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Topic: Demosthenes


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In the News (Sun 26 May 19)

  
  Demosthenes
Demosthenes and most of his contemporaries did not see it that way; to them the leadership of Macedon was seen as the 'death of Greek political liberty' Some people dismiss Demosthenes' outbursts as a political rhetoric, others hold his political abuse of Philip from Macedon as historical facts, undeniably blunt and truthful.
Demosthenes unlike Isocrates does not mask his national ideals with "Panhellenistic union" against the Persians, but boldly and aggressively calls his Hellenic nation to an uprising against the barbarian from the north -the Kingdom of Macedon and its king Philip.
Demosthenes died from a dose of poison on the island of Calauria, in the altar of Poseidon.
www.historyofmacedonia.org /AncientMacedonia/demosthenes.html   (3422 words)

  
  Demosthenes
Demosthenes' career as a specialist on international relations started in 355 but it took him a couple of years to find his role as the archenemy of the Macedonian king Philip II, whom he had correctly identified as the greatest threat to Athenian autonomy, and -incorrectly- thought could be beaten.
Demosthenes retorted with the famous remark that as far as he was concerned, Alexander could be venerated as son of Zeus, "and as son of Poseidon as well, if he wants to".
Demosthenes embarked again upon a war policy, and although he appears to have made mistakes and was briefly exiled because he had not been more successful, there was indeed a Greek insurrection when Alexander died on 11 June 323 in Babylon (the Lamian war).
www.livius.org /de-dh/demosthenes/demosthenes.html   (1344 words)

  
  Demosthenes. Plutarch. 1909-14. Plutarch’s Lives. The Harvard Classics   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Demosthenes, the father of Demosthenes, was a citizen of good rank and quality, as Theopompus informs us, surnamed the Sword-maker, because he had a large work-house, and kept servants skilful in that art at work.
Therefore, Demosthenes, having heard the tutors and schoolmasters agreeing among themselves to be present at this trial, with much importunity persuades his tutor to take him along with him to the hearing; who, having some acquaintance with the door-keepers, procured a place where the boy might sit unseen, and hear what was said.
Demosthenes appeared publicly in a rich dress, with a chaplet on his head, though it were but the seventh day since the death of his daughter, as is said by Æschines, who upbraids him upon this account, and rails at him as one void of natural affection towards his children.
www.bartleby.com /12/7.html   (5589 words)

  
 DEMOSTHENES - Online Information article about DEMOSTHENES   (Site not responding. Last check: )
This was the first time that the voice of Demosthenes himself had been heard on the public concerns of Athens, and the utterance was a worthy prelude to the career of a statesman.
It was Demosthenes who went to Byzantium, brought the estranged city back to the Athenian alliance, and snatched it from the hands of Philip.
The hatred of the Macedonian party towards Demosthenes, and the fury of those vehement patriots who cried out that he had betrayed their best opportunity, combined to procure his condemnation, with the help, probably, of some appearances which were against him.
encyclopedia.jrank.org /DEM_DIO/DEMOSTHENES.html   (6341 words)

  
 Demosthenes (general) - Definition, explanation
Demosthenes and Hippocrates were unable to coordinate their attacks and Hippocrates was defeated at the Battle of Delium.
In 421 Demosthenes was one of the signatories of the Peace of Nicias which ended the first half of the war.
Demosthenes landed his troops but was defeated, and upon seeing the disease-ridden Athenian camp, suggested that they immediately give up the siege and return to Athens, where they were needed to defend against a Spartan invasion of Attica.
www.calsky.com /lexikon/en/txt/d/de/demosthenes__general_.php   (646 words)

  
 Demosthenes - Succeed through Studying Biographies
Demosthenes (384-320 BC) was one of the greatest orators in ancient Greece and a contemporary of Plato and Aristotle.
Demosthenes was born in Athens, Greece in 384 B.C. to a wealthy family.
Demosthenes was a student of Greek history, and he used historical parallels in many of his public speeches.
www.school-for-champions.com /biographies/demosthenes.htm   (1623 words)

  
 Ethics of Philip, Demosthenes, and Alexander by Sanderson Beck
Demosthenes was born in 384 BC; his father died before he was eight, leaving his sword and furniture factories with their 55 slaves, an estate worth nearly 14 talents, in the custody of two nephews and a friend.
When Demosthenes passed a law compelling the rich to fulfill their obligations and relieve the troubles of the poor and enabling the country to equip itself, a similar indictment was brought against him; he was acquitted, and the accuser did not even get the minimum votes needed to avoid a penalty.
Demosthenes summarized his strategy as using Euboea as a defense for Attica on the sea, Boeotia on the mainland, and the Peloponnesians there, while maintaining the grain route to Peiraeus along the coasts and in the Chersonese and depriving the enemy of their sources of power.
www.san.beck.org /EC22-Alexander.html   (14797 words)

  
 Demosthenes, Greece, ancient history
Demosthenes started getting involved with law and politics, but he was not very successful because of his inability to pronounce the letter "r", occasional stutter, weak lungs and spastic shoulder.
Demosthenes overcame most of these problems through various methods: he practiced speech with pebbles in his mouth, hung a spear so that it stung him in his shoulder when it twitched, and ran in stairs and on hills to strengthen his lungs.
Demosthenes escaped to the island Calauria after the Athenians had warranted a deathsentence on all patriots on the demand of Alexander's succsessor Antipater.
www.in2greece.com /english/historymyth/history/ancient/demosthenes.htm   (361 words)

  
 Plutarch's Life of Demosthenes
Therefore, Demosthenes, having heard the tutors and schoolmasters agreeing among themselves to be present at this trial, with much importunity persuades his tutor to take him along with him to the hearing; who, having some acquaintance with the doorkeepers, procured a place where the boy might sit unseen, and hear what was said.
Demosthenes appeared publicly in a rich dress, with a chaplet on his head, though it were but the seventh day since the death of his daughter, as is said by Aeschines, who upbraids him upon this account, and rails at him as one void of natural affection towards his children.
Demosthenes at first gave advice to chase him out of the country, and to beware lest they involved their city in a war upon an unnecessary and unjust occasion.
www.bostonleadershipbuilders.com /plutarch/demosthenes.htm   (5900 words)

  
 The Internet Classics Archive | Demosthenes by Plutarch
Demosthenes, the father of Demosthenes, was a citizen of good rank and quality, as Theopompus informs us, surnamed the Sword-maker, because he had a large workhouse, and kept servants skilful in that art at work.
Therefore, Demosthenes, having heard the tutors and school-masters agreeing among themselves to be present at this trial, with much importunity persuades his tutor to take him along with him to the hearing; who, having some acquaintance with the doorkeepers, procured a place where the boy might sit unseen, and hear what was said.
Demosthenes appeared publicly in a rich dress, with a chaplet on his head, though it were but the seventh day since the death of his daughter, as is said by Aeschines, who upbraids him upon this account, and rails at him as one void of natural affection towards his children.
classics.mit.edu /Plutarch/demosthe.html   (5131 words)

  
 Demosthenes - History for Kids!
Demosthenes was born in Athens about 385 BC, in the Hellenistic period.
Demosthenes also wrote a lot of speeches for men who were going to appear in court.
Demosthenes was one of the first people to see that Philip of Macedon was going to try to take over Greece.
www.historyforkids.org /learn/greeks/literature/demosthenes.htm   (596 words)

  
 DEMOSTHENES
Demosthenes was an Athenian statesman, military leader and orator who attempted to rally the people of Athens to oppose the military advances of Phillip of Macedon, and later, Philip's son, Alexander the Great.
Demosthenes was the son of a wealthy sword maker in Athens.
Demosthenes eventually escaped into exile as well but was later recalled to the city when patrons agreed to pay his fines.
members.tripod.com /~michaelroth/bio054.htm   (689 words)

  
 Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology, page 982 (v. 1)   (Site not responding. Last check: )
This verdict was obtained bv Demosthenes in the face of all the
It is very doubtfol whether Demosthenes, like some of his predecessors-, engaged also in teaching rhetoric, as some of his Greek bio­graphers assert.
Public opinion condemned Meidias, and it was in vain that he made all pos­sible efforts to intimidate Demosthenes, who re­mained firm in spite of all his enemy's machinations, until at length, when an amicable arrangement was proposed, Demosthenes accepted it, and withdrew his accusation.
www.ancientlibrary.com /smith-bio/0988.html   (809 words)

  
 Demosthenes, Demosthenes Statue, Demosthenes Sculpture, Ancient Greek Art, Greek Sculpture, Greek Statue
Demosthenes, Demosthenes Statue, Demosthenes Sculpture, Ancient Greek Art, Greek Sculpture, Greek Statue
Demosthenes (384 BC –; 322 BC) is generally
Demosthenes was quiet, but as soon as the
www.ancientsculpturegallery.com /255.html   (126 words)

  
 Demosthenes
Demosthenes, the son of a prosperous sword maker, was orphaned when he was only 8.
Demosthenes' diligent work was successful and at the age of 25 he had entered public life.
Ethics of Philip, Demosthenes, and Alexander by Sanderson...
www.demosthenes.com   (1124 words)

  
 Demosthenes. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05
Philip triumphed in the battle of Chaeronea (338), and Demosthenes’ cause was lost.
Demosthenes roundly defended his own career and attacked that of Aeschines in On the Crown (330).
Demosthenes fled and took poison before he could be captured.
www.bartleby.com /65/de/Demosthe.html   (392 words)

  
 Demosthenes, from Lives of the Ten Orators, at Peitho's Web
DEMOSTHENES, the son of Demosthenes by Cleobule, the daughter of Gylon, was a Paeanian by descent.
And Demosthenes told them, that he did not flee to Calauria to save his life, but that he might convince the Macedonians of their violence committed even against the Gods themselves.
Some say this writing was found: "Demosthenes to Antipater, Greeting." Philochorus tells us that he died by drinking of poison; and Satyrus the historiographer will have it, that the pen was poisoned with which he wrote his epistle, and putting it into his mouth, soon after he tasted it he died.
classicpersuasion.org /pw/plu10or/pludemos.htm   (2358 words)

  
 De vereniging voor en door mensen die stotteren.
Demosthenes is een vereniging van en voor mensen die stotteren en ouders van stotterende kinderen.
Voor iedereen die stottert is het belangrijk om anderen te ontmoeten die ook met stotteren te maken hebben.
Wordt (als je dat nog niet bent) lid of donateur van de Nederlandse Stottervereniging Demosthenes.
www.demosthenes.nl   (176 words)

  
 Demosthenes: The Peloponnesian Wars   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Among the operations of the sixth summer of the Peloponnesian wars was a campaign which the Athenian commander Demosthenes conducted in Aetolia-successful at the outset, but terminating in disaster, which made the general afraid to return to Athens.
Demosthenes, however, who had a project of his own in view, was given an independent command.
He had the wit, however, to choose Demosthenes for his colleague, and to take precisely the kind of troops Demosthenes wanted; with the result that within twenty days the Spartans found themselves with no other alternatives than annihilation or surrender.
www.publicbookshelf.com /public_html/Outline_of_Great_Books_Volume_I/whodemost_i.html   (324 words)

  
 Demosthenes
Demosthenes From Sterwiki right Demosthenes was een Grieks redenaar, jurist en politicus, die leefde van 384 tot 322 v.
Demosthenes werd voor het leven getekend én gehard door zware tegenslagen (fysiek en materieel) in zijn kinderjaren.
Demosthenes bestreed hem in zijn magistrale 'Kransrede', die Aeschines noopte in ballingschap te gaan.
www.hypotheek-verzekeringen-vragen.nl /financieel_nieuws/2005/03/29/finnieuws_Demosthenes.html   (268 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: )
DEMOSTHeNES Speech Composer is a general-purpose multilingual and polyglot software text-to-speech (TtS) system that supports the Greek language.
DEMOSTHeNES targets to the delivery of intelligible and human-like speech from a wide variety of e-text sources.
DEMOSTHeNES is appropriate for multimedia applications (spoken encyclopaedias, presentations etc), voice technology applications (e.g.
demosthenes.di.uoa.gr /en/information.shtml   (111 words)

  
 First Philippic by Demosthenes
They forgot that Philip might renew his attempt, and thought they had provided sufficiently for their security by posting a body of troops at the entrance of Attica, under the command of Menelaus, a foreigner.
They then proceeded to convene an assembly of the people, in order to consider what measures were to be taken to check the progress of Philip; on which occasion Demosthenes, for the first time, appeared against that prince, and displayed those abilities which proved the greatest obstacle to his designs.
In the time of Demosthenes this law was not in force.
www.4literature.net /Demosthenes/First_Philippic   (962 words)

  
 Demosthenes (The Nation, August 25, 1881)
So much honest, hard work has been put into this book by both author and translator that one cannot help sincerely regretting that the product is not more worthy of commendation.
It abounds in illustrations and parallels, mostly from Roman and French history and literature, and in quotations from orators contemporary with Demosthenes.
But, after all, the book will be of little use to any one desiring to get a clear and true idea of the man and his policy.
www.thenation.com /archive/detail/14071035   (151 words)

  
 DLS: Demosthenes   (Site not responding. Last check: )
When Demosthenes was swindled out of his inheritance, he went to plead his case before the Athens council, but was ridiculed because of his harsh and unmusical voice, weak lungs, and awkward movements.
He shut himself up in a cave, shaved half his head to remove any temptation to return to the outside world, and polished his speech to incandescence by speaking with pebbles in his mouth.
In so doing he incurred the enmity of Aeschines, who argued that Philip's intentions were peaceable; Demosthenes succeeded in having Aeschines ostracized (330), but was himself later forced into exile (324).
www.uga.edu /~demsoc/demosthenes.htm   (242 words)

  
 Demosthenes - Crystalinks
Demosthenes (384 BC 322 BC) is generally considered the greatest of the Attic orators, and thus the greatest of all Ancient Greek orators. His writings provide an insight into the life and culture of Athens at this period of time.
As a boy Demosthenes suffered from a speech impediment and he worked at a series of self-designed exercises to overcome it. A common story tells of his talking around mouthfuls of rocks to improve his diction, but it is unknown whether this is fact or merely a legendary example of his perseverance and determination.
Demosthenes was exiled after a convoluted affair involving money taken by one of the lieutenants of Alexander the Great. He was recalled to the Greek states after Alexander died, where he attempted once again to rally the Athenian people against Macedonia, but he was unsuccessful and took poison rather than face capture and punishment.
www.crystalinks.com /demosthenes.html   (359 words)

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