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Topic: Diffusion anthropology


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In the News (Mon 18 Mar 19)

  
  Diffusion (anthropology) Totally Explained
The term 'diffusion' or diffusionism is used in cultural anthropology to describe the spread of cultural items — such as ideas,, religions, technologies, etc. — between individuals, whether within a single culture or from one culture to another.
An example of such disputes is the proposal by Thor Heyerdahl that similarities between the culture of Polynesia and the pre-Columbian civilizations of the Andes are due to diffusion from the latter to the former — a theory that currently has few supporters among professional anthropologists.
Those disputed are fueled in part by the overuse of cultural diffusion, starting in the late 19th century, as a blanket explanation for all similarities between widely dispersed cultures.
diffusion__anthropology.totallyexplained.com   (1017 words)

  
  Diffusion (anthropology) Encyclopedia
The term 'diffusion' or diffusionism is used in cultural anthropology to describe the spread of cultural items — such as ideas, styles, religions, technologies, etc. — between individuals, whether within a single culture or from one culture to another.
For example, the practice of agriculture is widely believed to have diffused from somewhere in the Middle East to all of Eurasia, less than 10,000 years ago, having been adopted by many pre-existing cultures.
Those disputed are fueled in part by the overuse of cultural diffusion, starting in the late 19th century, as a blanket explanation for all similarities between widely dispersed cultures.
www.hallencyclopedia.com /topic/Diffusion_(anthropology).html   (1000 words)

  
 Diffusion (anthropology) - Education - Information - Educational Resources - Encyclopedia - Music
The diffusion of ideas or artifacts from one culture to another is a well-attested and uncontroversial concept of cultural anthropology.
Although migration is responsible for the mechanism of diffusion, diffusion does not actually occur until the culture practice is adopted the new group.
Those disputed are fueled in part by the overuse of diffusion, starting in the late 19th century, as an explanation for all similarities between widely dispersed cultures.
www.music.us /education/D/Diffusion-(anthropology).htm   (616 words)

  
 Diffusion (anthropology) - Facts, Information, and Encyclopedia Reference article
The diffusion of ideas or artifacts from one culture to another is a well-attested and uncontroversial concept of cultural anthropology.
For example, the practice of agriculture is widely believed to have diffused from somewhere in the Middle East to all of Eurasia, less than 10,000 years ago.
Everett Rogers proved that, for diffusion of innovations, people consider awareness, interest, evaluation, trial, and adoption, and are influenced by change agents and opinion leaders.
www.startsurfing.com /encyclopedia/d/i/f/Diffusion_(anthropology).html   (329 words)

  
 Diffusion (anthropology)
The diffusion of ideas or artifacts from one culture to another is a well-attested and uncontroversial concept of cultural anthropology.
For example, the practice of agriculture is widely believed to have diffused from somewhere in the Middle East to all of Eurasia, less than 10,000 years ago.
Everett Rogers proved that, for diffusion of innovations, people consider awareness, interest, evaluation, trial, and adoption, and are influenced by change agents and opinion leaders.
abcworld.net /Diffusion_(anthropology).html   (320 words)

  
 Anthropology Resources on the Internet
Ant-Bra -- The E-Forum of Anthropology of/in Brazil
The Institute for Development Anthropology (IDA) is an independent, nonpartisan, nonprofit research and educational institution that engages in envrionmentally sustainable development through equitable economic growth and respect for human rights.
World Council of Anthropology Associations - is a network of national and international associations that aims to promote worldwide communication and cooperation in anthropology.
www.aaanet.org /resinet.htm   (2326 words)

  
 V-cones of Diffusion
Theories of the birth of civilization, such as Toynbee’s consideration of challenge and response and many others, are confounded by the relativity of the term ‘civilization’ and the clear evidence of its gestation, if not outright early appearance as ‘civil evolution’, in the primordial transition, village, town, state.
This emergence of higher civilization, as a relative onset, is highly concentrated in the Fertile Crescent, and we suspect, despite every possibility of the independent emergence of the discovery of agriculture, that the appearance of advanced civilizations occurs uniquely in one source.
This is out of the master sequence, and shows diffusion and sequential dependency on the first phase, the transition of Sumer and Egypt, mediated via the mideonic world of the Minoan.
history-and-evolution.com /2nd/chapfive5_8_5.htm   (1790 words)

  
 diffusionism - Search Results - MSN Encarta
Racist and ethnocentric theories of cultural evolution fell out of favor with most anthropologists in the early 20th century.
Department of Anthropology College of Arts and Sciences The University of Alabama.
The term ' diffusion' or diffusionism is used in cultural anthropology to describe the spread of cultural items — such as ideas, styles, religions, technologies, etc. — between individuals...
encarta.msn.com /diffusionism.html   (170 words)

  
  Online Encyclopedia and Dictionary - Culture
Diffusion of innovations theory presents a research-based model for how, when and why people adopt new ideas.
In diffusion (anthropology), the form of something moves from one culture to another, but not its meaning.
Diffusions of innovations theory presents a research-based model for why and when individuals and cultures adopt new ideas, practices, and products.
www.fact-archive.com /encyclopedia/Culture   (2297 words)

  
 DIFFUSION OF INNOVATION
Diffusion is the process by which innovations spread from one locale or one social group to another.
The study focused on the diffusion and adoption of a new type of corn seed to be planted in Iowa fields.
When studying the diffusion of innovations it is important to understand that you are not just looking at the spread of an innovation through a society but rather the spread of different kinds of innovations through a society.
www.ciadvertising.org /studies/student/99_fall/theory/millman/Diffusion.htm   (3211 words)

  
 Public Anthropology
The term “scientific racism” describes a position founded on 19th century anthropology and pejoratively charged by the Nazis and fascists with a predilection to eugenics; this position contends that the Negro race is subordinate to the white race in biological capacity.
The apparent diffusion rate, measured by the distance reached by a given trait in a given time, will be essentially constant in Neolithic time, that is, will approximate the real diffusion rate of the model” and, “2.
To his credit, he does realize that at this period of time in anthropology there is a serious lack of comprehensive radiocarbon dates from a majority of the sites he utilizes for data; therefore future improvements will most likely yield a different mean rate of diffusion, and thus a more accurate representation.
www.publicanthropology.org /Archive/Ca1961.htm   (8089 words)

  
 Diffusion
A special form of stimulus diffusion, which usually involves behavior as well as ideas, is proselytism, or the deliberate dissemination of beliefs.
In the field of mythology, one of the strongest advocates of the Diffusionist School of interpretation was folklorist Fitzroy Somerset, Lord Raglan, who argued that the transmission of traditional narratives is overwhelmingly imitative and that invention of such narratives is minimal (Somerset 1965).
When diffused, each invention has to be, to some extent, reinvented in the minds of the receivers.
www.neara.org /topics/diffuse.htm   (3545 words)

  
 Anthropology   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Anthropology is the study of what it means to be human.
An anthropology of mass media generally falls under the rubric of cultural anthropology, although studies of media as material culture also exist as do linguistic analysis of media texts.
The anthropology of the media is interested in how media producers put together their texts, negotiating authorship with appeals to what they believe audiences want or need.
www.aucegypt.edu /academic/anth/anth400/anthropology.htm   (624 words)

  
 Anthroplogy Department of Beloit College - Academics
Anthropology is the study of human cultural diversity as it has developed over time and across space, as well as in relation to biology and the environment.
Prerequisite: Anthropology 100 or consent of the instructor.
Prerequisite: Anthropology 200 or 250, or consent of the instructor.
www.beloit.edu /~anthro/red.htm   (2305 words)

  
 Commonsense geographic reasoning about Spatial Diffusion
A common example of relocation diffusion is that of migration, for instance the movement of persons from rural to urban areas.
For instance, in studies where contagious diffusion is involved, many researchers choose cellular simulations to simulate the process of spread and capture the dynamic nature of the interactions between neighboring cells.
Recall that expansion diffusion is defined as that group of spreading phenomenon that has a source and diffuses outwards from the source.
www.spatial.maine.edu /~max/KEH_i21.html   (1572 words)

  
 Glossary
Anthropology: a holistic science that studies humans, their cultures and societies in different geographical areas and different periods of time.
Cultural anthropology: a sub-field of anthropology concerned with human society in its social and cultural aspects.
Linguistic anthropology: a sub-field of anthropology that is concerned primarily with unwritten languages (both prehistoric and modern), with variation within languages, and with the social uses of language; traditionally divided into three
www.anthro.wayne.edu /ant2100/GlossaryCultAnt.htm   (3119 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The diffusion of ideas or artifacts from one culture to another is a well-attested and uncontroversial concept of cultural anthropology.
For example, the practice of agriculture is widely believed to have diffused from somewhere in the Middle East to all of Eurasia, less than 10,000 years ago.
A fad is an example of an innovation which diffuses rapidly and is fueled by an attempt to gain social status.
www.jahsonic.com /Diffusion.html   (355 words)

  
 Discover the Wisdom of Mankind on anthropology   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Anthropology grew increasingly distinct from natural history and by the end of the nineteenth century the discipline began to crystallize into its modern form - by 1935, for example, it was possible for T.K. Penniman to write a history of the discipline entitled A Hundred Years of Anthropology.
Anthropology in the U.S. Anthropology in the United States was pioneered by staff of the Bureau of Indian Affairs and the Smithsonian Institution's Bureau of American Ethnology, such as John Wesley Powell and Frank Hamilton Cushing.
Anthropology is the study of human diversity--diversity of body and behavior, in the past and present.
www.blinkbits.com /blinks/anthropology   (4818 words)

  
 Ethnography in Educational
Diffusion occurs during the interaction of two sociocultural systems as in times of war or during trade.
Of particular interest is the diffusion of ethnographic techniques, which are among the most visible traits currently being transmitted.
Single traits or sets of traits are often diffused rather than the whole trait complex in the process of acculturation or diffusion, as discussed earlier.
www.stanford.edu /~davidf/230class/diffusion.html   (4399 words)

  
 Archaeology Wordsmith
The theory of diffusion was used in the past to explain the beginning of most new ideas: it was assumed that technological skills such as metalworking, or the building of large monumental structures, could only have begun in one place, whence they diffused to other areas.
diffusion has played a major part in human development by spreading ideas and techniques more rapidly than they could have spread had they been independently invented.
The burden of proof is on the diffusionist to show that the trait is the same in the two areas, that communication between the two was possible, and that there are no difficulties in the relative dates.
www.reference-wordsmith.com /cgi-bin/lookup.cgi?category=&where=headword&terms=diffusion   (357 words)

  
 Cal U: ANT - Anthropology
An introduction to biological anthropology (primatology, hominid evolution, variation in modern humans), archaeology (methods, evidences of the evolution and diffusion of culture), anthropological linguistics, and cultural anthropology (methods of participant observation, comparative data from non-Western societies, diversity and unity of culture).
An advanced course in cultural anthropology, in which comparative data from text and films about non-Western cultures are used to reveal cultural differences and similarities and the nature of the ethnographic enterprise.
Contemporary biological anthropology, emphasizing the evolutionary theory, genetics, non-human primates, taxonomic classification, the evolution of human beings as part of the evolution of the primates, the importance of technology, and the emergence and development of culture.
www.cup.edu /universitycatalogs.jsp?pageId=1580830010421121974007577   (721 words)

  
 Semes and Genes in Africa
Discussions of race and culture were major components of early anthropology textbooks (Boas 1938, Kroeber 1923) and the fight against racism and ethnocentrism continue to be central tenets in most anthropology courses so it is not surprising that anthropologists have been reluctant to consider relationships between biology and culture.
Cultural diffusion may be popular among postmodern and ethnohistorical anthropologists because it is so easy to see in today's world-- Western capitalistic culture is rapidly diffusing throughout the world without the movement of Euroamericans.
Demic diffusion and the associated mechanisms of transmission question the anthropological effort to demonstrate that many of these semes are "adaptive" or "functional" in a particular ecology.
www.vancouver.wsu.edu /fac/hewlett/semes.html   (6737 words)

  
 Culture: A Geographical Perspective
Cultural diffusion concerns the spread of culture and the factors that account for it, such as migration, communications, trade, and commerce.
Because diffusion occurs over time as well as over space, there may be a time lag between the origin of a trait in a large city and its appearance in small towns and rural areas.
The key concepts of cultural geography are culture region, cultural diffusion, cultural landscape, cultural ecology, and cultural interaction.
www.emsc.nysed.gov /ciai/socst/grade3/geograph.html   (5633 words)

  
 Doug Padgett
Publications on the anthropology of religion are growing, and while a great deal of the output consists of reprints of classic texts, people are also beginning to re-think their theoretical standpoint towards the study of religion in some creative ways (Glazier 1997: 3).
Alone among other forms of the anthropology of religion, this subfield is concerned with the actual mental states of those undergoing religious experiences, and is found only in anthropology and not in religious studies.
Anthropology of religion thus tends to emphasize the local particularities of religious life--spirit worship, saint cults, possession--as opposed to the idealizations of religious specialists, world renunciants, or sophisticated religious ethics and scholasticism
www.indiana.edu /~wanthro/religion.htm   (2521 words)

  
 Anthropology
An introduction to physical anthropology, which surveys the major components of the field: primatology, fossil evidence and evolution, osteology, and contemporary human diversity and genetics.
The development of anthropology as a concept in response to problems of colonialism and academic professionalism.
Prerequisite: Anthropology 120 or Biology 110 or consent of instructor.
www.beloit.edu /~academic/fields/majors/anthropology_courses.php   (1621 words)

  
 Team Atlantis - Research Papers
As a result, models for diffusion were unfairly, and perhaps unconsciously, tethered to absurd theories of the past.
The unfair association between diffusion models and the lunatic fringe has stymied scientific speculation on political grounds, and not due to lack of evidence.
Certainly, it appears that inconsistencies and errors are likely present in their study and conclusion, but these problems fail to adequately explain the vast number of similarities between the Jomon and Valdivia complexes demonstrated by Meggers, Evans, and Estrada.
www.teamatlantis.com /yucatan_test/research_diffusion.html   (4985 words)

  
 diffusion - OneLook Dictionary Search
Diffusion, diffusion (f) : AllWords.com Multi-Lingual Dictionary [home, info]
Diffusion, diffusion : US Envirionmental Protection Agency Terminology Reference System [home, info]
Phrases that include diffusion: thermal diffusion, cultural diffusion, diffusion equation, eddy diffusion, diffusion respiration, more...
www.onelook.com /?w=diffusion&ls=a   (381 words)

  
 Diffusion (anthropology) Online Encyclopedia Article About Diffusion (anthropology)   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Diffusion (anthropology) Online Encyclopedia Article About Diffusion (anthropology)
The spread of one or several cultural traits from one group to another.
Diffusionism, which dominated 19th-c German anthropology, is the notion that cultural similarities are a result of diffusion, and in its extreme form, that all cultures have a common origin.
encyclopedia.jrank.org /Cambridge/entries/071/diffusion-anthropology.html   (93 words)

  
 Diffusion (anthropology)
Everett Rogers proved that, for diffusion of innovations, people consider awareness, interest, evaluation, trial, and adoption, and are influenced by change agents and opinion leaders.
Heliocentric diffusion -- the theory that all cultures originated from one culture
Evolutionary diffusion -- the theory that societies are influenced by others and that all humans share psychological traits that make them equally likely to innovate, resulting in development of similar innovations in isolation
encyclopedie-en.snyke.com /articles/diffusion_anthropology.html   (339 words)

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