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Topic: Diffusion capacity


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In the News (Sat 26 Jul 14)

  
  Capacity - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Cranial capacity is a measure of the volume of the interior of the skull
Toxic capacity is the ability of an organism, organic system or ecosystem to sustain introduction of a toxin.
Seating capacity refers to the number of people who can be seated in a venue, either in terms of the space available, or in terms of limitations set by law.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Capacity   (239 words)

  
 Capacity
Absorptive capacity Absorptive capacity is a firm's ability to value, assimilate, and apply new knowledge.
Capacity Capacity is a legal term that refers to the ability of persons to enter into contracts.
Diffusion capacity Diffusion capacity is a measurement of the pulmonary function testing.
www.brainyencyclopedia.com /topics/capacity.html   (159 words)

  
 Diffusion
Diffusion equilibrium Diffusion equilibrium is reached when the concentrations of a diffusing substance in the two compa...
Diffusion of responsibility Diffusion of responsibility is a social phenomenon which tends to occur in groups of people...
Diffusion pump Diffusion pumps are a type of molecules in the pump throat down into the bottom of the pump and out the e...
www.brainyencyclopedia.com /topics/diffusion.html   (199 words)

  
 Effect of body position on measurements of diffusion capacity after exercise -- Stewart et al. 34 (6): 440 -- British ...
is to increase the diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide of
Relative importance of diffusion and chemical reaction rates in determining rate of exchange of gases in the human lung, with special reference to true diffusing capacity of the pulmonary membrane and volume of blood in the lung capillaries.
The reduction in pulmonary diffusing capacity after exercise was not alleviated by altering body position, and was primarily due to a decrease in pulmonary capillary blood volume.
bjsportmed.com /cgi/content/full/34/6/440   (2926 words)

  
 CHEST: Relationship Between Impaired Pulmonary Diffusion and Cardiopulmonary Exercise Capacity After Heart ...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
Results: Diffusion was impaired in 40% (transfer factor for carbon monoxide) or 82.5% (carbon monoxide transfer coefficient) of the patients.
Diffusion impairment was caused by a decreased diffusing capacity of the alveolar capillary membrane in 89% and/or by a decreased blood volume of the alveolar capillaries in 46% of cases.
(2) Is the impairment in diffusion capacity associated with functional alterations at the level of the alveolocapillary membrane, as monitored by the diffusion capacity of the alveolar capillary membrane (DM) and/or alterations of the calculated blood volume of the alveolar capillaries (QC)?
www.findarticles.com /p/articles/mi_m0984/is_4_117/ai_62084078   (1129 words)

  
 CHEST: The relationship between single-breath diffusion capacity of the lung for nitric oxide and carbon monoxide ...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
Study objectives: To determine the relationship between single-breath diffusion capacity of the lung for nitric oxide (DLNO) and single-breath diffusion capacity of the long for carbon monoxide (DLCO), and to determine the single-breath DLNO/DLCO ratios during rest and at several exercise intensities using a commercial lung diffusion system that uses electrochemical cells to analyze gases.
However, over the past 15 years, diffusion capacity of the lung for nitric oxide (DLNO) has been simultaneously used with DLCO to obtain DMCO and VC in a single-breath maneuver, reducing the number of measurements and testing time by half.
Therefore, DLNO is equal to membrane diffusion capacity for nitric oxide (DMNO).
www.findarticles.com /p/articles/mi_m0984/is_3_125/ai_114819667   (990 words)

  
 [No title]
DLO2 is the total diffusion capacity of O2 from alveoli to the blood, DMO2 is the diffusion capacity of the lung capillary membrane, and (is rate of oxygen binding in the blood.
As illustrated in figure 2, the oxygen diffusion capacity DLO2 is a composite measure of the ability of oxygen to travel from the alveoli to the lung capillary plasma and then to bind with heamoglobin in the erythrocyte.
Indeed in studies using the MIGET the concept of diffusion impairment is seldom required to describe abnormalities in gas exchange, except in cases of pulmonary fibrosis (Agusti et al., 1991), exercise, or mild exercise during hypoxia (Torre-Bueno et al., 1985; Wagner et al., 1986).
www.miba.auc.dk /~sr/bookchpt.DOC   (6689 words)

  
 DETERMINANTS OF MAXIMAL OXYGEN UTILISATION   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
The oxygen transport chain includes ventilation by the lungs, diffusion between the lungs and the circulation, the blood flow (by the heart, circulation in blood) diffusion between the blood and the muscle cell and finally the processing of the oxygen by the mitochondria.
There is no difference in diffusion capacity between large and small muscle fibres as long as they have the same amount of capillaries surrounding them.
This is because the limit is a diffusion from the capillaries to the cell plasma and not within the plasma itself.
www.sportscience.org.nz /publications/report/report6.html   (845 words)

  
 Soil heat flow (2)
Each case has a conductivity, a capacity, and a diffusivity, where the diffusivity is defined as conductivity divided by capacity.
Only for molecular diffusion are the conductivity and diffusivity coefficients identical.
The water capacity term is more complex than the heat capacity term.
www.agron.iastate.edu /soilphysics/a577heat2.html   (597 words)

  
 New Page 1   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
Decreased diffusion capacity (choice A) can occur when the blood-gas barrier is thickened (e.g., diffuse interstitial fibrosis, sarcoidosis, asbestosis, respiratory distress syndrome), when the surface area of the blood-gas barrier is reduced (e.g., pneumonectomy, emphysema), or when less hemoglobin is available to carry oxygen (e.g., anemia, pulmonary embolism).
Decreased diffusion capacity (choice A) can occur when the blood-gas barrier is thickened (e.g., diffuse interstitial fibrosis, sarcoidosis, asbestosis, hyaline membrane disease), when the surface area of the blood-gas barrier is reduced (e.g., pneumonectomy, emphysema), or when less hemoglobin is available to pick up the oxygen (e.g., anemia, pulmonary embolism).
The reduced oxygen-carrying capacity of the severely anemic patient is associated with a compensatory increase in cardiac output during resting conditions, and especially during exercise.
iuhs-isa.org /PathPhysioRespiratory.htm   (3958 words)

  
 Harbin Clinic : Pulmonary Function Lab   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
The lab utilizes the Collins GS platform that measures vital capacity by spirometric volumne, diffusion capacity with 3G Realtime Response Analyzer and lung volumes by plethysmography.
DIFFUSION CAPACITY (DLCO)- The diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide measures the surface area of the lung available to gas exchange.
During the test, when breathing through a mouthpiece, the patient is asked to fully exhale and inhale to total lung capacity and hold his/her breath for 10 seconds and then exhale.
www.harbinclinic.com /dept.cfm?dept_id=38   (696 words)

  
 Pneumothorax and Lung Function Disturbances
Results of spirometry, diffusion parameters and pletismography of the patients from the SP-group are presented on the table 2.
Also, in 4 patients diffusion coefficient was 60% or less, that was not the case with the diffusion capacity.
Diffusion disorders, registered in many published series, are by most authors attributed to the existence of multiple bullae or blebs, but not to the diffuse lung emphysema.
www.uam.es /departamentos/medicina/anesnet/journals/ija/vol4n2/pneu.htm   (2269 words)

  
 Emergency Clinical Guide Presents Pulmonary Function Tests
Because the diffusion capacity of carbon monoxide reflects uptake of carbon monoxide from alveolar gas, it needs to be corrected for alveolar volume (VA): DLCO/VA. The patients with simple chronic bronchitis do not usually have hyperinflation; therefore, their lung volumes are normal.
The diffusion capacity is decreased in patients with anemia, diminished pulmonary capillary bed, decreased pulmonary tissue resulting from resection, increased diffusion distance, or decrease in the alveolar surface area and capillary blood volume as happens in emphysema.
Functional residual capacity and residual volume are both increased in ankylosing spondylitis, whereas in kyphoscoliosis, functional residual capacity, and possibly residual volume are decreased.
www.anisman.com /ecg/pulmonary_function.htm   (3158 words)

  
 The Relationship Between Single-Breath Diffusion Capacity of the Lung for Nitric Oxide and Carbon Monoxide During ...
diffusing capacities for nitric oxide and carbon monoxide is
= diffusion capacity of the lung for nitric oxide;
Roughton, FJW, Forster, RE (1957) Relative importance of diffusion and chemical reaction rates in determining rate of exchange of gases in the human lung, with special reference to true diffusing capacity of pulmonary membrane and volume of blood in the lung capillaries.
www.chestjournal.org /cgi/content/full/125/3/1019   (3363 words)

  
 Viasys Healthcare - Product Information
The MasterScreen Diffusion is the complete system for recording pulmonary diffusion capacity and simultaneous determination of alveolar volume and pulmonary volumes.
Unit for measuring diffusion capacity and lung volume including quick and precise He and CO analysers.
An ideal supplement of your MasterScreen Diffusion is the Impulse Oscillometry Option (IOS), which measures respiratory mechanics independent of cooperation and therefore is especially suited to be used with children, in the field of intensive care or directly at the bedside.
www.viasyshealthcare.com /prod_serv/prodDetail.aspx?config=ps_prodDtl&prodID=15   (526 words)

  
 Developmental Dynamics of the Definitive Mouse Placenta Assessed by Stereology -- Coan et al. 70 (6): 1806 -- Biology ...
The theoretical diffusion capacity for the interhemal membrane
diffusion capacity is an estimate of the diffusing capacity
diffusing capacity of the interhemal membrane of the mouse placenta
www.biolreprod.org /cgi/content/full/70/6/1806   (4109 words)

  
 Relationship Between Impaired Pulmonary Diffusion and Cardiopulmonary Exercise Capacity After Heart Transplantation -- ...
diffusing capacity of the alveolar capillary membrane in 89%
point, diffusion capacity was impaired in 16 patients (40%).
Braith, RW, Limacher, MC, Leggett, SH, et al (1991) Influence of pulmonary diffusion capacity on exercise induced hypoxia in orthotopic heart transplant patients [abstract].
www.chestjournal.org /cgi/content/full/117/4/968   (3562 words)

  
 Lung diffusion testing (Test) - Southwest Washington Medical Center
Lung diffusion testing is used to determine how well oxygen passes from the air sacs of the lungs into the blood.
This test is usually reported as the percent of predicted amount of carbon monoxide inhaled that should be absorbed, according to the age, sex, and height of the person.
Some of these diseases are diffuse interstitial fibrosis, sarcoidosis, asbestosis, and emphysema.
www.swmedicalcenter.com /11432.cfm   (422 words)

  
 Cabral v. Metropolitan District Commission
He testified that this type of diffusion capacity test was performed throughout hospitals all over the country, and that the “re-breathing” method used by Dr. DeGraff was only a research technique that is neither relied upon by the AMA nor standardized among hospitals.
DeGraff explained that he tested the claimant’s diffusing capacity, i.e., the ability of his lungs to transfer carbon monoxide from the lung air space into the blood that circulates in the lungs, in order to determine the amount of working lung tissue.
A 1986 test had shown the claimant to have a diffusing capacity of 29 (107% of the predicted value), but tests performed in January, February, and December 1994 revealed absolute scores of 14.3, 15.2 and 14.2 (54%, 60%, and 53% of the predicted value, respectively).
wcc.state.ct.us /CRB/1999/3770crb.htm   (2181 words)

  
 Clinical Program - Tufts-New England Medical Center - Pulmonary Department   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
The diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO) is a sensitive measure of the gas exchanging surface of the lung.
Unlike oxygen which is limited in its ability to diffuse across the alveolar capillary membrane surface by perfusion and the intrinsic properties of the membrane, carbon monoxide (CO) is limited almost exclusively by the latter.
Although these values are useful in identifying the contribution of lung volume and red cell volume to the diffusion capacity, when in the normal predicted range should not be misconstrued to suggest that the diffusion capacity is normal.
www.nemc.org /pulmonary/Clinical/PulmoFunction.asp   (1421 words)

  
 Physiological Limitations
The capacity for oxygen consumption is reliant upon the physiological parameters of maximal oxygen uptake, lactate threshold, and economy of movement in the given activity.
Pulmonary diffusion is the exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide between the lungs and the blood.
Despite this possibility, pulmonary diffusion is thought to play a minor role in the overall limitation of oxygen delivery for endurance performance.
www.drlenkravitz.com /Articles/limitations.html   (3818 words)

  
 SRO Paper: SRO Paper
diffusion capacity in the brain is much lower than that of glucose (for discussion see Lenzi et al., 1999), so that relevant PO gradients can be measured in the tissue (see above) and venous PO2 is by no means representative of average tissue PO2.
diffusion was estimated as ~0.37 in muscle (Tuhin and Popel, 1996) and ~0.50 in the lung (West, 1990).
diffusion limitation exists in the brain, albeit restricted to microregions far from capillaries, is in particular required to explain a) the presence in brain tissue of spots with PO close to zero, and b) the fact that H+ concentration is reduced by increasing arterial PO in the range 100 to 300 mmHg.
www.sro.org /2000/Lenzi/77/paper.html   (5819 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
They include, but are not limited to, spirometry, diffusion capacity studies, lung volumes and gas diffusion studies.
Diffusion capacity measurement is often indicated when spirometry and lung volume studies reveal restrictive disease.
Diffusion capacity is also useful in quantifying the degree of parenchymal destruction in COPD and assessing pulmonary vascular diseases and interstitial diseases, even if vital capacity is normal.
www.ghimedicare.com /archived/pu002e02.html   (2346 words)

  
 New York Empire Medicare Policy: Pulmonary Function Tests (YPF # 131) (YMDT # 14)
Lung volumes may also be indicated (regardless of the vital capacity) in the presence of COPD with hyperinflation, bullous disease and consideration of lung reduction surgery.
Diffusion capacity measurement is indicated when spirometry and lung volume studies reveal restrictive disease.
Diffusion capacity is also useful in quantitating the degree of parenchymal destruction in COPD and to assess pulmonary vascular diseases and intersitial diseases, even if vital capacity is normal.
www.empiremedicare.com /BENENEWS/brf0897/pft.htm   (1179 words)

  
 COSVI Medicare - LMRP Pulmonary function studies   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
Measurements of lung volumes and capacities are useful in the diagnosis of restrictive lung disorders and expiratory flow measurements permit the identification of obstructive pulmonary impairment in view of its inverse relationship with airway resistance.
The diffusion capacity measures the transfer from inspired gas to pulmonary capillary blood.
In addition to classifying respiratory diseases as restrictive, obstructive or mixed, pulmonary function studies are useful in determining the severity of pulmonary impairment caused by a given illness, to follow disease progression and to evaluate the effect of therapeutic interventions.
www.cosvi.com /Medicare/articulos/Politicas/96-86-05.htm   (2044 words)

  
 Cardiopulmonary Metabolic Exercise Stress Testing: Frontera Strategies
Maximal capacity of the lungs to move air (ventilate) for 12-15 seconds; extrapolated to liters per minute (L/min).
Respiratory diseases, such as emphysema or pulmonary fibrosis or even pulmonary edema reduce the diffusion capacity of the lungs.
Total lung capacity is defined as the residual volume (RV) and SVC combined and indicates possible restrictive processes or hyperinflation often associated with obstructive defects.
www.frontstrat.com /services/procedures.asp   (528 words)

  
 Diffusion Objectives   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
Identify the proper notation for the single breath carbon monoxide diffusing capacity.
State the simplified mathematical equation for the diffusing capacity of the lung.
Describe the four (4) corrections that should be made to the diffusion capacity value to render the value more accurate.
classes.kumc.edu /sah/resp390/diff_obj.html   (219 words)

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