Factbites
 Where results make sense
About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   PR   |   Contact us  

Topic: Defenestrations of Prague


Related Topics

  
  Prague
Prague (Praha in Czech) is the capital and largest city of the Czech Republic.
Founded in the latter part of the 9th century, Prague soon became the seat of the kings of Bohemia, some of whom later reigned also as emperors of the Holy Roman Empire.
Prague suffered serious flooding in August 2002, with parts of the city having to be evacuated.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/pr/Prague.html   (355 words)

  
 Defenestrations of Prague
The First Defenestration of Prague involved the killing of seven members of the city council by a crowd of radical Czech Hussites on July 30, 1419.
The Second Defenestration of Prague was an event central to the initiation of the Thirty Years' War in 1618.
A defenestration (chronologically the second defenestration of Prague) happened on September 24, 1483, when a violent overthrow of the municipal governments of the Old and New Towns ended with throwing the Old-Town portreeve and the bodies of seven killed aldermen out of the windows of the respective townhalls.
music.musictnt.com /biography/sdmc_Defenestrations_of_Prague   (675 words)

  
 Prague   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-17)
Prague is the wealthiest city in Central and Eastern Europe, and wealthier than many in Western Europe, with a per-capita GDP (PPP) of EUR 31,369, which is at 149% of the European Union average.
Prague is served by Ruzyn&283; International Airport, which is the hub of the flag carrier, CSA Czech Airlines.
Prague is also the site of Most important offices and institutions of the Czech Republic, including the President, the Government and both houses of the Parliament.
prague.iqnaut.net   (705 words)

  
 Prague - ExampleProblems.com
Prague was founded in the latter part of the 9th century as a castle (hrad) by the king Borivoj.
Prague was the now the capital of a Communist Republic under the military and political control of Soviet Union, and in 1955 it entered in the Warsaw Pact.
Prague is served by Ruzyně International Airport (10,000,000 passengers per year), which is the hub of the flag carrier, CSA Czech Airlines.
www.exampleproblems.com /wiki/index.php/Prague   (2146 words)

  
 Prague
Nicknames for Prague have included "city of a hundred spires", "the golden city", "the Paris of the Twenties in the Nineties", the "mother of all cities", and "the heart of Europe".
Those four towns were Hradcany (the Castle, west of the Vltava), Mala Strana (the Lesser Quarter, south of the Castle), Stare Mesto (the Old Town, on the east bank opposite the Castle) and Nove Mesto (the New Town, further south and east).
Some of its many tourist attractions are Stare Mesto, various places connected to Franz Kafka, Mala Strana, Hradcany with St. Vitus's Cathedral, the Charles Bridge, and the Lennon Wall.
www.teachtime.com /en/wikipedia/p/pr/prague.html   (429 words)

  
 Prague - Definition, explanation
Nicknames for Prague have included "city of a hundred (or thousand) spires", "the golden city", "the Paris of the Twenties in the Nineties", the "mother of all cities", and "the heart of Europe".
Prague is a traditional cultural center, hosting many theaters including: National Theatre, The Rudolfinum (home to the Czech Philharmonic Orchestra), opera houses, concert halls, galleries and music clubs.
Prague is the wealthiest city in Central and Eastern Europe, and wealthier than many in Western Europe, with a per-capita GDP (PPP) of EUR 32,357, which is at 153% of the European Union average.
www.calsky.de /lexikon/en/txt/p/pr/prague.php   (955 words)

  
 Telgen Vacation Report: Prague, January 2000
At various times in its 1000-plus years Prague has been the capital of Bohemia and of the Holy Roman Empire, not to mention the center of its own periods of revival, and there are buildings that survive from all these periods.
This picture was taken from atop the tower of the Old Town Hall ("Old Town" is one of the districts of the city), from which one of the two famous defenestrations of Prague took place.
Prague is full of history from various eras, and all kinds of different buildings survive because the city escaped relatively unscathed, bombing-wise, from World War II.
www.neglet.com /Prague00.htm   (809 words)

  
 Brujula.Net - Your Latin Stating Point   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-17)
Prague is the capital and largest city of the Czech Republic.
Prague is the wealthiest city in Central and Eastern Europe, and wealthier than many in Western Europe, with a per-capita GDP of EUR 31,369, which is at 149% of the European Union average.
Prague is served by Ruzyně International Airport, which is the hub of the flag carrier,
www.brujula.net /english/wiki/Prague.html   (505 words)

  
 Qwika - similar:Wenceslas_Square
Hradčany from the Petřín Tower Hradčany ((help·info)), the Castle District, is the Prague district surrounding the Prague Castle.
Prague Castle at night The Prague Castle (Czech: Pražský hrad) is the castle in Prague where the Czech kings, Holy Roman Emperors and presidents of the Czech Republic (and Czechoslovakia) have had their offices.
Prague Castle is one of the biggest castles in the world (according to Guinness Book of Records the biggest ancient castle [1])...
www.qwika.com /rels/Wenceslas_Square   (1699 words)

  
 Defenestrations of Prague
There were two incidents in the history of Bohemia, and one in the history of Czechoslovakia, known as the Defenestrations of Prague, the first in 1419 and the second in 1618.
The First Defenestration of Prague involved the killing of seven members of the hostile city council by a crowd of radical Czech Hussites on July 30, 1419.
In the days after the successful coup of the communists, known as the Victorious February[?], the only remaining non-communist minister, Jan Masaryk, was victim to a deadly "open window accident" in a bathroom of the foreign ministry in Prague.
ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/de/Defenestration_of_Prague.html   (194 words)

  
 Prague Travel
Prague is a historical novel by Arthur Phillips about a group of North American expatriates in Budapest, Hungary circa 1990, at the end of the cold war.
Two incidents in the history of Bohemia are known as the Defenestrations of Prague, the first in 1419 and the second in 1618 (though the second is generally considered ''The'' Defenestration of Prague).
At Prague Castle on May 23, 1618, an assembly of Protestants tried two Imperial governors (Vilem Slavata and Jaroslav Martinic) for violating the Letter of Majesty, found them guilty and threw them, together with their scribe Fabricius, out of the high castle windows and into a large and conveniently-placed pile of manure.
www.artistbooking.com /trips/159/prague-travel.html   (2075 words)

  
 Old Prague
Literary lore holds that Prague is never so beautiful as when it snows, so Wro got very excited when he saw several skiers retrieving their gear at the airport luggage carousels.
Prague's first snow came late this year, in mid-January, but it snowed every day for a week, with giant, heavy flakes that floated to earth like spun sugar, sticking to the city's famous chestnut trees, but melting on its streets.
Prague was also the dividing line between Eastern Orthodox and Western Roman Catholic churches; and then the no man's land between Protestantism and Catholicism.
www.postcardsforyou.com /shiroldprague.html   (2543 words)

  
 Defenestrations of Prague - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-17)
Two incidents in the history of Bohemia are known as the Defenestrations of Prague.
The first occurred in 1419 and the second in 1618 (the term 'Defenestration of Prague' is most commonly used to refer to the second incident).
A defenestration (chronologically the second defenestration of Prague) happened on September 24, 1483, when a violent overthrow of the municipial governments of the Old and New Towns ended with throwing the Old-Town portreeve and the bodies of seven killed aldermen out of the windows of the respective townhalls.
88.208.194.172 /wiki/index.php/Defenestration_of_Prague   (521 words)

  
 Prague
Those four towns were Hradcany (the Castle District, west of the Vltava), Mala Strana (the Lesser Quarter, south of the Castle), Stare Mesto (the Old Town, on the east bank opposite the Castle) and Nove Mesto (the New Town, further south and east).
Public transport infrastructure consists of three metro lines, as well as tramway lines and buses.
Prague - virtual tours, basic facts, history, sights, culture...
www.guajara.com /wiki/en/wikipedia/p/pr/prague.html   (454 words)

  
 For other places of the same name see Prague disambiguation...
The astronomical clock in the "Old Square" of Prague The astronomical clock in the "Old Square" of Prague Prague is a traditional cultural center, hosting many theaters (including National Theatre), opera houses, concert halls, galleries and music clubs.
Prague suffered serious flooding in August 2002 2002, with parts of the city having to be evacuated.
Prague is served by Ruzyne International Airport Ruzyne International Airport, which is the hub of the flag carrier, CSA Czech Airlines CSA Czech Airlines "See also:" Defenestrations of Prague Defenestrations of Prague
www.biodatabase.de /Prague   (680 words)

  
 Defenestrations of Prague - Historic Event - German Archive: Defenestrations of Prague (German: Fenstersturz zu Prag) ...
Defenestrations of Prague - Historic Event - German Archive: Defenestrations of Prague (German: Fenstersturz zu Prag) is the term by which two incidents in the history of Bohemia are known.
Defenestrations of Prague (German: Fenstersturz zu Prag) is the term by which two incidents in the history of Bohemia are known.
The Second Defenestration of Prague was an event central to the initiation of the Thirty Years' War in 1618.
germannotes.com /archive/article.php?products_id=480&...   (487 words)

  
 Defenestrations of Prague biography .ms   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-17)
Two incidents in the history of Bohemia, and a further one in the history of Czechoslovakia are known as the Defenestrations of Prague, the first in 1419 and the second in 1618 (though the second is generally considered The Defenestration of Prague).
At Prague Castle on May 23, 1618, a number of them took two Imperial governors and a scribe and threw them out of the castle windows; they landed in some manure, and none of them were severely injured.
A third "defenestration" occurred on March 10, 1948, when Czechoslovak Foreign Minister Jan Masaryk, the country's only remaining non-socialist minister, was found dead under the bathroom window of the Foreign Ministry building in Prague following the establishment of a clearly Communist-dominated government a month earlier.
www.biography.ms /Defenestrations_of_Prague.html   (271 words)

  
 This World Traveler
Prague is probably one of the more confusing cities that I've had the pleasure to explore.
Much of it is free, but there are approximately a dozen museums in the area, some of which is related to the history of the Prague castle, but many are not.
We left the castle by way of the Golden Way (which you also must buy a ticket for, but is part of A or B level tickets at the Prague Castle) to see the workplace of Franz Kafka.
www.thisworldtraveler.com /prague3.html   (894 words)

  
 TDF Travel Program Prague-Budapest 2006   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-17)
Newly-renovated and in pristine condition, the President is the perfect base from which to explore Prague.
Prague’s Old Town lies along the right bank of the Vltava River spreading out from Old Town Square, whose colorful Renaissance buildings line the picturesque cobblestone streets.
Prague is a walker’s delight, with countless lovely churches, elegant villas and picturesque streets to explore.
www.tdf.org /travel/prague06_itin.html   (1161 words)

  
 2004 TDF New Years Eve in Prague 2004-5 Full Itinerary   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-17)
Even Prague’s residents, accustomed to the beauty surrounding them, take time during the season to stroll the streets, admire the decorations and bask in the holiday excitement.
Prague; the New Town was laid out in the 14th century by Charles IV, Holy Roman Emperor.
Many of Prague’s narrow streets cannot accommodate buses, and buses are strictly prohibited from stopping to pick up and discharge passengers in most historic areas.
www.tdf.org /travel/praguenye_itin.html   (1161 words)

  
 Partnerstädte Main
During the reign of Emperor Karl IV (1346 - 1378), Prague, already one of the largest towns in Europe, was made a capital city and experienced her heyday.
Prague became a capital city again with the establishment of the Czech Republic.
During the autonomous Communist rule, Prague was capital of the Czechoslovakian Socialist Republic (CSSR) but was also the centre for political counter-movements such as the "Prague Spring" of 1968 and the "Peaceful Revolution" of 1989.
www.partnerstaedte.nuernberg.de /ver2003/englisch/02081_prag.html   (828 words)

  
 Prague
The result of this was the emigration of the German professors and students to the University of Leipzig in May 1409.
While the inhabitants of Prague had remained roughly even, by 1909 the Czech students at the Czech Karl-Ferdinand University numbered 4300 students and the students at the German Karl-Ferdinand University numbered 1800.
In Prague 24 of 50 metro stations are wheelchair accessible; however, most of these stations are in the outskirts of the city, and the majority of stations in the city center remained inaccessible.
www.websters-online-dictionary.org /Pr/Prague.html   (3125 words)

  
 A - PRAGUE.com - Prague Guide: Prague Informative Guide, Prague Travel Information in our Guide
The new Prague town walls surrounded 7,5 km², of which one third was covered by the new city.
It is an area of central Prague, formerly the Jewish ghetto of the town.
Hradčany is the Prague district surrounding the Prague Castle.
www.a-prague.com /guide?pozice=3   (876 words)

  
 The Defenestrations of Prague quiz -- free game
In the Second Defenestration of Prague the members of the Bohemian aristocracy defenestrated, not only the two royal (Habsburg) officials, but also a third person not directly involved in the main action.
The Second Defenestration of Prague began the 30 Years War which was a religious war and involved many countries.
The Third and most recent Defenestration of Prague occured in 1948 when a member of the Czechoslovakian government was found under the window of a government building.
www.funtrivia.com /playquiz.cfm?qid=191689   (256 words)

  
 November 28, 2005 | Prague-blogs.com
Much as I love the city of Prague, the Golden Lane, on all the tourist itinaries, must be one of the most over-rated places to see.
The lighting of the giant Christmas tree in Prague’s Old Town Square heralds the joy of the holidays for most of the city’s inhabitants.
It doesn't nestle in quite as closely with many of Prague's other attractions, but it is well signposted once you get to the vicinity on foot or by tram.
www.prague-blogs.com /2005/11/28   (582 words)

  
 Prague   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-17)
(It can be derived from jobs statistics, however, that additional 300,000 work there without having registered as residents.) Nicknames for Prague have included "city of a hundred spires", "the golden city", "the Paris of the Twenties in the Nineties", the "mother of all cities", and "the heart of Europe".
The city flourished during the 14th century reign of Charles IV, who ordered the building of the New City, the Charles Bridge, Saint Vitus Cathedral, the oldest gothic cathedral in central Europe and actually inside the Castle, and the Charles University, the oldest university in central Europe north of the Alps.
Prague - virtual tours, basic facts, sights, culture...
prague.kiwiki.homeip.net   (808 words)

  
 Talk:Defenestrations of Prague - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
AFAICS the author has meant the two defenestrations of 1419 and 1618 as those two in the history of Bohemia, and the "defenestration" of Jan Masaryk in 1948 as that one in the history of Czechoslovakia.
Masaryk is not considered to be defenestration and unfortunately it has never been officially concluded that he was actually killed (although, I believe so; the only alternatives is that he was lead by the Communist terror to commit a suicide, which does not make much difference to me in terms of guilt).
Actually the defenestrations in Prague were so numerous that Jerome K. Jerome wrote in “Three Men on a Bummel” (sequel to more known “Three Men in a Boat”) that the fact there had been some successful agreements concluded in Prague means that they had to be agreed upon in a basement.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Talk:Defenestrations_of_Prague   (572 words)

Try your search on: Qwika (all wikis)

Factbites
  About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   Press   |   Contact us  
Copyright © 2005-2007 www.factbites.com Usage implies agreement with terms.