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Topic: Delusional misidentification syndrome


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In the News (Tue 18 Jun 19)

  
  Delusional misidentification syndrome - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Delusional misidentification syndrome is an umbrella term for a group of delusional disorders that occur in the context of mental or neurological illness.
Delusional companions is the belief that objects (such as soft toys) are sentient beings
Shanks, M.F. and Venneri, A. The emergence of delusional companions in Alzheimer's disease: An unusual misidentification syndrome.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Delusional_misidentification_syndrome   (389 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Delusion   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Delusional jealousy or Othello syndrome is a psychiatric disorder in which a person holds a delusional belief that their spouse or sexual partner is being unfaithful.
Delusional disorder is a psychiatric diagnosis denoting a mental illness that involves holding one or more non-bizarre delusions in the absence of any other significant psychopathology (signs or symptoms of mental illness).
The Jerusalem syndrome is the name given to a group of mental phenomena involving the presence of either religiously themed obsessive ideas, delusions or other psychosis-like experiences, that are triggered by, or lead to, a visit to the city of Jerusalem.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Delusion   (2266 words)

  
 Capgras delusion - Open Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
The Capgras delusion or Capgras' syndrome is a rare disorder in which a person holds a delusional belief that an acquaintance, usually a close family member or spouse has been replaced by an identical looking imposter.
Capgras delusion is classed as a delusional misidentification syndrome, a class of delusional beliefs that involves the misidentification of people, places or objects.
Although Capgras is commonly called a syndrome, it may occur as part of, or alongside various other disorders and conditions, such as schizophrenia and neurological illness.
www.open-encyclopedia.com /Capgras_delusion   (471 words)

  
 Delusion - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
delusional memory - where a delusional belief is based upon the recall of memory or false memory for a past experience.
This is known as the Martha Mitchell effect, after the wife of the attorney general who alleged that illegal activity was taking place in the White House.
In practice psychiatrists tend to diagnose a belief as delusional if it is either patently bizarre, causing significant distress, or excessively pre-occupies the patient, especially if the person is subsequently unswayed in belief by counter-evidence or reasonable arguments.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Delusion   (1084 words)

  
 Fregoli delusion - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Fregoli delusion or Fregoli syndrome is a rare disorder in which a person holds a delusional belief that different people are in fact a single person who changes their appearance or is in disguise.
Often this belief is of a paranoid nature with the delusional person believing that they are being persecuted by the person whom they believe to be following them.
The Fregoli delusion is classed as a delusional misidentification syndrome, a class of delusional beliefs that involves the misidentification of people, places or objects.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Fregoli_syndrome   (251 words)

  
 Delusional misidentification syndrome   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
However, similar delusional beliefs, often singularly or more rarely reported, are sometimes also considered to be part of thedelusional misidentification syndrome.
There is considerable evidence that disorders such as the Capgras or Fregoli syndromes are associatedwith disorders of face perception and recognition.
Shanks, M.F. and Venneri, A. (2002) The emergence of delusional companions in Alzheimer's disease: An unusualmisidentification syndrome.
www.therfcc.org /delusional-misidentification-syndrome-84477.html   (350 words)

  
 Capgras' syndrome (www.whonamedit.com)
Delusional misidentification, illusion of doubles, illusion de sosies (French), illusion of negative doubles, misidentification syndrome, nonrecognition syndrome, phantom double syndrome, subjective doubles syndrome.
As a variant of this syndrome the patient believes that inanimate objects, such as furniture, a letter, a watch, spectacles, have been replaced by an exact double.
The syndrome typically accompanies other functional psychoses (such as schizophrenia or affective disorders), although it tends to be the dominating feature.
www.whonamedit.com /synd.cfm/2535.html   (279 words)

  
 Capgras Syndrome | Jef's web files   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
CAPGRAS SYNDROME is a delusional misidentification syndrome in which the patient denies the identity of a person or persons.
The patient with Capgras syndrome often claims that the misidentified person is an imposter or "double" of the real person, and that there are two versions of the misidentified person.
Capgras syndrome may be caused by a variety of neurological and psychiatric conditions (e.g., delirium).
www.jefallbright.net /node/825   (105 words)

  
 CJP - November 2004 - Capgras Syndrome: A Review of the Neurophysiological Correlates and Presenting Clinical Features ...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Capgras syndrome (CS) is a common type of delusional misidentification syndrome, that is, the false belief in doubles and duplicates (1).
CS was defined either as the delusional belief that imposters replaced people familiar to the individual or as a delusion of misidentification directed at the individuals themselves (120).
Bilateral cerebral pathology and the genesis of delusional misidentification.
www.cpa-apc.org /Publications/Archives/CJP/2004/november/bourget.asp   (5011 words)

  
 The dangerousness of persons with misidentification syndromes. J. A. Silva, G. B. Leong and R. Weinstock   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
The central feature of misidentification syndromes is the presence of a delusion in which either the identity of the self or other persons is misrecognized.
The authors report on a series of 29 individuals whose delusional misidentification was associated with aggressive behaviors.
Important parameters which may assist in defining this sample of dangerous delusional misidentification syndrome persons are discussed.
www.emory.edu /AAPL/Bull/J201-077.htm   (73 words)

  
 Migraine Syndrome   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
In 1989 an outbreak of eosinophilia-myalgia syndrome was traced to an improperly prepared 1000 batch of tryptophan.
DiGeorge syndrome DiGeorge syndrome is a hereditary disease resulting in an inability to fight infections (immunodeficiency) associated with the absence of the thymus glands, low calcium levels associated with the absence of the parathyroid glands and abnormalities of the heart.
DeQuervain's syndrome DeQuervain's Syndrome, named for Swiss surgeon Fritz De Quervain who first identified it in 1885 (also known as "washerwoman's sprain"), is an inflammation of the sheath or tunnel that surrounds two tendons that control movement of the thumb.
www.datapheed.com /Migraine+Syndrome-40.html   (508 words)

  
 delusion   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
For example, a person sees a red car and knows that this means their food is being poisoned by the police.
Many religious beliefs hold exactly the same features, yet are not considered delusional.
In practice psychiatrists tend to diagnose a belief as delusional if it is either patently bizarre, causing significant distress, or excessively pre-occupies the patient, especially if the person is subsequently unswayed in their belief by counter-evidence or reasonable argument.
www.yourencyclopedia.net /Delusion.html   (1094 words)

  
 Delusional misidentification syndrome   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Subjective doubles - in which a person believes there is a doppelganger or double of him or herself carrying out independent actions.
Ellis, H.D., Luauté, J.P. & Retterstol, N. Delusional misidentification syndromes.
Shanks, M.F. & Venneri, A. (2002) The emergence of delusional companions in Alzheimer's disease: An unusual misidentification syndrome.
www.sciencedaily.com /encyclopedia/delusional_misidentification_syndrome   (422 words)

  
 [No title]
In both cases the delusional beliefs remained isolated from a more rational belief system which was operative in other cognitive domains” (105) RZ shifted the content of her delusional belief, and sometimes reverted to a confused state when pressed (e.g.
Firstly she accepts a belief which is incoherent with the rest of her beliefs, and secondly she refuses to modify that belief in the face of fairly conclusive counter-evidence and a set of background beliefs which contradict the delusional belief.” (114) *Distinguish: forming a delusion belief from maintaining a delusional belief.
--Perhaps a delusional belief is maintained because of the modularity, and cognitive impenetrability, of the mechanisms generating such beliefs.
comp.uark.edu /~efunkho/RationalityNotes10.doc   (656 words)

  
 Capgras' Delusion
Also know as Delusional misidentification, illusion of doubles, illusion of negative doubles, misidentification syndrome, nonrecognition syndrome, phantom double syndrome, subjective doubles syndrome.
This feeling in a delusional world of doubles can be so alarming that it drives the Capgras sufferer to psychotic behavior.
A reasonable pharmacological treatment approach for the person with delusional disorder is a standard trial of an antipsychotic or SSRI at starting doses commonly used to treat psychotic or mood disorders.
www.psychnet-uk.com /dsm_iv/capgras_syndrome.htm   (482 words)

  
 Delusion - Term Explanation on IndexSuche.Com
Studies on psychiatric patients have shown that delusions can be seen to vary in intensity and conviction over time which suggests that certainty and incorrigibility are not necessary components of a delusional belief1.
Some religious or spiritual beliefs (such as 'I believe in the existence of God') including those diagnosed as delusional, by their nature may not be falsifiable, and hence cannot be described as false or incorrect3.
Delusions typically occur in the context of neurological or mental_illness, although are not tied to any particular disease and have been found to occur in the context of many pathological states (both physical and mental).
www.indexsuche.com /Delusion.html   (611 words)

  
 Members - Cardiff Cognitive Neuropsychiatry Research Group   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Studies of neurological patients suffering from prosopagnosia and psychiatric patients diagnosed as having one of the delusional misidentification syndromes.
For example, Capgras delusion, which is the belief that significant others have been replaced by doubles, robots, aliens etc., involving ambivalent feelings etc. My approach is to try to explain delusions such as these within a cognitive neuropsychiatric framework, using models of normal information processing to make sense of often quite bizarre phenomena.
Understanding of cognitive deficits in delusional misidentification syndromes in terms of the dual route model of normal face recognition.
www.cf.ac.uk /psych/ccnrg/members.html   (607 words)

  
 Directory of open access journals
Capgras’ syndrome is the delusion of the existence of identical “doubles” of significant people in a patient’s life, the objects or of the patient himself or herself.
In the etiology of this syndrome which occurs in a variety of psychotic states like schizophrenia, psychodynamic and organic factors are considered.
In this case report, a patient with Capgras’ syndrome in whom psychodynamic features predominates is presented and discussed.
www.doaj.org /abstract?id=92361&toc=y   (108 words)

  
 4Reference || Fregoli delusion   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
The condition is named after the Italian actor Leopold Fregoli who was renowned for his ability to make quick changes of appearance during his stage act.
She believed that these people "persued her closely, taking the form of people she knows or meets".
Like Capgras delusion, it is thought to be related to a breakdown in normal face recognition processes.
www.4reference.net /encyclopedias/wikipedia/Fregoli_delusion.html   (260 words)

  
 Dangerous Delusional Misidentification and Homicide. Silva JA, Harry BE, Leong GB, Weinstock R . 1996;41(4): 641-644.   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Abstract: A case involving a delusional misidentification syndrome associated with homicide is presented.
The anglophonic literature concerning delusional misidentification and homicide is reviewed.
Delusional misidentification may be a risk factor for potential violence toward others, including homicide of a delusionally misidentified person.
www.astm.org /jforensicsci/PAGES/2427.htm   (76 words)

  
 Interictal Psychosis Presenting With Fregoli Syndrome -- Duggal 16 (4): 543 -- Journal of Neuropsychiatry
syndrome is described and the neurobiological basis of the syndrome
Capgras syndrome, the commonest of the DMS involving "hypo-identification,"
Joseph AB, O’Leary DH: Anterior cortical atrophy in Fregoli syndrome.
neuro.psychiatryonline.org /cgi/content/full/16/4/543   (613 words)

  
 Delusion - Encyclopedia.WorldSearch   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
# delusional perception - where a normal percept is interpreted with delusional meaning.
# delusional atmosphere - where the world seems subtly altered, uncanny, portentous or sinister.
# delusional memory - where a delusional belief is based upon the recall of memory or false memory for a past experience.
encyclopedia.worldsearch.com /delusion.htm   (1276 words)

  
 Capgras delusion   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
It is named after Joseph Capgras (1873 - 1950) a French psychiatrist who first described the disorder in a paper by Capgras and Reboul-Lachaux
The Autism Home Page Cotard Syndrome (the delusion that one is dead), Fregoli Syndrome, and Capgras Syndrome.
The EndTime Delusion Aliens are fallen angels interacting with Man throughout history and will be the great delusion of the End Times.
www.serebella.com /encyclopedia/article-Capgras_delusion.html   (676 words)

  
 Capgras delusion   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Capgras delusion is classed as a delusional misidentification syndrome, a class of delusional beliefs that involvesthe misidentification of people, places or objects.
Although Capgras is commonly called a syndrome, it may occur as part of, oralongside various other disorders and conditions, such as schizophrenia and neurological illness.
Forstl H,Almeida OP, Owen AM, Burns A, Howard R. Psychiatric, neurological and medical aspects of misidentification syndromes: a review of 260 cases.
www.therfcc.org /capgras-delusion-84476.html   (464 words)

  
 Fregoli delusion   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
The Fregoli delusion or Fregoli syndrome is a rare disorder in which person holds a delusional belief that different people are in a single person who changes their appearance is in disguise.
The Fregoli delusion is classed as a delusional misidentification syndrome a class of delusional beliefs that the misidentification of people places or objects.
Capgras delusion it is thought to be related a breakdown in normal face perception.
www.freeglossary.com /Fregoli_syndrome   (601 words)

  
 Delusion - InfoSearchPoint.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
However, this definition and Jasper's original criteria have been criticised, as counter-examples can be shown for every defining feature.
Another thorn in the side of such diagnosis is that almost all of these factors can be found in normal beliefs.
Delusions typically occur in the context of neurological or mental illness, although are not tied to any particular disease and have been found to occur in the context of many pathological states (both physical and mental).
www.infosearchpoint.com /display/Delusion   (716 words)

  
 Table of contents for Library of Congress control number 98017210   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Outline and introduction: a brief perspective on the delusional disorders Part II.
Illnesses Which are Liable to be Misdiagnosed as Delusional Disorders: 11.
Non-psychotic disorders which may simulate delusional disorders Part V. Treatment of Delusional Disorder and Overall Conclusions: 13.
www.loc.gov /catdir/toc/cam027/98017210.html   (158 words)

  
 Delusional Thoughts in Alzheimer's Disease -- SHANKS and VENNERI 161 (4): 764 -- American Journal of Psychiatry
Delusional Thoughts in Alzheimer's Disease -- SHANKS and VENNERI 161 (4): 764 -- American Journal of Psychiatry
between delusional "severity" and the degree of impairment of
Venneri A, Shanks MF, Staff RT, Della Sala S: Nurturing syndrome: a form of pathological bereavement with delusions in Alzheimer disease.
ajp.psychiatryonline.org /cgi/content/full/161/4/764-b   (502 words)

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