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Topic: Dengue


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In the News (Thu 18 Jan 18)

  
  Dengue Fever Fact Sheet - CDC Division of Vector-Borne Infectious Diseases (DVBID)
In 2005, dengue is the most important mosquito-borne viral disease affecting humans; its global distribution is comparable to that of malaria, and an estimated 2.5 billion people live in areas at risk for epidemic transmission (Figure 4).
This approach has been particularly detrimental to dengue control because, in most countries, surveillance is (just as in the U.S.) passive; the system to detect increased transmission normally relies on reports by local physicians who often do not consider dengue in their differential diagnoses.
Prospects for reversing the recent trend of increased epidemic activity and geographic expansion of dengue are not promising.
www.cdc.gov /ncidod/dvbid/dengue   (1944 words)

  
  Dengue Fever (breakbone, dengue hemorrhagic fever) : Bureau of Communicable Disease : NYC DOHMH
Dengue fever, an acute mosquito-borne febrile disease, is caused by the dengue viruses.
Dengue is spread by the bite of a mosquito infected with a dengue viruses.
Dengue hemorrhagic fever is first characterized by a fever that lasts from 5 to 7 days with symptoms that can occur with many other illnesses (e.g., nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and headache).
www.nyc.gov /html/doh/html/cd/cdden.shtml   (298 words)

  
  Dengue Fever
Dengue fever is a disease caused by a virus spread by the bite of an infected mosquito, uncommon in Wisconsin.
Dengue fever is spread by the bite of infected Aedes mosquitoes.
Dengue fever is characterized by the rapid development of a fever that may last from three to seven days, intense headache, joint and muscle pain, loss of appetite, diarrhea and a rash.
healthlink.mcw.edu /article/954993538.html   (398 words)

  
  Dengue Fever
Dengue fever is a mosquito-borne disease caused by a virus.
Dengue fever is spread by the bite of infected Aedes mosquitoes.
Dengue fever is characterized by the rapid development of a fever that may last from five to seven days with intense headache, joint and muscle pain and a rash.
www.state.sd.us /doh/Pubs/dengue.htm   (289 words)

  
 Dengue
The Dengue virus is a member of the virus family Flaviviridae and is transmitted to people through the bite of the mosquitos Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus.
Dengue virus is now believed to be the most common arthropod-borne disease in the world.
Dengue is mainly found in the tropics because the mosquitoes require a warm climate.
www.stanford.edu /group/virus/flavi/2000/dengue.htm   (739 words)

  
 MedlinePlus: Dengue
The primary NIH organization for research on Dengue is the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases
Dengue is an infectious disease caused by a virus.
Sometimes dengue turns into dengue hemorrhagic fever, which causes bleeding from your nose, gums or under your skin.
www.nlm.nih.gov /medlineplus/dengue.html   (242 words)

  
 Dengue Fever Facts   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
Dengue fever is a flu-like illness spread by the bite of an infected mosquito.
Dengue hemorrhagic fever is a severe, often fatal, complication of dengue fever.
Dengue and dengue hemorrhagic fever are caused by any of the dengue family of viruses.
www.astdhpphe.org /infect/dengue.html   (1008 words)

  
 Dengue
Dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF), a potentially lethal complication, was first recognized during the 1950s and is today a leading cause of childhood mortality in several Asian countries.
Dengue haemorrhagic fever is a potentially deadly complication that is characterized by high fever, haemorrhagic phenomena—often with enlargement of the liver—and in severe cases, circulatory failure.
This approach has been particularly detrimental to dengue control because, in most countries, surveillance is very inadequate; the system to detect increased transmission normally relies on reports by local physicians who often do not consider dengue in their differential diagnoses.
www.lawestvector.org /Dengue.htm   (1395 words)

  
 Ministry of Health: About MOH: FAQs   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
Dengue fever is a disease caused by the dengue virus which can be transmitted to humans by the bite of an infected mosquito.
Dengue is transmitted to humans by the bite of infected Aedes mosquitoes.
Dengue fever is characterized by the sudden onset of fever, (which can last up to 7 days) and is accompanied by intense headache, body aches, joint pains, loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting and the development of skin rashes.
www.moh.gov.sg /corp/about/faqs/illness/details.do?cid=cat_faqs_illness_dengue&id=23920641   (722 words)

  
 Dengue   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
Dengue virus, first isolated in 1943, is morphologically indistinguishable from the agent causing yellow fever.
Dengue fever is usually mild and nonspecific in most children, associated with pharyngitis, rhinitis, mild cough, and fever for several days to a week.
Classic dengue fever, most likely to occur in older children and adults, is a febrile viral syndrome of sudden onset, characterized by fever for 2-5 days (often biphasic and rarely lasting more than 7 days), severe headache, intense myalgias, arthralgias, retro-orbital pain, anorexia, and rash.
home.coqui.net /myrna/dengue.htm   (933 words)

  
 Hospitals overwhelmed as dengue fever sweeps India | The Guardian | Guardian Unlimited
But it is dengue that is causing the greatest concern after reports yesterday that three members of the prime minister's family were taken to hospital suffering with high fever, a dengue symptom.
Dengue fever is an infectious disease, transmitted by mosquitoes and found in hot and humid climates.
In theory, dengue's spread is predictable in India and the onset of winter kills the mosquitoes that transmit the disease.
www.guardian.co.uk /international/story/0,,1888660,00.html   (461 words)

  
 Mosquito and Tick-Borne Diseases—Dengue
Dengue hemorrhagic fever causes death in more than 20 percent of cases of the disease when medical attention is unavailable.
Dengue is a virus that is closely related to the yellow fever virus.
Dengue fever in older children and adults is characterized by a sudden onset of high fever, severe headache, muscle aches, intense muscle and joint pain (break-bone fever), nausea, weakness, vomiting, and rash.
www.factmonster.com /cig/dangerous-diseases-epidemics/dengue.html   (867 words)

  
 Dengue fever
Dengue fever is a viral illness transmitted by mosquitoes.
Dengue fever begins with sudden onset of a high fever, often to 104-105 degrees Fahrenheit, headache, and slightly later the appearance of severe joint and muscle pains.
Dengue fever should not be confused with Dengue hemorrhagic fever, which is a separate disease and frequently fatal.
www.healthscout.com /ency/article/001374.htm   (285 words)

  
 Dengue Fever   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
Dengue fever is considered "endemic" to certain regions, which means it is native to, or naturally occurring, in these areas.
Dengue fever is more likely to occur during or shortly after the rainy season, when the mosquito population is larger.
Dengue fever is not contagious, which means one person cannot pass it directly to another.
www.hmc.psu.edu /healthinfo/d/denguefever.htm   (841 words)

  
 Dengue
From feeding on an infected and viraemic human, the female mosquito is able to transmit the dengue virus after an incubation period of 8-10 days wherein virus infection, replication and dissemination result in infection of the salivary glands making the mosquito infective for life.
Dengue is a debilitating infection of comparatively short duration with a high attack rate but a low fatality rate.
Dengue virus occurs as four serotypes, designated DEN 1, 2, 3 and 4; each has been involved in both uncomplicated dengue and in cases with haemorrhagic syndrome.
medent.usyd.edu.au /fact/dengue.htm   (647 words)

  
 Dengue Fever
Dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) are viral diseases transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes, usually Ae.
Dengue, a rapidly expanding disease in most tropical and subtropical areas of the world, has become the most important arboviral disease of humans.
Future dengue incidence in specific locales cannot be predicted accurately, but a high level of dengue transmission is anticipated in all tropical areas of the world for the indefinite future.
www.webmd.com /a-to-z-guides/dengue-fever-shc   (751 words)

  
 Dengue: Arboviridae, Arenaviridae, Bunyaviridae, and Filoviridae: Merck Manual Professional
Dengue fever usually results in the abrupt onset of high fever, headache, myalgias, arthralgias, lymphadenopathy, and a rash that appears with a 2nd temperature rise after an afebrile period.
Dengue is endemic to the tropical regions of the world in latitudes from about 35° north to 35° south.
Dengue fever is suspected in patients in endemic areas who develop sudden fever, headache, myalgias, and adenopathy, particularly with the characteristic rash or recurrent fever.
www.merck.com /mmpe/sec14/ch191/ch191b.html   (841 words)

  
 Malaysia Medical Association   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
Dengue is a mosquito-borne infection and is found in tropical and sub-tropical regions around the world, predominantly in urban and semi-urban areas.
Dengue haemorrhagic fever is a potentially deadly complication that is characterized by high fever, haemorrhagic phenomena and in severe cases, circulatory failure.
Vaccine development for dengue and DHF is difficult because any of the different viruses may cause disease, and because protection against only one or two dengue viruses could actually increase the risk of more serious disease.
www.mma.org.my /current_topic/dengue.htm   (979 words)

  
 eMedicine - Dengue Fever : Article by Daniel D Price, MD   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
Dengue fever is a benign acute febrile syndrome occurring in tropical regions.
Dengue is a homonym for the African ki denga pepo, which appeared in English literature during an 1827-28 Caribbean outbreak.
The first definite clinical report of dengue is attributed to Benjamin Rush in 1789, but the viral etiology and its mode of transmission via mosquitos were not established until the early 20th century.
www.emedicine.com /emerg/topic124.htm   (1516 words)

  
 [No title]
Prior to 1981, dengue and its more severe form, dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), were considered to be a public health problem of Asia and posed little or no threat to the Region of the Americas.
The appearance of dengue forced control schemes to change their approach, which had previously been oriented to avoid reintroduction of yellow fever, to a program based on source reduction and focal treatment with larvicides.
Guatemala’s dengue situation for 2000 is that 5,963 cases were reported up to epidemiological week 40, an 85% increase from the number of cases reported the previous year during the same period.
www.paho.org /English/SHA/be_v21n4-dengue.htm   (2427 words)

  
 CDC - Yellow Book: [4] Dengue Fever - CDC Travelers' Health
Future dengue incidence in specific locales cannot be predicted accurately, but a high level of dengue transmission is anticipated in all tropical areas of the world for the indefinite future.
Dengue fever is characterized by sudden onset after an incubation period of 3-14 days (most commonly 4-7 days), high fevers, severe frontal headache, and joint and muscle pain.
Physicians should consider dengue in the differential diagnosis of all patients who have fever and a history of travel to a tropical area within 2 weeks of onset of symptoms.
www2.ncid.cdc.gov /travel/yb/utils/ybGet.asp?section=dis&obj=dengue.htm   (1433 words)

  
 Dengue
Dengue is caused by 4 closely related viruses transmitted by Aedes aegypti mosquitoes.
Although scientists are still far from understanding why only some dengue infections lead to hemorrhagic disease, it is clear that factors such as age of the person and previous exposure to dengue infections increase risk of severe disease.
Dengue viruses are transmitted throughout the year in Southwest Sri Lanka, although in some years an increase in the number of cases has been observed in the middle of the year (June-August) and/or towards the end of the year (Dec- Feb).
www.unc.edu /~desilva/dengue.htm   (655 words)

  
 Dengue Fever   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
The spread of dengue is attributed to expanding geographic distribution of the four dengue viruses and of their mosquito vectors, the most important of which is the predominantly urban species Aedes aegypti.
Dengue fever virus is considered the most important arbovirus in terms of morbidity, mortality and economic cost with an estimated 100 million cases of dengue fever occurring throughout the world annually.
Dengue is transmitted by mosquito and occurs in epidemic and endemic proportions throughout tropical and subtropical regions of the world.
www.sdnbd.org /dengue_fever.htm   (2459 words)

  
 Dengue Fever in Indonesia - Prevention and Treatment
Dengue fever is a relatively common problem in Indonesia and periodically reaches epidemic proportions in Jakarta and other parts of Indonesia, usually every 4-5 years.
Dengue occurs due to infection by a flavivirus which is transmitted by the bite of the Aedes mosquito.
A fever occurs in nearly all dengue infections in children; the other most common symptoms are a red throat, a (usually mild) runny nose, cough, and mild gastrointestinal symptoms which of course may present similar to pharyngitis, influenza, and upper respiratory infections.
www.expat.or.id /medical/dengue   (2230 words)

  
 Dengue Fever - Digestion and digestive-related information on MedicineNet.com
Dengue fever is a disease caused by a virus that is transmitted by mosquitos.
The presence (the "dengue triad") of fever, rash, and headache (and other pains) is particularly characteristic of dengue.
Dengue is endemic throughout the tropics and subtropics.
www.medicinenet.com /dengue_fever/article.htm   (341 words)

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