Factbites
 Where results make sense
About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   PR   |   Contact us  

Topic: Diadumenianus


Related Topics

In the News (Fri 19 Jul 19)

  
  Diadumenian - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Marcus Opellius Antoninus Diadumenianus or Diadumenian, Roman Caesar (junior emperor), died 218 A.D. was the son of Emperor Macrinus who served his father briefly as Caesar (junior emperor) from May, 217 to 218 A.D. and as Augustus in 218.
Diadumenian was declared to be co-ruler by his father in 218, during the Severan Dynasty, where he is remembered by the name Diadumenianus.
His head was cut off and presented to Elagabalus as a trophy.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Diadumenian   (242 words)

  
 Macrinus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Macrinus managed to escape and sent Diadumenianus as an ambassador to the Persian court.
He was heading to Rome to secure the city for his cause but was caught in Asia Minor and executed for usurping the crown.
Diadumenianus would suffer the same fate at the hands of the Persians.
www.encyclopedia-online.info /Macrinus   (488 words)

  
 DIADUMENIANUS   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Marcus Opellius Antoninus Diadumenianus was zeer korststondig (23 dagen) Romeins keizer in het jaar 218.
Hij was slechts 8 jaar oud toen hij in april 217 tot Caesar (onderkeizer of kroonprins) werd benoemd en diende onder zijn vader Macrinus.
Macrinus heeft nog geprobeerd zijn 10-jarig zoontje in veiligheid te stellen voordat hij noordwaarts vluchtte, maar Diadumenianus werd gevangen genomen en later in juni gedood.
www.thumpershollow.com /encyclopedia/D/Diadumenianus   (149 words)

  
 Marcus Opellius Macrinus
The boy was called Diadumenianus because he had been born with a caul, but now it seemed as if he had been destined by the gods to become ruler of the world, because the diadem was the attribute of royalty.
Diadumenianus fled to the Euphrates but was killed, "having gained nothing from the imperial power but his death at the hands of the soldiers", as the author of the Historia Augusta summarizes.
Macrinus himself escaped from the battlefield and fled to Rome, hoping to gain support from the Senate and the people, but he was seized in Chalcedon in Bithynia by Aurelius Celsus and taken to Cappadocia, where he was decapitated by Marcianus Taurus.
www.livius.org /on-oz/opellius/macrinus.html   (2156 words)

  
 Roman Emperors - DIR Macrinus
Despite the inexperience of the leaders of the rebel army, Macrinus was defeated.
He sent his son, Diadumenianus, with an ambassador to the Parthian king, while Macrinus himself prepared to flee to Rome.
Diadumenianus had also been captured (at Zeugma) and was similarly put to death.
www.roman-emperors.org /macrinus.htm   (963 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Macrinus   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
The elaborate symbolism of this coin celebrates Macrinus and his son Diadumenianus, and their prodigality (Liberalitas).
Macrinus also nominated his son Diadumenianus Caesar and successor and conferred upon him the name "Antoninus", thus connecting him with the relatively stable reigns of the Antonine emperors of the 2nd century.
His son Diadumenianus, sent for safety to the Parthian court, was captured at Zeugma and also put to death.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Macrinus   (2264 words)

  
 Historia Augusta • Life of Macrinus
For by bribing the imperial equerry and holding out great hopes, he caused the report to spread that the Emperor was killed by a conspiracy of the soldiers, because he had incurred their displeasure through his fratricide or his incest.
It is of interest to know what manner of oration that was in which he cleared himself when writing to the senate, for thus his shamelessness may be understood, and the sacrilege with which this evil emperor began his reign.
Likewise, farther on: "To my son Diadumenianus, who is known to you, the soldiers have given both the imperial power and the name — for they have called him Antoninus — that he might be honoured, first with this name, but also with the office of monarch.
penelope.uchicago.edu /Thayer/E/Roman/Texts/Historia_Augusta/Macrinus*.html   (4586 words)

  
 Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology, page 996 (v. 1)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
DIADUMENIANUS or DIADUMENUS, M. OPE'LIUS, the son of M. Opelius Macrinus and Nonia Celsa, was born on the 19th of Septem* ber, a.
When his father was elevated to the purple, after the murder of Caracalla on tho 8th of March, a.
217, Diadumenianus received the titles of Caesar, Princeps Juventutis^ Antoninus^ and eventually of Imperator and Augustus also,, Upon the victory of Elagabalus, he was sent to the charge of Artabanus, the Parthian king, but was betrayed and put to death about the same time with Macrinus.
www.ancientlibrary.com /smith-bio/1002.html   (793 words)

  
 R1481
Macrinus tried to strengthen his position by raising his 9-year-old son Diadumenianus to the rank of Augustus, using this as a pretext for distributing money to the troops to win back their favour.
This failed to stem the tide of desertions, and he was forced to flee to Antioch.
His son, Diadumenianus, was captured at Zeugma on the Syrian frontier (and killed?).
www.forumancientcoins.com /historia/coins/r4/r1481.htm   (305 words)

  
 Talk: Diadumenian - Open Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
My printed sources seem to prefer "Diadumenianus", while "Diadumenian" is apparently what coin collectors use, and so it has many more Google hits.
Most of my texts refer to him as "Diadumenianus" when he was co-emperor.
Our rule is to use the "most common" name that is still correct, thus Livy and Bill Clinton, with redirs from Titus Livius and William Jefferson Clinton.
talk.open-encyclopedia.com /Diadumenian   (215 words)

  
 Macrinus   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Therebellion started on May 15 and on June 8 of218, Macrinus' troops were defeated in battle.
Macrinus managed to escape and sent Diadumenianus as an ambassador to the Persiancourt.
He was heading to Rome to secure the city for his cause but was caught in Asia Minor and executed for usurping the crown.Diadumenianus would suffer the same fate at the hands of the Persians.
www.therfcc.org /macrinus-63075.html   (453 words)

  
 Roman Emperor Info - Bored Net - Boredom   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Although Macrinus and Diadumenianus are listed here as non-dynastic, this is somewhat misleading; Macrinus was Diadumenianus's father.
Macrinus was praetorian prefect (praefectus praetorio) under "Caracalla", whom he may have conspired to murder in April 217.
His wife Nonia Celsa bore him a son, Diadumenianus, whom he made co-Emperor in 218; both were executed by partisans of "Elagabalus" (see below).
www.borednet.com /e/n/encyclopedia/r/ro/roman_emperor_1.html   (3693 words)

  
 Opellius Macrinus (217 - 218 AD)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Proclamation of Diadumenianus (son of Macrinus) as Caesar (217)
He also says that he reduced the pay of soldiers who entered the army, though he did not reduce the pay of those already in it, suggesting that Macrinus was worried about imperial finance.
In his defense, it must be noted that he had inherited a difficult situation on the eastern frontier from Caracalla, and he appears to have been respectful of the family of Severus, which had taken up residence at Emesa (where Julia Domna, Severus' wife, was born).
www.umich.edu /~classics/programs/class/cc/372/sibyl/en/Macrinus.html   (438 words)

  
 Severan dynasty -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Macrinus managed to escape to Chalcedon but his authority was lost: he was betrayed and executed after a short reign of just 14 months.
Opelius Diadumenianus was the son of (additional info and facts about Macrinus) Macrinus, born in 208.
He was given the title Caesar in 217, when his father became Emperor.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/s/se/severan_dynasty.htm   (985 words)

  
 Cassius Dio Roman History Epitome of Book 79
And although they did not apply to Tarautas the name of public enemy, they were forever shouting that Martialis ought to be honoured with encomiums and with statues — taking as their pretext the similarity of his name to that of Mars.
But presently they learned that Aurelianus was dead and that Diadumenianus, the son of Macrinus, had been appointed Caesar, — nominally by the soldiers, through whose ranks he passed when summoned from Antioch to meet his father, but really by Macrinus, —; and had also taken the name of Antoninus.
In particular, he constantly called himself "father" and Diadumenianus his "son," and kept holding up to reproach the youth of the False Antoninus, though he had appointed as emperor his own son, who was much younger.
www.brainfly.net /html/books/diocas79.htm   (5921 words)

  
 [No title]
They were less concerned about whose slaves they should be next than about whose yoke they had shaken off, and were impressed with the idea that any chance comer who might present himself would be preferable to their former master.
For these two now regarded Macrinus and Diadumenianus as henceforth absolutely non-existent and trampled upon their claims as though they were already dead.
Such was the state of these [Sidenote:--38--] affairs; and, by Jupiter, when he sent word about the uprising of the False Antoninus, the consuls uttered certain formulae against him, as is regularly done under such circumstances, and one of the praetors and another of the tribunes did the same.
www.gutenberg.net /1/2/0/6/12061/12061.txt   (15663 words)

  
 Elagabalus - Wikiquote
He undertook to disparage my age, when he himself had appointed his five-year-old son.
Referring to the Emperor Macrinus and his declaration of his son Diadumenianus to be '"Ceasar".
The head of Diadumenianus was presented to Elagabalus as a trophy.
en.wikiquote.org /wiki/Elagabalus   (190 words)

  
 Chapter Death Of Severus, Tyranny Of Caracalla, Usurpation Of Marcinus. of History of The Decline And Fall of The Roman ...
They cast their eyes around in search of a competitor, and at last yielded with reluctance to his promises of unbounded liberality and indulgence.
A short time after his accession, he conferred on his son Diadumenianus, at the age of only ten years, the Imperial title, and the popular name of Antoninus.
The beautiful figure of the youth, assisted by an additional donative, for which the ceremony furnished a pretext, might attract, it was hoped, the favor of the army, and secure the doubtful throne of Macrinus.
www.bibliomania.com /2/1/62/109/25648/6.html   (785 words)

  
 Dio's Rome, Vol VI. - An Historical Narrative Originally Composed In Greek During The - Reigns Of Septimius Severus, ...
Such was the state of these [Sidenote:—­38—­] affairs; and, by Jupiter, when he sent word about the uprising of the False Antoninus, the consuls uttered certain formulae against him, as is regularly done under such circumstances, and one of the praetors and another of the tribunes did the same.
For the conversation he had had with the soldiers was read aloud.] As a result of this, we all condemned still more strongly his abasement and folly.
[For one thing] he was most constantly calling himself “father” and Diadumenianus his “son,” and he kept holding up to reproach the age of the False Antoninus, though he had designated as emperor his son, who was much younger.
www.bookrags.com /ebooks/12061/42.html   (510 words)

  
 Lampridius: The Life of Heliogabalus
Now when Macrinus had been slain and also his son Diadumenianus, who had been given an equal share of the power and also the name Antoninus, the imperial office was bestowed upon Varius Elagabalus, solely because he was reputed to be the son of Bassianus.
When he entered upon his consulship he threw presents to the populace to be scrambled for, no mere pieces of silver and gold, indeed, or confectionery or little animals, but fatted cattle and camels and asses and slaves, declaring that this was an imperial custom.
He made a savage attack on the memory of Macrinus and a still more savage one on that of Diadumenianus because he had received the name Antoninus -- he called him a "Pseudo-Antoninus" -- and because it was asserted that from a veritable profligate he had become very brave and honourable and dignified and austere.
members.aol.com /heliogabby/bio/eng.htm   (10331 words)

  
 Free-TermPapers.com - Marcus Opellius Macrinus
He declared his son, Diadumenianus emperor, to try to win back some support, but it failed.
He sent his 10 year old son, Diadumenianus with an ambassador, to the Parthian king.
Macrinus shaved his beard and in a disguise tried to make his way back to Rome, he was nearly there when he was found.
www.free-termpapers.com /tp/38/rcj267.shtml   (467 words)

  
 Diadumenianus koloniale stadsmunt diassaria kz. Thanathos ae 17   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Afgaand op het portret alleen zou ik niet onmiddelijk zeggen, deze keizer.
Die K kan er zeker staan, maar op deze munt is er voor deze "K" ook nog iets te zien.
Achter de keizernaam volgt niets (in dat geval N resp C als laatste letter dus), of de titel CAES, AVG of AV.
www.muntstukken.be /forum/index.php?topic=13089.new#new   (724 words)

  
 Roman Emperor Diadumenian 217-218 AD **Very Rare** for sale - TradeMe.co.nz - New Zealand   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Macrinus became Emperor on April 11, 217, after he had Caracalla assassinated while both were engaged in a campaign against Parthia.
Diadumenianus was immediately named Caesar, but a shameful peace with Parthia and a rebellion instigated by Julia Maesa on behalf of her grandson Elagabalus quickly led to the overthrow of Macrinus.
Diadumenianus was named Augustus just weeks before he and his father were captured and executed at Antioch by soldiers of Elagabalus (June, 218).
www.trademe.co.nz /Stamps-coins/Coins/Ancient/auction-35389589.htm   (301 words)

  
 geta products at MSN Shopping   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Given the paucity of ancient accounts of the Antonine period, it is fortunate that the more reliable parts of this collection include the biographies of Antoninus Pius and Marcus Aurelius (in Volume I).
Scriptores Historiae Augustae: Caracalla, Geta, Opellius Macrinus, Diadumenianus, Elagabalus, Severus...
Not All Okies Are White: The Lives of Black Cotton Pickers in Arizona
shopping.msn.com /results/shp?bcatid=4,ptnrid=8,text=geta,ptnrdata=1   (423 words)

  
 [No title]
[Sidenote:--19--] However, they soon learned that Aurelianus was dead and that Diadumenianus, son of Macrinus, had been appointed Cæsar.
And he had not written even his name in the preface of the letter, though he termed him Cæsar and emperor and indicated that the contents emanated from them both.
Such was the state of these [Sidenote:--38--] affairs; and, by Jupiter, when he sent word about the uprising of the False Antoninus, the consuls uttered certain formulæ against him, as is regularly done under such circumstances, and one of the prætors and another of the tribunes did the same.
www.gutenberg.net /1/2/0/6/12061/12061-8.txt   (15668 words)

  
 Elagabalus (218 - 222 AD)
On May 16, 218, Bassianus was taken to the camp of legio III Gallica and proclaimed emperor, taking the name Marcus Aurelius Antoninus (he is usually called Elagabalus, after the god whom he worshipped).
Upon hearing of the proclamation of Elagabalus, and the failure of the legate of III Gallica to retake the camp, Macrinus, who had traveled to Apamea to garner support from legio II Parthica, proclaimed his son Diadumenianus as co-emperor.
On June 8, the armies of Macrinus and Elagabalus met in battle near Antioch.
www.umich.edu /~classics/programs/class/cc/372/sibyl/en/Elagabalus.html   (748 words)

  
 Bryn Mawr Classical Review 1999.04.02
There have been important developments in the study of the Historia Augusta during the last decade.
A Budé edition has been undertaken under the general direction of J.-P. Callu, which now extends to three volumes that give us the lives of Hadrian, Aelius Caesar and Antoninus Pius in the first, of Macrinus, Diadumenianus and Elagabalus in the second, Aurelian and Tacitus in the third (edited by Paschoud).
With generous commentary, and extensive polemical introductions, this project threatens the budget of any classicist.
ccat.sas.upenn.edu /bmcr/1999/1999-04-02.html   (1002 words)

Try your search on: Qwika (all wikis)

Factbites
  About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   Press   |   Contact us  
Copyright © 2005-2007 www.factbites.com Usage implies agreement with terms.