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Topic: Dignaga


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In the News (Wed 17 Jul 19)

  
  Tashi Deleg! The Padma Samye Ling Bulletin: Enlightened Masters: Acharya Dignaga
Dignaga did not question the value of these sources of knowledge and opinions, but he clarified their relationship to one another and delineated their ranges of application.
Dignaga cannot say that perception involves the interaction of senses with their objects, because such a claim could be established only by invoking the elements of inference.
Dignaga's "law of extension" requires that one who wishes to convince another of his own conclusion has to state both subject and predicate as well as the reason which connects them, along with suitable examples which illustrate the linkage between the reason and the predicate.
transponent.typepad.com /tashideleg/2005/05/enlightened_mas.html   (2830 words)

  
 Dignaga's Logic of Invention
Dignaga was not able to entirely free himself from the pressure of the methodological tradition (506).
According to Frauwallner Dignaga combined what was existent in rudiments at his time, Vasubandhu's dialectic, Samkya's epistemology, and elements from the philosophy of language of the grammarians, to errect a big building the whole later school was dependent of (Frauwallner 1959, 83).
Dignaga ended this unsatisfying state by fixing the relation between reason and consequence with the help of his wheel of reason.
www.yogacara.net /smf/index.php?topic=23.0;prev_next=prev   (3628 words)

  
 THE AUTHORSHIP OF THE NYAYAPRAVESA
This is certainly strong evidence that there was a Chinese tradition which ascribed the text to Dignaga, and, therefore, derogates fatally from the conclusiveness of the argument from the Chinese tradition.
Dignaga appears to me in this passage, which is unquestionably his, to declare clearly that all the relations of probans and probandum have nothing whatever to do with external reality-which on his idealistic system(4) was beyond knowledge if it had any existence at all--but depend upon the intellect.
While the question of the invention of the trairupya, or three canons of syllogism, is not essentially bound up with the issue of priority of discovery of the doctrine of indissoluble connection, it seems to me that the effort(3) to ascribe it to the Vaisesika school is implausible.
ccbs.ntu.edu.tw /FULLTEXT/JR-ENG/kei.htm   (1908 words)

  
  Formalisation of ancient logics: Dignaga
The Indian Buddhist philosopher and logician Dignaga (A.D. 480-540), a disciple of Vasubandhu, laid the foundations for the Buddhist teachings on cognition theory and logic.
Dignaga's Pramanasamuccaya (Compendium of the Means of True Knowledge) is one of the greatest works on Buddhist logic.
It may be regarded as a bridge between the older doctrine of trairuupia and Dignaga's own later theory of vyaapti which is a concept related to the Western notion of implication.
www.logic.glashoff.net /ks_dignaga.html   (346 words)

  
 The Theosophy Trust   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-28)
Dignaga did not question the value of these sources of knowledge and opinions, but he clarified their relationship to one another and delineated their ranges of application.
Dignaga cannot say that perception involves the interaction of senses with their objects, because such a claim could be established only by invoking the elements of inference.
Dignaga's "law of extension" requires that one who wishes to convince another of his own conclusion has to state both subject and predicate as well as the reason which connects them, along with suitable examples which illustrate the linkage between the reason and the predicate.
www.theosophytrust.org /tlodocs/dispreport.php?d=teachers/Dignaga.htm   (2592 words)

  
 Theosophy Trust
The spiritual seriousness of argumentation is evidenced by the fact that an individual defeated in a thorough and exhaustive exchange was honour-bound to accept the victor's standpoint, even if this meant changing religious allegiances.
Whilst logic had been a dominant concern of many thinkers and teachers, Dignaga turned his whole mind to the topic and refounded the art of reasoning in the service of Truth.
Dignaga offered no definition of perception, in part because it is common knowledge and in part because it cannot be defined save through itself.
theosophytrust.org /tlodocs/articlesTeacher.php?d=Dignaga.htm&p=35   (2608 words)

  
 The Buddhist Philosophy of Universal Flux
Dignaga's failure to put pratyaksa under the rubric of Valid Knowledge is made an occasion for sophistical attack by Uddyotakara.
Dignaga seems to be the first logician to have emphasized the necessity of the statement of universal concomitance in syllogistic argument
The fallacy of the 'uncommon inconclusive probans' propounded by Dignaga is antagonistic to the theory of internal concomitance
www.buddhart.com /book/details/IDC142   (3945 words)

  
 Buddhist Logic and Ontology. A survey of recent studies
Buddhist literature prior to Dignaga deals with the problem of knowledge and the means of knowing either very casually or not at all.
But Dignaga felt the necessity for a distinct treatise on epistemology and logic to establish the Buddhist doctrines in a logical manner.
When Dignaga undertook an examination of the logical tenets of other philosophical schools in his treatise there were reactions from the latter.
www.formalontology.it /buddhist-philosophy.htm   (5399 words)

  
 Formalisation of ancient logics: Dignaga
The Indian Buddhist philosopher and logician Dignaga (A.D. 480-540), a disciple of Vasubandhu, laid the foundations for the Buddhist teachings on cognition theory and logic.
There are some in-built limitations of modern formal logic which prevent it from being the "natural universal instrument" for the understanding of each and every logical system.
It may be regarded as a bridge between the older doctrine of trairuupia and Dignaga's own later theory of vyaapti which is a concept related to the Western notion of implication.
logic.glashoff.net /ks_dignaga.html   (346 words)

  
 Tashi Deleg! The Padma Samye Ling Bulletin: Enlightened Masters: Acharya Dharmakirti
By the time the Buddhist tradition was virtually forgotten in India, the works of Nagarjuna, Asanga, Vasubandhu, Dignaga, Chandrakirti, Shantideva and Dharmakirti had become foundational stones of a Buddhist renaissance and expansion in unexpected and unknown lands, where it has remained vital until the present.
In the 7th century, Dharmakirti was born into a Brahmin family in in the southern kingdom of Cudamani (Trimalaya or perhaps Tirumalla) and from early childhood was recognized as a boy of exceptional intellect.
Though he accepted Dignaga's view that perception is a form of knowledge, he added that it had to be unerring.
transponent.typepad.com /tashideleg/2005/10/enlightened_mas.html   (1441 words)

  
 Indian Logic Forum :: View topic - The Hetucakra of Dignaga
The important Indian philosopher Dignaga has with his short work on the Wheel of Reason influenced the development of Indian logic for hundreds of years.
It will become clear that Dignaga's logic cannot be reduced to either Aristotelian or modern logic of classes.
Dignaga unites both the intensional and extensional point of view in a way not known to European logic till the end of last (19th) century.
nyaya.darsana.org /post90.html   (279 words)

  
 Dignaga - Information at Halfvalue.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-28)
This branch of Buddhist thought defended the view that there exists a kind of real personality independent of the elements or aggregates composing it.
Among Dignaga's works there is Hetucakra (The wheel of reason), considered his first work on formal logic, advancing a new form of deductive reasoning.
It may be regarded as a bridge between the older doctrine of trairūpya and Dignaga's own later theory of vyāpti which is a concept related to the Western notion of implication.
www.halfvalue.com /wiki.jsp?topic=Dignaga   (273 words)

  
 The Buddhist Concepts of Pramana and Pratyaksa
The book is a critical analysis of basic concepts of pramana and pratyaksa of Buddhist epistemology, found in the works of Dignaga, Dharmakirti, Santarakita et al.
Yet, a proper perspective of the Buddhist position cannot be gleaned from these, because the Buddhist views do not always correcpond to the critique’s interpretations and critics chose to analyse them in the backdrop of those views which are indigenous to their own systems.
The present work tries to show that a careful study of these text reveals that most criticisms of Mimamsa, Nyaya and Jaina philosophers could be refuted in the light of the fundamental Buddhist view on pramana and its different forms can be defended against the onslaught of the critiques.
www.easternbookcorporation.com /moreinfo.php?txt_searchstring=9409   (246 words)

  
 Theosophy Trust
By the time the Buddhist tradition was virtually forgotten in India, the works of Nagarjuna, Asanga, Vasubandhu, Dignaga, Chandrakirti, Shantideva and Dharmakirti had become foundation stones of a Buddhist renaissance and expansion in strange and alien lands, where it has remained vital until the present.
Though he accepted Dignaga's view that perception is a form of knowledge, he added that it had to be unerring.
Unlike Dignaga, Dharmakirti did not recognize any difference between a contradiction, in which two terms are opposed, and an implied contradiction, in which the terms are opposed if one of them is taken in a certain sense.
www.theosophytrust.org /tlodocs/articlesTeacher.php?d=Dharmakirti.htm&p=34   (2604 words)

  
 Dharmakirti at AllExperts
Born around the turn of the 7th century, Dharmakirti was a South Indian Brahman and became a teacher at the famed Nalanda University, as well as a poet.
He built on and re-interpreted the work of the pioneer in Buddhist Logic, Dignaga, and was very influential among Brahman logicians as well as Buddhists.
Dharmakirti presents most of his ideas in the guise of commentary on Dignaga's works, even if his theories go beyond what was presented by his predecessor.
en.allexperts.com /e/d/dh/dharmakirti.htm   (397 words)

  
 Dignaga   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-28)
Among Dignaga's works there is Hetucakra (The wheel of reason), considered his first work on formal logic, advancing a new form of deductive reasoning.
It may be regarded as a bridge between the older doctrine of trairūpya and Dignaga's own later theory of vyāpti which is a concept related to the Western notion of implication.
Other works include The Treatise on the Objects of Cognition, The Treatise on Systems of Cognition, and The Treatise on the Correct Principles of Logic, produced in an effort to establish what were the valid sources of knowledge (see Epistemology).
buddhism.2be.net /Dignaga   (205 words)

  
 Dignaga
Der indische Logiker Dignaga gilt als Schöpfer der buddhistischen Logik.
Der Begriff ist bei Dignaga ein Produkt des Denkens.
Dignaga untersucht die Frage, welchen Forderungen man den logischen Grund unterordnen muß, damit er notwendige und hinreichende Bedingung wird.
www.philosophenlexikon.de /dignaga.htm   (143 words)

  
 Buddhist Logic (2 Vols.)
Also, the available books and articles on Buddhism deal almost exclusively with its religious aspects, and pass over the extensive system of logic that forms an important part of its philosophy as a whole.
This book is coverage of the Mahayana Buddhistic logic of the school of Dignaga (and his follower, expositors, and continuers - especially Dharmakirti).
Vasubandhu, Vinitadeva, Vacaspatimisra, Udayana, Dignaga and Jinendrabuddhi on the act and the content of knowledge, on the coordination (sarupya) of percepts with their objects and on our knowledge of the external world
www.exoticindiaart.com /book/details/IDC857   (584 words)

  
 books indian rare reprint buddhist logic
The first volume is a history of Indian logic with Central Asiatic continuation and then a detailed exposition of Dignaga system.
Dignaga's, tract on the Unreality of the External World, 8.
Vasubandhu, Vinitadeva, Vacaspatimisra, Udayana, Dignaga and Jinendrabuddhi on the act and the content of knowledge, on the coordination (sarupya) of percepts with their objects and on our knowledge of the external world, V. Vacaspatimisra on Buddhist Nominalism (apohavada), VI.
www.lppindia.com /htm/8175361751.htm   (634 words)

  
 Indian Logic Forum :: View topic - A Symposium about Indian logic in Hangzhou China
Dignaga and others, Selected Works of Hetuvidya in Ancient India (four volumes), Nationalities Publishing House, Beijing, March 1988-April 1990.
Dignaga, Brief Annotations on the "Pramanasamuccaya," China Social Sciences Publishing House, Beijing, March 1982.
But in the Nyayabindu of Dharmakirti, the claim called chu zong you fa in Chinese, i.e, to exclude the dharmin from both sapakṣa and vipakṣa, has been given up, for the fifth sentence in the circle of reasons, the sound is non-eternal, because it's what be heard, hasn't be refered any more in the Nyayabindu.
nyaya.darsana.org /topic76.html   (1901 words)

  
 ACIP Release 6
Dignaga Treatise known as The Compendium of All the Works on Valid Perception
Dignaga Commentary upon The Analysis of the Objects of Perception
Dignaga Treatise on Valid Perception entitled Entering the Study of Reasoning
www.asianclassics.org /research_site/webdata/engsubhtml/sub17.html   (304 words)

  
 Amazon.co.uk: Dignaga on the Interpretation of Signs (Studies of Classical India): Books: Richard P. Hayes
Amazon.co.uk: Dignaga on the Interpretation of Signs (Studies of Classical India): Books: Richard P. Hayes
Publisher: learn how customers can search inside this book.
Dignaga on the Interpretation of Signs (Studies of Classical India) (Hardcover)
www.amazon.co.uk /Dignaga-Interpretation-Signs-Studies-Classical/dp/9027726671   (232 words)

  
 The Yogacara School of the Mahayana Buddhist Philosophy
Subtradition of Dignaga — Dharmakirti originated from Vasubandhu's subtradition (as it is well known, Dignaga was a disciple of Vasubandhu, and Dharmakirti — that of Dharmapala's) and its proper name is
of Dignaga - Dharmakirti branch was called by this name because of some special features of this subschool.
The philosophers of this trend together with the Sautrantikas of the Hinayana tradition taught that sensations contained an element of the real knowledge.
www.kheper.net /topics/Buddhism/Yogacara.html   (1452 words)

  
 The anti-abstractionism of Dignaga and Berkeley. - Philosophy East and West - HighBeam Research
All inquiries regarding rights should be directed to the Gale Group.
Both the Buddhist philosopher Dignaga and the Western idealist Berkeley oppose the use of abstract entities in an indirect theory of reference, such as the theories of Bhartrhari or John Locke that reference is determined by abstract universals of meaning.
However, Berkeley does not give a satisfactory account of the relation between language and the world, whereas Dignaga's concept of 'apoha' ('exclusion') does provide the basis for a valid 'word-world mechanism.' Dignaga shows how words are related to the world through beliefs or dispositions based on properties of the referent rather than...
www.highbeam.com /doc/1G1-14891844.html?refid=ip_hf   (147 words)

  
 Alibris: Dignaga
The Buddhist philosophy of universal flux : an exposition of the philosophy of critical realism as expounded by the school of Dignaga
Dignaga, On perception : being the Pratyaksapariccheda of Dignaga's Pramanasamuccaya from the Sanskrit fragments and the Tibetan versions
An advanced text on the workings of both direct & conceptual cognition.
www.alibris.com /search/books/subject/Dignaga   (171 words)

  
 Indiaclub.com: Buddhist Logic - 2 Volumes bound in One : Religion
This work in 2 volumes bound in one covers Mahayyana Buddhistic logic of the school of Dignaga.
Dignaga’s tract on the Unreality of the External World
Vasubandhu, Vinitadeva, Vacaspatimisra, Udayana, Dignaga and Jinendrabuddhi on the act and the content of knowledge, on the coordination (sarupya) of percepts with their objects and on our knowledge of the external world.
www.indiaclub.com /shop/searchresults.asp?prodstock=8767   (398 words)

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