview - Declaration of Independence
The First Continental Congress passed a resolution on October 14 called the Declaration of Rights and Grievances, which denied the power of Parliament to tax the colonies and presented the king of England with a list of grievances.
Representatives to the Continental Congress declared that they had written both measures as loyal Englishmen.
In the first document, they expressed the hope that "their fellow subjects in Great Britain" would restore the relationship they had previously held with the colonies.
encarta.msn.com /text_761559234___7/Declaration_of_Independence.html   (374 words)

  
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The right of persons to work shall not be denied or abridged on account of membership or non- membership in any labor union or labor organization.
The right of the people to keep and bear arms in defense of themselves and of the lawful authority of the state shall not be infringed, except that the manner of bearing arms may be regulated by law.
The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers and effects against unreasonable searches and seizures, and against the unreasonable interception of pri- vate communications by any means, shall not be violated.
www.harbornet.com /rights/florida.txt   (930 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
To this constitution these two principles are essential; the right of our faithful subjects freely to grant your Majesty such aids as are required for the support of your government over them, and other public exigencies, and trials by their peers.
On the first of these rights the honorable house of commons found their practice of originating money; a right enjoyed by the kingdom of Ireland, by the clergy of England, until relinquished by themselves: a right, in fine, which all other your majesty’s English subjects, both within and without the realm, have hitherto enjoyed.
That your memorialists also humbly conceive another of these essential rights, to be the exemption from all taxes, but such as are imposed on the people by the several legislatures in these colonies, which rights they have also, till of late enjoyed.
www.founding.com /library/lbody.cfm?id=98&parent=47   (3723 words)

  
 Constitution of Massachusetts (1780)
A DECLARATION OF THE RIGHTS OF THE INHABITANTS
And every subject shall have a right to produce all proofs that may be favorable to him; to meet the witnesses against him face to face, and to be fully heard in his defence by himself, or his counsel, at his election.
The people have a right, in an orderly and peaceable manner, to assemble to consult upon the common good; give instructions to their representatives, and to request of the legislative body, by the way of addresses, petitions, or remonstrances, redress of the wrongs done them, and of the grievances they suffer.
www.lonang.com /exlibris/organic/1780-mdr.htm   (1393 words)

  
 Declaration of Colonial Rights   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
The Declaration of Colonial Rights, also known as Declaration of Rights or Declaration of Rights and Grievances, was a set of resolutions adopted by the First Continental Congress on October 14, 1774 to
"...state the rights of the Colonies in general, the several instances in which these rights are violated or infringed, and the means most proper to be pursued for obtaining a restoration of them." (Journals of the Continental Congress, 1774-1789 — Washington, 1904).
The first draft of this declaration was written by Major John Sullivan, delegate from New Hampshire.
www.arikah.net /encyclopedia/Declaration_of_Rights   (150 words)

  
 Declaration of Rights and Grievances, October 14 1774
Resolved, N. That by such emigration they by no means forfeited, surrendered, or lost any of those rights, but that they were, and their descendants now are, entitled to the exercise and enjoyment of all such of them, as their local and other circumstances enable them to exercise and enjoy.
Resolved, N. That they have a right peaceably to assemble, consider of their grievances, and petition the King; and that all prosecutions, prohibitory proclamations, and commitments for the same, are illegal.
All and each of which the afore-said deputies, in behalf of themselves and their constituents, do claim, demand, and insist on, as their indubitable rights and liberties; which cannot be legally taken from them, altered or abridged by any power whatever, without their own consent, by their representatives in their several provincial legislatures.
memory.loc.gov /learn/features/timeline/amrev/rebelln/rights.html   (884 words)

  
 Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen
The free communication of ideas and opinions is one of the most precious of the rights of man. Every citizen may, accordingly, speak, write, and print with freedom, but shall be responsible for such abuses of this freedom as shall be defined by law.
All the citizens have a right to decide, either personally or by their representatives, as to the necessity of the public contribution; to grant this freely; to know to what uses it is put; and to fix the proportion, the mode of assessment and of collection and the duration of the taxes.
Since property is an inviolable and sacred right, no one shall be deprived thereof except where public necessity, legally determined, shall clearly demand it, and then only on condition that the owner shall have been previously and equitably indemnified.
www.constitution.org /fr/fr_drm.htm   (833 words)

  
 Declaration of Rights. 1909-14. American Historical Documents, 1000-1904. The Harvard Classics   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
That his majesty’s liege subjects in these colonies, are entitled to all the inherent rights and liberties of his natural born subjects, within the kingdom of Great Britain.
That it is inseparably essential to the freedom of a people, and the undoubted right of Englishmen, that no taxes be imposed on them but with their own consent, given personally, or by their representatives.
That the duties imposed by several late acts of parliament, from the peculiar circumstances of these colonies, will be extremely burdensome and grievous; and from the scarcity of specie, the payment of them absolutely impracticable.
www.bartleby.com /43/13.html   (426 words)

  
 §5. John Dickinson. VIII. American Political Writing, 1760–1789. Vol. 15. Colonial and Revolutionary ...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
The repeal of the Stamp Act (March, 1766) caused a sudden cessation of the agitation in America; and the ominous Declaratory Act, asserting for the first time the right of Parliament “to bind the colonies and people of America, subjects of the crown of Great Britain, in all cases whatsoever,” received little attention.
The colonies, in resisting the Stamp Act, had dwelt upon the unconstitutionality of internal taxation by a Parliament in which they were not represented.
Townshend now sought to turn the tables by imposing the external taxes which he professed to think the colonies, by inference, had conceded the right of Parliament to impose.
www.bonus.com /contour/bartlettqu/http@@/www.bartleby.com/225/0805.html   (547 words)

  
 Bill of Rights: Pennsylvania Constitution of 1776, Declaration of Rights
That all men are born equally free and independent, and have certain natural, inherent and inalienable rights, amongst which are, the enjoying and defending life and liberty, acquiring, possessing and protecting property, and pursuing and obtaining happiness and safety.
That the people have a right to freedom of speech, and of writing, and publishing their sentiments; therefore the freedom of the press ought not to be restrained.
That the people have a right to bear arms for the defence of themselves and the state; and as standing armies in the time of peace are dangerous to liberty, they ought not to be kept up; And that the military should be kept under strict subordination to, and governed by, the civil power.
press-pubs.uchicago.edu /founders/documents/bill_of_rightss5.html   (487 words)

  
 Declaration of Independence
The grievances in the Declaration served a different purpose: …to justify revolution by proving that George III was a tyrant."
Mason: That all men are born equally free and independent, and have certain inherent natural rights, of which they cannot, by any compact, deprive or divest their posterity, among which are the enjoyment of life and liberty, with the means of acquiring and possessing property, and pursuing and obtaining happiness and safety
One of the early roadblocks to the declaration of independence was a fear of democracy--heretofore an unsuccessful form of government.
www.saumag.edu /edavis/DeclarationofIndependenceMaierNotes.html   (1128 words)

  
 American History Sources - Declaration of Rights and Grievances 1774
That by such emigration they by no means forfeited, surrendered, or lost any of those rights, but that they were, and their descendants now are entitled to the exercise and enjoyment of all such of them, as their local and other circumstances enable them to exercise and enjoy.
That the respective colonies are entitled to the common law of England, and more especially to the great and inestimable privilege of being tried by their peers of the vicinage, according to the course of that law.
That they have a right peaceably to assemble, consider of their grievances, and petition the King; and that all prosecutions, prohibitory proclamations, and commitments for the same, are illegal.
www.brandywinesources.com /1701-1775/1774HTMLRightsandGrieves.html   (758 words)

  
 Confederate Cause - Government as the Founders Intended
Declaration of Rights and Grievances, the correspondence related to the
The first ten Amendments, commonly referred to as the Bill of Rights, was written to appease demands by state delegates that the rights of individuals and their general agents, the state legislatures, would reserve all rights not specifically delegated to the federal government.
Therefore, by virtue of both the 9th and 10th Amendments, the states reserved the right to withdraw from the federal union for any reason deemed appropriate by such state.
www.geocities.com /confederate_cause/thecause-founders-intent.htm   (1352 words)

  
 Freedom.org Home Page
Declaration of Rights and Grievances adopted by the First Continental Congress.
The men who signed the Declaration July 4, 1776, knew that their action would result in war, and an era of uncertainty.
These people died to win the right to form their own government, and live is they chose to live, rather than to be subjects of an omnipotent king.
www.freedom.org   (759 words)

  
 Delaware Declaration of Rights (1776)
A Declaration of Rights and Fundamental Rules of the Delaware State, formerly stiled, The Government of the counties of New-Castle, Kent and Sussex, upon Delaware.
That the right in the people to participate in the Legislature, is the foundation of liberty and of all free government, and for this end all elections ought to be free and frequent, and every freeman, having sufficient evidence of a permanent common interest with, and attachment to the community, hath a right of suffrage.
That for redress of grievances, and for amending and strengthening of the laws, the Legislature ought to be frequently convened.
www.lonang.com /exlibris/organic/1776-ddr.htm   (476 words)

  
 Declaration of Independence - Declaration of Rights Essay
The Declaration of Independence is, without a doubt, the most influential document in the illustrious history of the United States, and possibly the world.
The purpose of the Declaration was to justify the revolution, to declare colonial independence, and to express the new nation's principles.
The Declaration of Rights set the standard for many important events around the nation, including the abolishing of slavery, granting women the right to vote, en....
www.bookrags.com /essays/story/2004/2/28/144246/478   (315 words)

  
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ALABAMA DECLARATION OF RIGHTS (Article I of the 1901 Constitution of Alabama) As amended through 1966 ARTICLE I. That the great, general, and essential principles of liberty and free government may be recognized and established, we declare: Sec.
And, to guard against any encroachments on the rights herein retained, we declare that everything in this Declaration of Rights is excepted out of the general powers of government, and shall forever remain inviolate.
25 That the citizens have a right, in a peaceable manner, to assem- ble together for the common good, and to apply to those invested with the power of government for redress of grievances or other purposes, by petition, address, or remonstrance.
www.harbornet.com /rights/alabama.txt   (1038 words)

  
 Women's Rights Movement in the U.S.: Timeline
The primary goal of the organization is to achieve voting rights for women by means of a Congressional amendment to the Constitution.
The Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) is passed by Congress and sent to the states for ratification.
Originally drafted by Alice Paul in 1923, the amendment reads: "Equality of rights under the law shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex." The amendment died in 1982 when it failed to achieve ratification by a minimum of 38 states.
www.factmonster.com /spot/womenstimeline1.html   (1476 words)

  
 The Continental Congress’ Declaration of Rights and Grievances
And you are also hereby empowered to conclude and agree with the other commissioners, upon such measures as you shall think necessary and proper for obtaining redress of the grievances of the colonies, agreeably to the instructions given you by the general assembly of this colony.
The congress resumed the consideration of the rights and privileges of the British American colonists, etc., the same was referred after sundry debates, for further consideration.
Saturday, Oct. 19th, 1765, A. M.—The congress met according to adjournment, and resumed, etc., as yesterday; and upon mature deliberation, agreed to the following declarations of the rights and grievances of the colonists in America, which were ordered to be inserted.
www.brandywinesources.com /1701-1775/1765DOCJournalStampActCongress.htm   (3837 words)

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