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Topic: Deuterocanonical books


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In the News (Tue 16 Jul 19)

  
  NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Deuterocanonical books
Deuterocanonical books is a term used since the sixteenth century in the Roman Catholic Church and Eastern Christianity to describe certain books and passages of the Christian Bible, in contrast to the "protocanonical books" which are contained in the Hebrew Bible.
The Book of the Jubilees is the narrative of Genesis amplified and embellished by a Jew of the Pharisee period.
the book of...Sirach, and Judith, and Tobias, and the Shepherd are not in the canon.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Deuterocanonical-books   (8335 words)

  
 Scripture Catholic - DEUTEROCANONICAL BOOKS IN THE NEW TESTAMENT
The books Baruch, Tobit, Maccabees, Judith, Sirach, Wisdom and parts of Daniel and Esther were all included in the Septuagint that Jesus and the apostles used.
And of the other historical books, the first and second books of the Kings are among the Hebrews one book; also the third and fourth one book.
There are other books which seem to follow no regular order, and are connected neither with the order of the preceding books nor with one another, such as Job, and Tobias, and Esther, and Judith, and the two books of Maccabees, and the two of Ezra,(ie.
www.scripturecatholic.com /deuterocanon.html   (4881 words)

  
 DEUTEROCANONICAL BOOKS,
For Roman Catholics, the deuterocanonical books of the Old Testament are Judith, the Wisdom of Solomon, Tobit, Sirach (Ecclesiasticus), Baruch, 1 and 2 Maccabees, and certain portions of Esther and Daniel.
The Orthodox church has a similar canon, although it rejects the Book of Baruch and tends to include a third book of Maccabees and a 151st Psalm that appear in some manuscripts of the Greek translation of the Old Testament.
A look at the Book of Jubilees, and the possible explanation of the first humans according to creationism.
www.history.com /encyclopedia.do?articleId=207472   (742 words)

  
 Deuterocanon (Second Canonical Books) - Old Testament - Holy Bible < Saint Takla Haymanot Church's WebSite
These disputed books are referred to as the "deutero-canonical books" by Orthodox and Catholics, and as the "apocryphal books" by Protestants.
It was not, however, till 1546 that these books were solemnly and dogmatically defined as belonging to the canon, because it was not until then that the inspiration of those books was called into question.
Protestants accept the 27 books of the New Testament which were defined by the Councils of Rome, Hippo, Carthage, Florence, and Trent, and yet not the 46 books of the Old Testament defined by the same councils.
st-takla.org /pub_Deuterocanon/Deuterocanon-Apocrypha_El-Asfar_El-Kanoneya_El-Tanya__0-index.html   (4027 words)

  
 Deuterocanonical Books (Apocrypha) quiz -- free game
The heroine of this book pretends to spy against her own people, only to avail herself of the opportunity of decapitating the commander of Nebuchadnezzer's forces.
The Book of Wisdom was written by Solomon.
The Orthodox Church also considers most of the deuterocanonical books to be canonical.
www.funtrivia.com /playquiz/quiz14753110e5830.html   (271 words)

  
 What are the Deuterocanonical Books?
Jerome also counseled that the "deuterocanonical" Old Testament, that is, those books not available in Hebrew or not considered canonical by the Jews, were OK as models of faith and conduct, but should not be used to establish doctrine.
Strictly speaking, the books which are accepted as canonical by some but not all of Christendom are called "Deuterocanonical," and the term "Apocrypha" should be reserved for Old and New Testament writings, such as The Shepherd of Hermas, which have been influential but are not accepted as canonical by any current Christian body.
However, Protestants typically lump the Deuterocanonical Old Testament with truly noncanonical books, as "Old Testament Apocrypha." All of the books in the "Apocrypha" sections of Protestant bibles are accepted as canonical by at least one Christian body dating from before the Reformation.
www.bluffton.edu /~bergerd/deutero.html   (1242 words)

  
 James Akin
Catholics refer to them as the "deuterocanonical" books (since they were disputed by a few early authors and their canonicity was established later than the rest), while the rest are known as the "protocanonical" books (since their canonicity was established first).
Third, by rejecting the deuterocanonicals, Javneh rejected books which had been used by Jesus and the apostles and which were in the edition of the Bible that the apostles used in everyday life—the Septuagint.
The Christian acceptance of the deuterocanonical books was logical because the deuterocanonicals were also included in the Septuagint, the Greek edition of the Old Testament which the apostles used to evangelize the world.
www.ewtn.com /library/ANSWERS/DEUTEROS.HTM   (3964 words)

  
 The Apocrypha Index
In the Roman Catholic Bibles the books are interspersed with the rest of the text.
Jerome rejected the Deuterocanonical books when he was translating the Bible into Latin circa 450 CE, (see the Vulgate).
Of these books, Tobias, Judith, the Wisdom of Solomon, Baruch, and Maccabees, remain in the Catholic Bible.
www.sacred-texts.com /bib/apo/index.htm   (323 words)

  
 RENOVARE - Invitation
The word "Deuterocanonical" simply means "a second canon" and refers to those books written between the time of the Old and New Testaments.
The Deuterocanonical books were part of the ancient Greek Bible, the Septuagint, which was in circulation during the time of Christ.
Of them, Luther wrote, "Apocrypha—that is, books which are not regarded as equal to the holy Scriptures, and yet are profitable and good to read." For this purpose, we have organized the Deuterocanonical books into three categories: Law & History, Writings & Wisdom, and Prophets & Apocalyptic.
www.renovare.org /readings_renovare_bible_rjf_deuterocanonical_letter.htm   (472 words)

  
 deuterocanonical books - Encyclopedia.com
The Book of Tobit: Text, Tradition, Theology; Papers of the First International Conference on the Deuterocanonical Books, Pápa, Hungary, 20-21 May 2004
commonly referred to as the "deuterocanonical books," - that is, books that are not accepted in the...
While the so-called deuterocanonical books are part of Rahlfs' Septuaginta...
www.encyclopedia.com /doc/1E1-X-deuteroc.html   (963 words)

  
 USCCB - Frequently Asked Questions
The Book of Psalms (the Psalter) was revised in 1991.
This terms refers to the seven additional books in the Old Testament (and the additions to two others) that the Catholic Church believes are part of the canon of Scripture inspired by the Holy Spirit.
Epistle: From the Greek word meaning "letter," This word refers to the 21 books in the New Testament that were written as letters to instruct and encourage the members of the early Church.
www.usccb.org /nab/faq.htm   (1375 words)

  
 How to Defend the Deuterocanonicals (This Rock: 0009)
But the seven deuterocanonical books were added at the Council of Trent (1546) in order to justify Catholic doctrinal inventions.
In his writings on the New Testament, he noted that the books of Hebrews, James, Jude, and Revelation were inferior to the rest, and they followed "the certain, main books of the New Testament." In 1519, this same attitude fueled his debate against Johannes Eck on the topic of purgatory.
But the book of Judith says that Nebuchadnezzar was king of the Assyrians, when he was really king of the Babylonians.
www.catholic.com /thisrock/2000/0009sbs.asp   (1523 words)

  
 Apocrypha, Deuterocanonical Books
Some thirteen books comprise the Apocrypha: I and II Esdras, Tobit, Judith, the Rest of Esther, the Wisdom of Solomon, Ecclesiasticus (which is also entitled the Wisdom of Jesus the Son of Sirach), Baruch, the Letter of Jeremiah, the Additions to Daniel, the Prayer of Manasses, and I and II Maccabees.
The Book of Daniel is the one book of the Old Testament to which the non-inspired apocalypses bear the closest affinity, and it evidently furnished ideas to several of the latter.
The Book of the Jubilees is the narrative of Genesis amplified and embellished by a Jew of the Pharisee period.
www.mb-soft.com /believe/txs/apocryph.htm   (20239 words)

  
  Deuterocanonical Books - Search Results - MSN Encarta
Deuterocanonical Books, writings included in the Roman Catholic canon of the Bible, and—with certain exceptions—in the canon of the Orthodox Church,...
Book, a volume of many sheets of paper bound together, containing text, illustrations, music, photographs, or other kinds of information.
A book report is a factual account of a book’s contents.
encarta.msn.com /Deuterocanonical_Books.html   (183 words)

  
 Apocrypha Books
In the Roman Catholic Bibles the books are interspersed with the rest of the text.
Jerome rejected the Deuterocanonical books when he was translating the Bible into Latin circa 450 CE.
There are many other apocryphal books, which do not fall into the 'Deuterocanonical' category, such as the many additional New Testament Gospels, and the apocalyptic book of Enoch.
www.earth-history.com /Apochrypha   (893 words)

  
 Apocrypha, Deuterocanonical Books
Some thirteen books comprise the Apocrypha: I and II Esdras, Tobit, Judith, the Rest of Esther, the Wisdom of Solomon, Ecclesiasticus (which is also entitled the Wisdom of Jesus the Son of Sirach), Baruch, the Letter of Jeremiah, the Additions to Daniel, the Prayer of Manasses, and I and II Maccabees.
The Book of Daniel is the one book of the Old Testament to which the non-inspired apocalypses bear the closest affinity, and it evidently furnished ideas to several of the latter.
The Book of the Jubilees is the narrative of Genesis amplified and embellished by a Jew of the Pharisee period.
mb-soft.com /believe/txs/apocryph.htm   (20239 words)

  
 A Brief History of the Apocrypha
The terms "protocanonical" and "deuterocanonical" are used to signify respectively those books of Scripture that were received by the entire Church from the beginning as inspired, and those whose inspiration came to be recognized later, after the matter had been disputed by certain Fathers and local churches.
The second group of apocryphal books, namely 1 and 2 Esdras, Baruch, Prayer of Manasseh, and the Additions to Daniel, Carlstadt declared to be filled with ridiculous puerilities worthy of the censor's ban, and therefore to be contemptuously discarded.
The reference to "books in their entirety and with all their parts" is intended to cover the Letter of Jeremiah as chapter 6 of Baruch, the Additions to Esther, and the chapters in Daniel concerning the Song of the Three Jews, Susanna, and Bel and the Dragon.
www.gnte.org /ecopub/apocrypha.htm   (5371 words)

  
 BibleGateway.com - Change your Bible Gateway preferences and Bible reading options.
The Deuterocanonical books are a collection of books included in some Bibles but omitted from others.
The reason is that many Christians, particularly in the Protestant tradition, do not consider the books of the Deutrocanon to be canon--that is, they don't consider them to be equal in authority to the other books of the Bible.
We've decided to make the Deuterocanonical versions available to those who want them, but we don't display them by default to avoid confusing readers who aren't accustomed to seeing these "extra" books alongside their familiar Scriptures.
www.biblegateway.com /preferences/deuterocanon.php?previous_searchtype=pref   (227 words)

  
 What are the Apocrypha / Deuterocanonical books?
The word apocrypha means “hidden,” while the word deuterocanonical means “second canon.” The Apocrypha / Deuterocanonicals were written primarily in the time between the Old and New Testaments, as well as additions to the books of Esther and Daniel.
The books are named: 1 Esdras, 2 Esdras, Tobit, Judith, Wisdom of Solomon, Ecclesiasticus, Baruch, the Letter of Jeremiah, Prayer of Manasseh, 1 Maccabees, 2 Maccabees.
The Apocrypha / Deuterocanonicals support some of the things that the Roman Catholic Church believes and practices which are not in agreement with the Bible.
www.gotquestions.org /apocrypha-deuterocanonical.html   (384 words)

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