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Topic: Deuteronomist


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  Deuteronomist - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
He presented the persona of "The Deuteronomist", a single author who was using pre-Exilic material but was editing and writing in the age of exile, the mid 6th century BCE.
The Deuteronomist generally exhibits a stance similar to those of the Jahwist and Elohist, so it may be that the Deuteronomist's work was intended to be read in parallel with JE, rather than instead of it.
In contrast to the priestly source, the Deuteronomist cuts out the obviously pro-Aaronid tales, such as that of Aaron's flowering staff and that of the appointment of the Levites, but includes the story of the Golden Calf, which is the main story from JE that casts Aaron in a negative light.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Deuteronomist   (1492 words)

  
 Deuteronomist info here at en.air-treatment.info   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
The Deuteronomist roundly exhibits a stance same to those of the Jahwist 'n Elohist, so it may be that the Deuteronomist's slogging was aforethought to be construe in parallel with JE, a little than instead of it.
In incongruousness to the priestly source, the Deuteronomist strokes ended the obviously pro-Aaronid tales, such as that of Aaron's flowering staff 'n that of the appointment of the Levites, but has the chestnut of the Golden Calf, which is the central chestnut from JE that casts Aaron in a counteractive light.
The Deuteronomist emphasizes the negativity of the Golden Calf chestnut by incisive ended the tale of the Nehustan (which would cast the effect of a cult doodad in a specific light) 'n that of the heresy of Peor (which would dilute the Golden Calf chestnut by extanting wickedness, alone in which Aaron isn't the villain).
en.air-treatment.info /Deuteronomist   (1721 words)

  
 [No title]
They either have downplayed the Deuteronomist's opposition to the kingship, arguing that he was generally prokingship, or challenged the Wellhausen-Noth analysis in such a way that the door is left open to the type of reassessment that Gerbrandt proposes to do.
Since Deuteronomy and the Deuteronomistic History (and, indeed, all of the OT) continually contrast the nations and Israel, and present these as a temptation and a snare to God's people, Israel's motivation in asking for a king emerges as the problem, not the asking per se or the office per se.
The specific catalyst for Israel's request for a king is usually seen as the Philistine or Ammonite military threats to Israel's existence, based on the statements in 1 Sam 8:20 and 12:12, and on the general visibility of the Philistines and Ammonites throughout 1 Samuel.
www.bethel.edu /~dhoward/articles/GERWTJ3.htm   (5580 words)

  
 Direction: Kings and Chronicles: Interpreting Historical Interpretation
The distinctive interpretations of the writer of Kings (hereafter called the Deuteronomist) and Chronicles (hereafter, the Chronicler) may best be illustrated by a comparative study of Asa’s reign after which the shapes of the larger themes of the Deuteronomist and Chronicler can be described and their meaning for the church explored.
Considerable attention is given to the institutions of prophecy, to the judiciary, and to the constraints laid on the monarchy.
The remaining history, unlike the Deuteronomist’s, is restricted to the Davidic line and the house of Judah.
www.directionjournal.org /article/?430   (4496 words)

  
 Nephi, Wisdom, and the Deuteronomist Reform - FARMS Insights
Biblical scholar Margaret Barker has argued that Judaism was reformed initially in response to the discovery of the "book of the law" (2 Kings 22: 8; 2 Chronicles 34:14) in King Josiah's time (reigned 640-609 B.C.) and later in response to the destruction of the Israelite monarchy and the experience of the exile.
Those reforms were carried out by a priestly group known to scholars as the Deuteronomists, credited with editing the books of Deuteronomy, Joshua, Judges, Samuel, and Kings (to celebrate Josiah and to address aspects of later Jewish history) and leaving a distinct imprint on the Hebrew Bible.
The reform of Josiah/the Deuteronomists, then, reconstructed as best we can from both biblical and non-biblical sources, seems to have been a time when more than pagan accretions were removed from the Jerusalem cult.
farms.byu.edu /display.php?table=insights&id=344   (993 words)

  
 The Deuteronomist De-Christianizing of the Old Testament - FARMS Review (via CobWeb/3.1 planetlab2.isi.jhu.edu)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
The reforming Deuteronomists with their emphasis on history and law have evoked a sympathetic response in many modern scholars who have found there a religion after their own heart.
She finds evidence of this in the efforts of the Deuteronomists and as a result of the interpretations of what is often called the Second Isaiah by biblical scholars.
Interestingly, Friedman argues that Jeremiah was the Deuteronomist.
farms.byu.edu.cob-web.org:8888 /display.php?table=review&id=547   (9732 words)

  
 B498 Old Testament Theology II
In Deuteronomy through Kings the Deuteronomist is at work; and in Ezra, Nehemiah, and 1-2 Chronicles the Chronicler is found.
Solomon made a marriage alliance with Pharaoh king of Egypt; he took Pharaoh's daughter and brought her into the city of David, until he had finished building his own house and the house of the Lord and the wall around Jerusalem.
This is especially true of the central Deuteronomistic tendency to maintain that there is only one legitimate place where Yahweh can be worshipped- the temple in Jerusalem.
www.theology.edu /b498.htm   (3017 words)

  
 [No title]
You should obviously identify the criteria both the Deuteronomist and the modern scholar might use, as well as the source or sources each would use.
Although you do not have to be a geographical determinist to believe geography is a determining factor, for the purpose of this essay pretend that you are.
In a well organized and well written essay, explain who each is, what works they are responsible for, when they wrote (or rather when their works were near their final compilation formed from their theological viewpoints), and what their theological viewpoints were.
crab.rutgers.edu /~verbrugg/essay302.html   (1022 words)

  
 [No title]
The Deuteronomist historian is primarily concerned with creating uniformity and fidelity to Yahweh.
Through her living both as an insider to the covenant of Yahweh and a preserver of her heritage, Jezebel is a unity maker through affirming diversity.
Unlike the Deuteronomist historian, Jezebel affirms diversity as a means to unite.
www.mccchurch.org /oldintranet/api_month_2002_b.htm   (1594 words)

  
 "The Case for Kingship in Deuteronomy and the Former Prophets*" by David M. Howard, Jr.
Thus, by studying the Deuteronomist's assessment of these kings, Gerbrandt has been able to formulate his conclusions concerning the proper functions of the king independently of the debated texts in I Samuel, and then to test these conclusions in the debated texts themselves.
He places the Deuteronomist in Josiah's time, as noted, but he does not see that any of the later additions - which he regards as minor - diverges significantly from the Deuteronomist's positive assessment of kingship (p.
Similarly, Gerbrandt speaks of the "Deuteronomist" to refer to the author of this unified corpus.
www.biblicalstudies.org.uk /article_kingship_howard.html   (7517 words)

  
 Jezebel, Phoenician Queen of Israel   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
According to the Deuteronomist, however, Jezebel's desire is not merely confined to achieving ethnic or religious parity.
Ironically, this is her finest hour, though the Deuteronomist intends the queen to appear haughty and imperious to the end.
When Ahab dies, the Deuteronomist is determined to show that 'there never was anyone like Ahab, who committed himself to doing what was displeasing to the Lord, at the instigation of his wife Jezebel' (1 Kings 21:25).
www.phoenicia.org /jezebel.html   (5230 words)

  
 Asherah by Avi Yan
It is apparent that the deuteronomist regarded Baal-worship as disloyalty to YHWH of the worst kind, and that several times throughout the monarchy there was an attempt to purge the nation of Baal-worship.
While it is obvious that the deuteronomist scorns Asherah worship, it is difficult to decipher the monarchic attitude towards Asherah worship.
In concurrence with the deuteronomistic theological principles, the deuteronomist decries the Asherah cult as morally aberrant, and demonstrates the divine consequences of asherah-worship.
www.adath-shalom.ca /ashera.htm   (2830 words)

  
 [No title]
The Deuteronomist history probably took near-final shape during the reign of King Josiah of Judah (639-609 b.c.), with a small addendum tacked on to cover the brief post-Josiah period leading to the capture of Jerusalem, and some possible additional editing in later years.
For the historian, therefore, the factual reliability of the bible for this period presents a number of difficult problems, not the least of which is the lack of contemporaneous corroborating evidence.
We should note that where the Deuteronomists were concerned with a theology that subjected the king to the word of God, the Chronicles theology saw David as the man chosen by God to forever lead the Israelites.
fontes.lstc.edu /~rklein/Documents/sinsdave.htm   (4138 words)

  
 God Will Circumcise Your Heart for the Sake of Your Life (Deut
Whereas in Genesis God tells Abraham that any of his descendants who do not circumcise their foreskins will be excised and die the Deuteronomist says that they must circumcise the foreskin of their hearts but adds that there will come a time when God will do this for them.
It is interesting that the Deuteronomist relates the life of the Israelite to the circumcision of his heart by God because the penalty for failure to fulfil the commandment of physical circumcision is excision:
God will excise the life of a person who fails to circumcise himself and extend the life of a person who circumcises his heart or whose heart is circumcised by God.
www.imohel.com /physical.htm   (310 words)

  
 T. H. Huxley: The Natural History of Christianity   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
According to the Deuteronomist two covenants were made by Jahveh with his people during their wanderings between Egypt and Palestine, one in Sinai, one in Moab.
And as the time assigned to the publication of the Moabitic law itself was merely the fiction of a writer five or six centuries later, it may [133] be permissible to draw the conclusion which all Jewish history confirms that up to the time of Josiah the Moabitic Law was unknown.
But it is not everybody who has the clear insight of the Deuteronomist into these truths, nor does it lie within the nature of every ruler to be a Philip the Second, while few administrators come up to the standard of Alva or Torquemada:–have neither their courage nor their tenacity of purpose.
aleph0.clarku.edu /huxley/Mss/HistX.html   (14931 words)

  
 Makeup for Quiz #5   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
Imagine that you are the Deuteronomist, living in Gotham City.
B Imagine that you are the Deuteronomist living in the contemporary United States.
Using the structure that the Deuteronomist uses in 1-2 Kings, describe the career of a recent U.S. President.
ccat.sas.upenn.edu /humm/Courses/HebBib/Makeups/hb_m5s03.html   (186 words)

  
 Joshua and Judges: Who Is Israel's God? by Bernard F. Batto - Scripture From Scratch February©2003
The Deuteronomist sought to bolster the sagging faith of the exiles by showing that the problem lay not with God but with God’s people, who had themselves been unfaithful to the covenant.
To the Deuteronomist, by contrast, authentic religion is living wholeheartedly the covenant which God established with Israel through Moses.
The Deuteronomist makes the symbolic point with this story that the land is a gift from God, as God opened up the land for their taking.
www.americancatholic.org /Newsletters/SFS/an0203.asp   (1717 words)

  
 BibleDudes: Biblical Studies: Redaction
The Deuteronomist used written sources, but instead of copying these word-for-word, he interpreted them and added his own spin to make them fit his social, political, and religious agendas.
While the Deuteronomistic History included famous stories about earlier people such as Moses, Samson, and King David, I argued that these stories had a great deal of information about the 6th century BCE, the time in which they were redacted.
You see, the Deuteronomist repeatedly wrote in Judges that Israel would sin at times and be conquered and oppressed by a foreign ruler.
www.bibledudes.com /biblical-studies/redaction.php   (773 words)

  
 deuteronomist - OneLook Dictionary Search
Tip: Click on the first link on a line below to go directly to a page where "deuteronomist" is defined.
Deuteronomist : Encarta® World English Dictionary, North American Edition [home, info]
Deuteronomist : Merriam-Webster's Online Dictionary, 10th Edition [home, info]
www.onelook.com /?w=deuteronomist   (118 words)

  
 Analysis of David and Solomon's Accession Histories
Noth's famous book on the Deuteronomist.[3] David's Accession and Succession Histories were the very foundations of Noth's Deuteronomist.
The "Deuteronomist" of M. Noth became the melting-pot of modern exegesis: the Pentateuch, the Yahwist, the Elohist, Jeremiah, Isaiah, all the prophets, etc., are all the work of the omnipresent Deuteronomist.
Once the Deuteronomistic redaction of Deuteronomy through 2 Kings is recognized (M. Noth), modern authors infer that all the material was written by the Dtr during the exilic/post-exilic time and that it does not contain any recognizable earlier matter.
www.arts.ualberta.ca /JHS/Articles/article3.htm   (1947 words)

  
 Deuteronomist   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
  In the Bible, read about the history of King Josiah and the “discovery” of the Deuteronomistic text in II Kings 22-23.
  Then look at the Deuteronomistic code itself by reading Deuteronomy chapter 5, chapter 6 (the Shema), chapter 15 (the Sabbath Year), chapter 20 (rules on waging war), chapter 30:15-20 (the Deuteronomistic Hypothesis of history), and chapter 34 (the closing narrative of the Pentateuch).
The Deuteronomistic History (the books of Joshua, Judges, 1-II Samuel, I-II Kings) follows the political fortunes of the Israelites over some six hundred years, from the time of the entrance into Canaan until the defeat of the nation under Nebuchadnezzar.
www.stolaf.edu /courses/2004sem1/Religion/121N,P/13Deuteronomist.htm   (265 words)

  
 Deuteronomist   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
The Deuteronomist (D) is one of the sources of the Torah postulated by the documentary hypothesis that treats the texts of Scripture as products of human intellect, working in time.
Passages ascribed to the Deuteronomist in the Torah
The parts of Deuteronomy (no other part of the Torah is usually considered to contain this source) usually identified as Dtr1 are :
deuteronomist.area51.ipupdater.com   (1382 words)

  
 Moses and the Deuteronomist : A Literary Study of the Deuteronomic History : Part 1 : Deuteronomy/Joshua/Judges:Polzin, ...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
Moses and the Deuteronomist : A Literary Study of the Deuteronomic History : Part 1 : Deuteronomy/Joshua/Judges:Polzin, Robert:0253208483:eCampus.com
Samuel and the Deuteronomist: A Literary Study of the Deuteronomic History : I Samuel
David and the Deuteronomist: A Literary Study of the Deuteronomic History, Part 3 : 2 Samuel
www.ecampus.com /bk_detail.asp?isbn=0253208483   (122 words)

  
 RELS 2104 Reading Guide   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
How does the Deuteronomist distinguish between "good kings" and "bad kings"?
Do you remember what the Deuteronomist believes causes "the tragic end" of the kingdom?
Why else were Israel’s kings not good enough for the Deuteronomist?
www.religiousstudies.uncc.edu /karoches/rels2104f05/guide294-305.htm   (196 words)

  
 Documentary Hypothesis   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
It is often difficult to separate J and E stories that have merged.
D (the Deuteronomist) wrote almost all of Deuteronomy (and probably also Joshua, Judges, Samuel, and Kings).
Scholars often associate Deuteronomy with the book found by King Josiah in 622 BCE (see 2 Kings 22).
ccat.sas.upenn.edu /rs/2/Judaism/jepd.html   (466 words)

  
 Why the Deuteronomist Told about the Sacrifice of Jephthah's Daughter -- Janzen 29 (3): 339 -- Journal for the Study of ...
Why the Deuteronomist Told about the Sacrifice of Jephthah's Daughter -- Janzen 29 (3): 339 -- Journal for the Study of the Old Testament
Journal for the Study of the Old Testament, Vol.
Why the Deuteronomist Told about the Sacrifice of Jephthah’s Daughter
jot.sagepub.com /cgi/content/abstract/29/3/339   (166 words)

  
 Dove Booksellers Order Page: Robert M Polzin, David and the Deuteronomist: A Literary Study of the Deuteronomic ...
David and the Deuteronomist: A Literary Study of the Deuteronomic History, Part 3: 2 Samuel
The figure of David is the focus of Polzin's provocative new reading of 2 Samuel.
All trademarks are owned by their respective companies, or Dove Booksellers.
www.dovebook.com /new/bookdesc.asp?BookID=13418   (127 words)

  
 Working Dogs Book Store - Moses and the Deuteronomist: Deuteronomy, Joshua, Judges (A Literary Study of the ...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
Working Dogs Book Store - Moses and the Deuteronomist: Deuteronomy, Joshua, Judges (A Literary Study of the Deuteronomic History, Pt.
Moses and the Deuteronomist: Deuteronomy, Joshua, Judges (A Literary Study of the Deuteronomic History, Pt.
Samuel and the Deuteronomist: A Literary Study of the Deuteronomic History : I Samuel (Indiana Studies in Biblical Literature)
www.workingdogs.com.cob-web.org:8888 /bookstore/us/product/0816422842.htm   (146 words)

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