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Topic: Dewey Decimal Classification


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  Dewey Decimal Classification - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Dewey Decimal Classification (DDC, also called the Dewey Decimal System) is a system of library classification developed by Melvil Dewey in 1876, and since greatly modified and expanded in the course of the twenty-two major revisions, the most recent in 2004.
DDC's cleverness is in choosing decimals for its categories; this allows it to be both purely numerical and infinitely hierarchical.
It also is a faceted classification, combining elements from different parts of the structure to construct a number representing the subject content (often combining two subject elements with linking numbers and geographical and temporal elements) and form of an item rather than drawing upon a list containing each class and its meaning.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Dewey_Decimal_Classification   (1175 words)

  
 Dewey Decimal Classification - FAQ
The Dewey editorial office is located in the Decimal Classification Division of the Library of Congress, where classification specialists annually assign over 110,000 DDC numbers to records for works cataloged by the Library.
Dewey is also used for other purposes, e.g., as a browsing mechanism for resources on the web.
The DDC is built on sound principles that make it ideal as a general knowledge organization tool: meaningful notation in universally recognized Arabic numerals, well-defined categories, well-developed hierarchies, and a rich network of relationships among topics.
staff.oclc.org /~furnerj/dewey.htm   (1058 words)

  
 Universal Decimal Classification - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Universal Decimal Classification is a system of library classification developed by the Belgian bibliographers Paul Otlet and Henri la Fontaine at the end of the 19th century.
It is based on the Dewey Decimal Classification, but is much more powerful.
UDC classifications use Hindu-Arabic numerals and are based on the decimal system.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Universal_Decimal_Classification   (404 words)

  
 Dewey Decimal Classification   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The Dewey Decimal Classification was invented in 1873 by Melvil Dewey and published in 1876, being expanded in subsequent publications.
The Dewey Decimal Classification (DDC, or "Dewey") operates in positions of tens, with the first number classes, the second divisions and the third sections.
The hierarchy of classification is by discipline for which the work is intended, not by topic (or subject).
www.change.freeuk.com /learning/concepts/dewey.html   (1021 words)

  
 Dewey Decimal Classification
The classification is mainly made by subjects or content regardless of form; but it is found practically useful to make an additional distinction in these general treatises, according to the form of treatment adopted.
Practically, it is desirable that the classification be as minute as possible without the use of additional figures, and the decimal principle on which our scheme hinges allows nine divisions as readily as a less number.
Therefore the Roman numerals, capitals and small letters, and similar symbols usually found in systems of classification are entirely discarded and by the exclusive use of Arabic numerals in their regular order throughout the shelves, classifications, indexes, catalogues and records, there is secured the greatest accuracy, economy, and convenience.
www.davidgalbraith.org /dewey.html   (4093 words)

  
 Library - Dewey Decimal Classification System
Although the DDC is the most widely used classification system in the world, it is most commonly found in public libraries and in curriculum collections.
The DDC is divided into ten main classes, organized by disciplines or fields of study.
A call number in the Dewey Decimal System is read much like an LC call number, except for the fact that it does not begin with a set of letters.
library.wcsu.edu /web/assistance/guides/a_locating/dewey   (672 words)

  
 Dewey Decimal Classification : Introduction to the Dewey Decimal Classification
The Dewey Decimal Classification is the most widely used classification system in the world.
Libraries in more than 135 countries use the DDC to organize and provide access to their collections, and DDC numbers are featured in the national bibliographies of sixty countries.
Entries in the schedules and tables are composed of a DDC number in the number column (the column at the left margin), a heading describing the class that the number represents, and often one or more notes.
www.glib.hcmuns.edu.vn /elib/ddc/onlineddc/about_the_ddc.htm   (1613 words)

  
 Dewey Decimal Classification
The Dewey Decimal Classification (DDC, also called the Dewey Decimal System) is a system of library classification developed by Melvil Dewey (1851-1931) in 1876, and since greatly modified and expanded in the course of twenty major revisions.
DDC's cleverness is in choosing decimals for its categories; this allows it to be both purely numerical while infinitely hierarchical.
DDC is commonly used in public and school libraries throughout the world, and especially the U.S. The schedule contains marked geographical biases derived from its 19th century origins: Northern Africa for instance occupies all of 961-965, the rest of the continent only 966-969.
www.knowledgefun.com /book/d/de/dewey_decimal_classification.html   (561 words)

  
 Melvil Dewey and Dewey Decimal Classification   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Dewey wanted to create a system of classification that was simple enough for even casual users to understand, but complex enough to meet libraries' expanding needs.
Dewey felt that the Library of Congress should be expanded to act as a true national library.
Today, the Dewey Decimal Classification is in its 20th edition and is still used in many small public and school libraries.
www.amybmccurdy.com /dewey.html   (457 words)

  
 Dewey Decimal Classification - LISWiki
It was created by librarian Melville Dewey in the 1870s and has been owned by OCLC since 1988.
Dewey Decimal call numbers begin with Arabic numerals.
In the United States, most school and public libraries use Dewey Decimal classification, but most research and academic libraries use Library of Congress classification.
liswiki.org /wiki/DDC   (107 words)

  
 The Dewey Decimal Classification System
The purpose of this lesson is to teach students about the fundamentals of the Dewey Decimal System to enable them to locate books in the library.
The Dewey Decimal Classification System is the most widely used method for classifying books in the library.
The Dewey Decimal Classification System is used in most Public School libraries.
www.iit.edu /~halsey/lesson1.htm   (774 words)

  
 Dewey Decimal Classification System   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Each of these categories is further broken down to the 1's and topics that are the most specific have classifications using decimals.
The Dewey Decimal System has been revised many times in the past 150 years, taking into account new areas of study and discovery.
Dewey Decimal System: A Guide to Call Numbers provides a detailed look at all 1000 numbers, 000-999, and the subjects they represent.
www.library.mhc.edu /research/dewey.htm   (149 words)

  
 The Dewey Decimal Classification System
It was invented by a man named Melville Louis Kossuth Dewey when he was 21 years old, working as a student assistant in a college library.
Dewey is credited with beginning the field of library science in the United States.
Dewey's system of cataloguing books is used today in most local and school libraries.
www.evgschool.org /dewey_decimal_classification_sys.htm   (247 words)

  
 Paper: Cultural and Religious Problems in Dewey Decimal Classification   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Sardar's scheme resembles Elazar's system for classification in that the emphasis is on the influence of its religious and cultural aspects on its body of knowledge.
Momeni cites Meena Krishnaswami, who writes, "Since the Dewey Decimal scheme was primarily meant for the Protestant American culture and people, it is proposed that the numbers provided for America be utilized for India and the numbers provided for India be used for America" [450].
The DDC classification of 296 for Judaica would be appended with the Elazar classification, allowing depth of specificity.
home.usit.net /~cbmorgan/jcpap.htm   (2273 words)

  
 Melvil Dewey and the Dewey Decimal Classification System
Melville Louis Kossuth Dewey, the youngest of five children, was born on December 10, 1851, in a small town in northern New York.
In most libraries the Dewey number and the first one, two or three letters of the author's last name become the book's call number, or its address on the library shelves.
The Dewey Decimal Classification System is the most widely used classification system in the world.
www.homeschoollearning.com /hsc/unit_09-10-01.html   (1204 words)

  
 Dewey Decimal Classification
This corresponds with the WorldCat DDC for the 2000 reprint of the etchings; clearly they considered the etchings primary.
Trying to decode the --763 failed; the local reference librarian thinks it was because of the age of the DDC I was using.
Dewey, M. (1971) Dewey decimal classification and relative index.
www.hray.com /5703/a3/ddc.htm   (392 words)

  
 Concept
First published in 1876, the Dewey Decimal Classification (DDC) divides knowledge into ten main classes, with further subdivisions.
Its simple and logical framework is based on the principle of decimal fractions as class marks, which are expandable to make further subdivisions.
Each of the 10 guestrooms floors honors one of the 10 categories of the DDC and each of the 60 rooms is uniquely adorned with a collection of books and art exploring a distinctive topic within the category or floor it belongs to.
www.libraryhotel.com /concept.htm   (137 words)

  
 Dewey services [OCLC - Cataloging and Metadata]
The 22nd edition of the DDC enhances the efficiency and accuracy of your classification work in ways no previous editions have done.
See for yourself how the DDC organizes library collections, learn more about its history and peruse a bibliography of resources in an introduction to the DDC.
Dewey, Dewey Decimal Classification, DDC, OCLC and WebDewey are registered trademarks of OCLC.
www.oclc.org /dewey   (412 words)

  
 Dewey Decimal Classification
In this case the 301 is the main class for Sociology and Anthropology.
The decimal point is followed by numbers to indicate sub-divisions of the main class.
In this case the 412 indicates that the subject of the book is "women".
www.ru.ac.za /library/infolit/dew3.html   (179 words)

  
 IPL Youth Collection: The Dewey Decimal Classification System
You will see that there are 10 basic categories in the Dewey Decimal system, and each of those categories is further split into 10 categories, and so on.
Today, many libraries still use the Dewey Decimal system, even though they might have things like videotapes, compact discs (CDs), and computer files as well as books in their collections.
The Dewey system still reflects that old outlook because it would be very hard for libraries to completely change how they are organized.
www.ipl.org.ar /youth/dewey/dewey.html   (340 words)

  
 Dewey Decimal Classification System   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Most library users know the general structure of Melvil Dewey's decimal classification.
First published in 1876, the Dewey Decimal Classification divides knowledge into ten main classes, with further subdivisions.
More than 200,000 libraries in 135 countries use the DDC to organize their collections.
www.westirondequoit.org /rogers/library/DDC.htm   (92 words)

  
 The Dewey Decimal Classification System
Dewey Decimal Classification System developed by Melville Dewey.
If a lot of books are on the same subject and they have the same classification number, three letters are added to this number.
When you use a large university or research library, books may be classified according to the Library of Congress Classification System.
www.hewett.norfolk.sch.uk /common/library/dewey/dewey2.htm   (197 words)

  
 Dewey Decimal Classification System
Books in the library are arranged on the shelves according to the Dewey Decimal Classification System (developed by Melville Dewey).
Materials which are too general to belong to a specific group (encyclopedias, newspapers, magazines, etc.) are placed in the 000's.
Decimals are read from the 10's place to the thousand's place.
www.usd320.k12.ks.us /whs/lmc/Dewey.html   (505 words)

  
 Dewey Decimal Classification   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
These three numbers are always on the left of the decimal point in the call number.
There is no set amount of numbers that need to be to the right of the decimal point.
These numbers determine how specific the classification is. Click on a class to learn more about it, and to see how it is subdivided even further.
library.brynmawrschool.org /dewey.htm   (666 words)

  
 About DDC [OCLC - Dewey services]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The Dewey Decimal Classification (DDC) system, devised by library pioneer Melvil Dewey in the 1870s and owned by OCLC since 1988, provides a dynamic structure for the organization of library collections.
Now in its 22nd edition, and available in print and Web versions, the DDC is the world’s most widely used library classification system.
The four-volume print edition of DDC 22 was published in July 2003.
www.oclc.org /dewey/about/about_the_ddc.htm   (358 words)

  
 How to Use the Dewey Decimal System
The Dewey Decimal System organizes information into 10 broad areas, which are broken into smaller and smaller topics.
To see what books the library currently has in on animals, go to the nonfiction shelves and find the books that have a 599 as part of their call number.
You can learn more about the Dewey Decimal System and how it works in the book The Dewey Decimal System by Allan Fowler.
www.monroe.lib.in.us /childrens/ddchow.html   (211 words)

  
 Dewey Decimal Classification   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Call numbers in the Dewey Decimal Classification (Dewey) are evaluated one line at a time from top to bottom.
Note that 801.3 is considered a "larger" number than 801.125 in decimal ordering.
Once the 801.25 section of books is found, next narrow the search by further evaluating the second line of the call number.
web.uflib.ufl.edu /afa/toolbox/dewey.html   (274 words)

  
 Dewey Decimal Classification System - FCPL   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The Dewey Decimal Classification System is used by libraries to organize their collections by subject.
Main subjects are given a three-digit number: 200, 300, etc., and then further broken down into sub-categories: 220, 230, 240, etc. Subdivisions of the sub-categories are shown by numbers after a decimal point: 220.550, 350.90, etc.
Following is a list of the subjects and some of the subdivisions used in the Dewey Decimal System.
www.fairfaxcounty.gov /library/dewey.htm   (69 words)

  
 CyberDewey
The Dewey Decimal Classification is comprised of 10 Classes (Generalities, Philosophy, Religion, Social Science, Language, Natural Science, Technology, Art, Literature, and History).
My article Organizing Computer Resources tells the tortuous path I followed before discovering that Dewey is a robust, general-purpose way to organize just about anything.
The FAQ contains pointers to other Dewey resources, some suggestions for using Dewey, and a status report.
www.anthus.com /CyberDewey/CyberDewey.html   (173 words)

  
 Dewey Decimal Classification
Melvil Dewey is the inventor of the Dewey Decimal System of Classification, which is used in most local and school libraries to catalogue books.
Devised in 1876 as a system for small libraries, the system is based on ten classes of subject (000-999), which are then further subdivided.
The Dewey system has ten main classes, which are listed below.
cfbstaff.cfbisd.edu /librarysheffieldint/dewey.html   (68 words)

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