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Topic: Depersonalization


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In the News (Sun 21 Apr 19)

  
  Mount Sinai - Department of Psychiatry
The depersonalization and dissociation research program is dedicated to studying the phenomenology, etiology and treatment of dissociative disorders, primarily depersonalization disorder.
We are collecting data in an ongoing way about the different phenomenological aspects of the syndrome of depersonalization, including variations in symptomatology, types of onset, factors alleviating and exacerbating the symptoms, co-morbid disorders and course of treatments.
In particular, depersonalization subjects can manifest significant impairments in certain types of attention and memory, while retaining an overall intact level of intellectual functioning.
www.mssm.edu /psychiatry/ddrp.shtml   (261 words)

  
  Depersonalization - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The DSM-IV categorizes depersonalization disorder as a form of dissociative disorder.
The symptoms associated with depersonalization have a known connection with psychological trauma.
Laing used depersonalization to mean a fear of the loss of autonomy in interpersonal relationships by the ontologically insecure.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Depersonalization   (638 words)

  
 [No title]
Typically, depersonalization is a state in which an individual experiences a "split" in consciousness between a "participating self" and an "observing self." The participating self is composed of body, thoughts, feelings, memories, and emotions.
There are also secondary characteristics of depersonalization, which may include: feelings of dizziness, floating, or giddinesss, a feeling of the participating self being "dead," a loss of affective responsiveness, and a feeling of calm detachment (Levy and Wachtel 1978).
Depersonalization, an experience in which the perception of the self is altered, is sometimes accompanied by derealization, an experience in which perception of one's environment is altered.
minet.org /Documents/research.1990.castillo   (1095 words)

  
 DISSOCIATIVE AMNESIA   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-29)
Bezzubova, E.B. [Depersonalization as a developmental disorder of].
Cohen, S.I. The pathogenesis of depersonalization: A hypothesis.
Shader, R.I., and Scharfman, E,L. Depersonalization disorder (or depersonalization neurosis).
atrium.issd.org /membersonly/coons/coons1.htm   (12243 words)

  
 Ask the Expert   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-29)
Depersonalization is the sense that one's body or one's self is strange or unreal.
Depersonalization and derealization are part of a group of symptoms and disorders termed dissociative.
Keep in mind, though, that depersonalization is a common symptom in the general population; that it arises from many possible causes; and that it does not always represent a full-fledged psychiatric disorder.
www.mhsource.com /expert/exp1111102a.html   (268 words)

  
 [No title]
Typically, depersonalization is a state in which an individual experiences a "split" in consciousness between a "participating self" and an "observing self." The participating self is composed of body, thoughts, feelings, memories, and emotions.
There are also secondary characteristics of depersonalization, which may include: feelings of dizziness, floating, or giddinesss, a feeling of the participating self being "dead," a loss of affective responsiveness, and a feeling of calm detachment (Levy and Wachtel 1978).
Depersonalization, an experience in which the perception of the self is altered, is sometimes accompanied by derealization, an experience in which perception of one's environment is altered.
www.minet.org /Documents/research.1990.castillo   (1095 words)

  
 Depersonalization Disorder Research -- Neurotransmitter.net
In this paper the descriptive characteristics of depersonalization are discussed with regard to the features of "observing self" and the relationship between experiences and selves, according to which the authors distinguish two types of depersonalization: an "excessive-self-reflecting type" and an "absorbed-in-experience type".
Depersonalization and derealization are commonly reported in the general population as a response to stress.
Induction of depersonalization by the serotonin agonist meta-chlorophenylpiperazine.
www.neurotransmitter.net /depersonalization.html   (13644 words)

  
 What Are Dissociative Disorders?   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-29)
Depersonalization is a common experience, and this diagnosis should be made only if the symptoms are sufficiently severe to cause marked distress or impairment in functioning (Criterion C).
Often individuals with Depersonalization Disorder may have difficulty describing their symptoms and may fear that these experiences signify that they are "crazy." Derealization may also be present and is experienced as the sense that the external world is strange or unreal.
Depersonalization that is caused by the direct physiological effects of a substance is distinguished from Depersonalization Disorder by the fact that a substance (e.g., a drug of abuse or a medication) is judged to be etiologically related to the depersonalization (see p.
www.m-a-h.net /library/did-general/mpd-did.htm   (5917 words)

  
 [No title]
Depersonalization is a common experience, and this diagnosis should be made only if the symptoms are sufficiently severe to cause marked distress or impairment in functioning).
Depersonalization is the third most common psychiatric symptom and frequently occurs in life-threatening danger, such as accidents, assaults, and serious illnesses and injuries; it can occur as a symptom in many other psychiatric disorders and in seizure disorders.
Depersonalization is a very unpleasant feeling, despite the fact that is often manifests itself by a seeming lack of feeling, says German psychologist Ursula Oberst.
www.depersonalization.info /overview.html   (3650 words)

  
 Depersonalization Disorder
Depersonalization disorder is marked by periods of feeling disconnected or detached from one’s body and thoughts (depersonalization).
Depersonalization disorder is one of a group of conditions called dissociative disorders.
Depersonalization is a common symptom of many psychiatric disorders and often occurs in dangerous situations, such as assaults, accidents or serious illnesses.
www.clevelandclinic.org /health/health-info/docs/3800/3823.asp?index=9791   (884 words)

  
 eMedicine - Dissociative Disorders : Article by Idan Sharon, MD   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-29)
Derealization or depersonalization is characterized by feelings that the objects of the external environment are changing shape and size, or that people are automated and inhuman, and features detachment as a major defense.
Depersonalization is defined as persistent or recurrent experiences of feeling detached, as if one is an outside observer of one's mental processes or body.
The depersonalization does not occur exclusively during the course of another mental disorder and is not due to direct effects of substance abuse or general medication.
www.emedicine.com /med/topic3484.htm   (5716 words)

  
 BPhoenix: Depersonalization Disorder
Depersonalization is estimated to be the third most common psychiatric symptom, and frequently occurs during life-threatening experiences, such as accidents and assaults.
Reality testing is not impaired during a depersonalization episode, but the fear that they are "going crazy" may make some people reluctant to discuss their symptoms with their doctor and may increase anxiety which in turn can trigger more episodes of depersonalization.
When episodes of depersonalization are frequent and severe, a diagnosis of Depersonalization Disorder may be given.
www.angelfire.com /home/bphoenix1/depers.html   (879 words)

  
 depersonalization
Depersonalization is characterized by a feeling of detachment or estrangement from one's self.
Depersonalization can be a component of anxiety disorder such as panic disorder or post traumatic stress disorder.
Depersonalization is something that at times can make you feel that you want to drink but I did not want to create another problem.
www.medhelp.org /forums/mentalhealth/messages/30984a.html   (536 words)

  
 Welcome to the International Society for the Study of Dissociation   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-29)
Depersonalization is the sense of being detached from, or “not in” one’s body.
Depersonalization Disorder is characterized by a persistent or recurrent feeling of being detached from one’s own mental processes or body.
The lack of empirical treatment studies on depersonalization adversely impacts the understanding and treatment of other dissociative disorders due to the fact that depersonalization is often a component of these disorders (Simeon et al., 2001).
www.issd.org /indexpage/FAQ2.htm   (5777 words)

  
 Past Forward: Depersonalization Disorder (Mental Body Imbalance)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-29)
In Depersonalization Disorder, an advanced Soul incarnates into physical body where the mental component of the inner energy bodies is "detached" from the all the other bodies.
The official definition of Depersonalization Disorder is an "alteration in how an affected individual perceives or experiences their unique sense of self.
This is extremely difficult for the depersonalized individual to do because their personal sense of identity is so deeply ingrained with their mind that their own internal resistance to this process is tremendous and overwhelming.
www.healpastlives.com /pastlf/karmdict/kdepersn.htm   (783 words)

  
 Depersonalization Disorder Treatment, Cause, Symptoms, Medication
Depersonalization disorder is characterized by an unpleasant state of disturbed perception in which external objects or parts of the body are experienced as changed in their quality, unreal, remote, or automatized.
Depersonalization disorder is classified as a dissociative disorder in DSM-IV (though has a separate place in ICD-10).
Depersonalization Disorder is where a person "looks at themselves from the outside", and observes their own physical actions or mental processes as if they were an observer instead of themselves.
www.depression-guide.com /depersonalization-disorder.htm   (694 words)

  
 Derealization and Depersonalization   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-29)
Depersonalization and derealization are both symptoms of an underlying anxiety disorder.
The symptoms of derealization and depersonalization occur due to changes in the levels of chemicals in the blood which alter the perceptions of reality in such a way as to adjust the sufferers perception of themselves and the world around them.
Derealization and Depersonalization are very disturbing symptoms of anxiety, they cause the sufferer to feel frightened and confused, however, both are harmless and transient.
www.anxman.org /depersonalization-derealization.asp   (153 words)

  
 CBC Radio | The Current | Whole Show Blow-by-Blow   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-29)
Depersonalization disorder has been plaguing people and intriguing doctors for decades---because it can be as difficult to diagnose as it is to experience.
Daphne Simeon specializes in Depersonalization Disorder at Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York, where she runs the only clinic in North American devoted to its treatment.
Depersonalization has also been called the "Alice in Wonderland" disease--when a person's world is distorted--small things are big---big things small---and nothing is as it seems.
www.cbc.ca /thecurrent/2005/200502/20050228.html   (1422 words)

  
 Feeling Unreal: A PET Study of Depersonalization Disorder -- Simeon et al. 157 (11): 1782 -- Am J Psychiatry
Depersonalization can be induced in subjects not suffering from
Subjects with depersonalization disorder were matched in a 1:3
df=1, 30, p<0.05), with a tendency for depersonalization
ajp.psychiatryonline.org /cgi/content/full/157/11/1782   (3872 words)

  
 CIGNA - Depersonalization Disorder
Depersonalization disorder is a psychiatric disorder affecting emotions and behavior.
Depersonalization disorder is characterized by persistent or recurring episodes of the loss of the sense of self (depersonalization).
The symptoms of depersonalization disorder are sufficient enough to cause marked distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of life.
www.cigna.com /healthinfo/nord632.html   (996 words)

  
 anxiety and depersonalization
Depersonalization is a person's subjective sense of being unreal, strange, or unfamiliar.
Most people suffering from depersonalization are aware of the disturbance in their sense of reality.
Depersonalization may occur in normal people, secondary to exhaustion, boredom, or sensory deprivation.
www.medhelp.org /forums/mentalhealth/messages/30257a.html   (409 words)

  
 [No title]
Simeon, D found that in a population meeting the DSM-III-R criteria for depersonalization (N=30), the mean age of onset of depersonalization significantly correlated with the mean age of onset of generalized anxiety disorder.
Depersonalization also appeared to be more severe in patients who also suffered from avoidant personality disorder, which lends support to the anxiety theory [1].
Abbas S reports the case of a 21-year-old woman suffering from depersonalization disorder whose moderate depressive symptoms were alleviated with non-SSRI anti-depressants, but whose depersonalization persisted until she was treated with fluoxetine.
www.stwing.upenn.edu /~ariel/spanking/essays/bbb-serotonin.doc   (1285 words)

  
 Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal Axis Dysregulation in Depersonalization Disorder
Conclusions: Primary dissociative conditions, such as depersonalization disorder, may be associated with a pattern of HPA axis dysregulation that differs from PTSD and merits further study.
The goal of this pilot study was to investigate HPA axis function in a primary dissociative disorder, depersonalization disorder (Simeon et al.
Despite the small samples, the power of the test comparing suppression in depersonalized and control subjects was.80 since the effect size, 1.41, was very large (Cohen 1988).
www.nature.com /cgi-taf/dynapage.taf?file=/npp/journal/v25/n5/full/1395731a.html   (1381 words)

  
 My Experience of Depersonalization   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-29)
I am often amazed by what I accomplished in those early years but I was young and strong and hopeful then and had very clear dreams and goals that made me fight harder than I have been able to as an adult.
I then ask, "Imagine if an experience like deja vu never went a way, if that perceptual shift remained for the rest of your life?" Most healthy people have some grasp of that concept and agree that at minimum it would be disturbing and possibly disabling if it persisted.
My derealization and depersonalization levels seem to be in synch with one another, that is they seem to be one disorder.
www.dreamchild.net /mydp.html   (1786 words)

  
 Depersonalization Disorder: Dissociative Disorders: Merck Manual Professional
Depersonalization disorder consists of persistent or recurrent feelings of being detached from one's body or mental processes, usually with a feeling of being an outside observer of one's life.
The experience of depersonalization is common, frequently occurring in connection with life-threatening danger, such as accidents, assaults, and serious illnesses and injuries; it can occur as a symptom in many mental disorders and seizure disorders.
When depersonalization occurs independently of any other mental or physical disorder and is persistent or recurrent, depersonalization disorder is present.
www.merck.com /mmpe/sec15/ch197/ch197b.html   (436 words)

  
 Depersonalization
Before the term was coined in 1898, and under a variety of names, behaviours typical of 'depersonalization' were reported by Esquirol, Zeller, Billod, and Griesinger.
The unclear conceptual boundaries of depersonalization still invite confusion and often enough fragments of what used to be its core-behaviour are used to diagnose the disorder.
Depersonalization has of late become subsumed under the dissociative disorders.
www.biopsychiatry.com /depersonalisation.htm   (201 words)

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