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Topic: Dihydrogen monoxide hoax


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In the News (Sat 25 May 19)

  
  Dihydrogen Monoxide - Rumor and Truth
Dihydrogen monoxide pranks have been around for years, appearing in student projects, e-mail hoaxes and a number of silly websites.
Dihydrogen monoxide is colorless, odorless, tasteless, and kills uncounted thousands of people every year.
All dihydrogen monoxide pranks share two things in common: (1) they are generally based in fact, and (2) they neglect to mention that “dihydrogen monoxide” is just another name for water.
www.plasticsmythbuster.org /polystyrene.asp   (521 words)

  
 Facts About Dihydrogen Monoxide
Dihydrogen Monoxide (DHMO) is a colorless and odorless chemical compound, also referred to by some as Dihydrogen Oxide, Hydrogen Hydroxide, Hydronium Hydroxide, or simply Hydric acid.
Each year, Dihydrogen Monoxide is a known causative component in many thousands of deaths and is a major contributor to millions upon millions of dollars in damage to property and the environment.
One of the most surprising facts recently revealed about Dihydrogen Monoxide contamination is in its use as a food and produce "decontaminant." Studies have shown that even after careful washing, food and produce that has been contaminated by DHMO remains tainted by DHMO.
www.dhmo.org /facts.html   (0 words)

  
  Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Dihydrogen monoxide hoax
Dihydrogen monoxide (DHMO) is a scientific name for water that is relatively unknown to most of the public, used in hoaxes that illustrate how the lack of scientific knowledge and an exaggerated analysis can lead to misplaced fears.
"Dihydrogen monoxide", though simply a chemical term for water, may sound dangerous to those with some degree of chemophobia or who hold to an ideal of a "chemical-free" life.
Literally, the term "dihydrogen monoxide" means "two hydrogen, one oxygen", consistent with its molecular formula: the prefix di in dihydrogen means "two", the prefix mono in monoxide means "one", and an oxide is a compound that contains one or more oxygen atoms.
www.reference.com /browse/wiki/Dihydrogen_monoxide_hoax   (1318 words)

  
  Dihydrogen monoxide hoax - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Dihydrogen monoxide (DHMO) is an obscure name for water, used in hoaxes that illustrate how ignorance of science and one-sided analysis can lead to misplaced fears.
The hoax involves listing strictly negative effects of water, such as erosion or death by drowning, attributing them to "dihydrogen monoxide", and then asking individuals to help control the seemingly dangerous substance.
The prefix "di" in "dihydrogen" means two and the prefix "mono" in "monoxide" means one.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Dihydrogen_monoxide_hoax   (956 words)

  
 ipedia.com: Hoax Article   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Many hoaxes are also motivated by a desire to satirize or educate by exposing the credulity of the public or the absurdity of the target: literary and artistic hoaxes are often of this sort, although political hoaxes are sometimes motivated in part or whole by the desire to ridicule or expose politicians or political institutions.
The status of a given factoid as reliable or hoax is often the subject of considerable controversy.
Bathtub Hoax, perpetrated by American journalist and satirist Mencken in the 1920's, was credited even after it was exposed by the author.
www.ipedia.com /hoax.html   (603 words)

  
 Dihydrogen monoxide hoax
Dihydrogen monoxide (DHMO) and hydrogen hydroxide (HOH) are technically accurate but never-used names for water.
The success of this hoax has been widely publicized, and dihydrogen monoxide became an archetype of civic consciousness gone amiss due to lack of informed reasoning.
A similar hoax was perpetrated in Britain around the idea of an addictive, fattening substance known as 'CAKE', as part of the spoof news show Brass Eye.
www.xasa.com /wiki/en/wikipedia/d/di/dihydrogen_monoxide_hoax.html   (348 words)

  
 Wikipedia search result
A hoax is an attempt to trick an audience into believing that something false is real.
If you see an article that may be a hoax, mark it with the {{hoax}} tag and nominate it for deletion.
If the article is indeed found to be a hoax, it is appropriate to warn the user with {{uw-hoax}}.
feedbus.com /wikis/wikipedia.php?title=Wikipedia:Hoaxes   (645 words)

  
 Dihydrogen monoxide hoax - the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Dihydrogen monoxide (DHMO) is a humorous, scientific-sounding name for water.It is a running joke among chemists, aboutenvironmental activists and others, used to illustratehow general ignorance of science can lead to wildly misplaced fears.
A similar hoax was perpetrated in Britain around the idea of an addictive, fattening substance known as 'CAKE', as part ofthe spoof news show Brass Eye.
In March 2004, Aliso Viejo, Californiaconsidered banning the use of foam containers at city-sponsored events because dihydrogen monoxide is part of their production.The issue was put on the agenda of the City Council after a paralegal found mention of DHMO online and did not realize it was ajoke.
www.world-knowledge-encyclopedia.com /?t=DHMO   (595 words)

  
 Carbon Monoxide Testers   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Carbon monoxide is also present in small but significant concentr 83: lete combustion of wood, also contains carbon monoxide as a major component.
Dihydrogen monoxide hoax 1: '''Dihydrogen monoxide ''' (DHMO) and '''hydrogen hydroxide''' (HOH) are 5: s hoax has been widely publicized, and dihydrogen monoxide became an archetype of civic consciousness gone a 7: list of supposed risks associated with dihydrogen monoxide include: 18: to banning styrofoam cups because dihydrogen monoxide was used in their production.
Carbon monoxide is formed by incomplete combustion, and is a colo 233: arbon have a wide range of toxic action.
www.elusiveeye.com /side49763-carbon-monoxide-testers.html   (231 words)

  
 hoax : QuicklyFind Info   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Many hoaxes are also motivated by a desire to satirize or educate by exposing the credulity of the public or the absurdity of the target: literary and artistic hoaxes are often of this sort, although political hoaxes are sometimes motivated in part or whole by the desire to ridicule or expose politicians or political institutions.
The status of a given factoid as reliable or hoax is often the subject of considerable controversy.
Bathtub Hoax, perpetrated by American journalist and satirist Mencken in the 1920's, was credited even after it was exposed by the author.
www.quicklyfind.com /info/hoax.htm   (472 words)

  
 Teaching Tips 65
While the more significant dangers of Dihydrogen Monoxide are currently addressed by a number of agencies including FDA, FEMA and CDC, public awareness of the real and daily dangers of Dihydrogen Monoxide is lower than some think it should be.
Dihydrogen Monoxide (DHMO) is a colorless and odorless chemical compound, also referred to by some as Dihydrogen Oxide, Hydrogen Hydroxide, Hydronium Hydroxide, or simply Hydric acid.
Each year, Dihydrogen Monoxide is a known causative component in many thousands of deaths and is a major contributor to millions upon millions of dollars in damage to property and the environment.
www.developingteachers.com /tips/pasttips65.htm   (2849 words)

  
 Wired News: The Best Internet Spoofs
Internet hoaxes have been around for as long as the internet itself, and we never run out of people willing to fall for them.
Dihydrogen monoxide kills: Craig Jackson created a website in 1994 campaigning against dihydrogen monoxide, and it went downhill from there.
People are still susceptible to this hoax; not long ago it was added to the agenda for discussion at a city council meeting in Aliso Viejo, California.
wiredblogs.tripod.com /internetspoofs/index.album?i=8   (140 words)

  
 Dihydrogen
Potassium Dihydrogen Phosphate (KDP) and Potassium Dideuterium Phosphate (KD*P) are...
Y es, we are talking about hydrogen hydroxide, also known as dihydrogen monoxide, and we are here to tell you that what you've heard about DHMO is probably not the whole truth.
Dihydrogen monoxide (DHMO) is an obscure name for water used in variations of a common hoax that illustrates how ignorance of science and one-sided analysis can lead to misplaced fears among environmental...
sodiumphosphate.moatsodium.com /dihydrogen   (683 words)

  
 Dihydrogen Monoxide@Everything2.com
Dihydrogen monoxide is colorless, odorless, tasteless, and kills uncounted thousands of people every year.
Quantities of dihydrogen monoxide have been found in almost every stream, lake, and reservoir in America today.
Water, the street name for dihydrogen monoxide (sometimes called ice when in its "rock" form), is an insidious substance that has addicted almost every man, woman, and child in the world.
www.everything2.com /index.pl?node_id=94592   (1077 words)

  
 Health Stream News Items - Issue 33 March 2004   (Site not responding. Last check: )
City councillors in the Californian town of Aliso Viejo have been embarrassed by the revelation that they were fooled by a hoax website about the dangerous properties of "dihydrogen monoxide", and had been about to debate a motion to ban the substance from their city.
The hoax is believed to have originated from the science fair project of a 14 year-old US junior high school student in 1997.
The student presented fifty of his classmates with a report on the hazards of dihydrogen monoxide then asked what should be done about it.
www.waterquality.crc.org.au /hsarch/HS33f.htm   (605 words)

  
 Ideas Happen - a project of Lisa and Chris Brewer
Dihydrogen monoxide is colorless, odorless, tasteless, and kills uncounted thousands of people every year.
Quantities of dihydrogen monoxide have been found in almost every stream, lake, and reservoir in America today.
Zohner's project wasn't original: spoof petitions about dihydrogen monoxide and other innocuous "dangers" have been circulating for years, and Zohner based his project on a bogus report that was already making the rounds of the Internet.
www.ideashappen.org /dihydrogen_monoxide.html   (739 words)

  
 Dihydrogen monoxide hoax - Definition, explanation
Dihydrogen monoxide (DHMO) is a scientific-sounding name for water used in a common hoax that illustrates how ignorance of science can lead to misplaced fears among environmental activists and others.
Although this hoax was brought to widespread public attention in 1997, when Nathan Zohner, a 14-year-old student, gathered petitions to ban "DHMO" as the basis of his science project, aptly titled "How Gullible Are We?", the hoax actually predates Zohner by many years (see, for instance, this Usenet posting from 1990)
In March 2004, Aliso Viejo, California almost considered banning the use of foam containers at city-sponsored events because dihydrogen monoxide is part of their production.
www.calsky.com /lexikon/en/txt/d/di/dihydrogen_monoxide_hoax.php   (727 words)

  
 Guardian | Something in the dihydrogen monoxide
And when they came across the huge threat posed to their constituents by dihydrogen monoxide they did what any elected official should do: they took steps to protect their community.
The perils of dihydrogen monoxide have been ignored until now largely because it is better known by its common name: water.
The dihydrogen monoxide hoax is the result of a collaboration between the two prime suspects: a zealously concerned paralegal faced with an authoritative-looking spoof scientific website, dhmo.org, home to the Dihydrogen Monoxide Research Division.
www.guardian.co.uk /print/0,,4886947-110878,00.html   (467 words)

  
 Beware of Dihydrogen Monoxide? - BreakTheChain.org
The term "dihydrogen monoxide" refers to the chemical bonding of two (di) hydrogen (H) atoms to one (mono) oxygen (O) atom.
Acting on the research of a paralegal, the officials were ready to submit a proposal to city council to ban styrofoam cups and containers at events requiring licenses from the city.
Among the reasons cited for the ban was the fact that dihydrogen monoxide is used extensively in the manufacturing process and is known to "threaten human health and safety." After learning they'd fallen for a hoax, officials pulled their proposal off the agenda.
www.breakthechain.org /exclusives/h2owarning.html   (698 words)

  
 Hoax Websites: A-J
Hoax websites that I've found since then can be found by looking at the 'hoax websites' category for the weblog.
Reminiscent of the Swiss Spaghetti Harvest hoax of 1957.
A clearinghouse of information for citizens concerned about the dangerous chemical Dihydrogen Monoxide which is present in numerous toxic substances and can be lethal if inhaled.
www.museumofhoaxes.com /hoaxsites.html   (0 words)

  
 Dihydrogen Monoxide Hoax Dissertation Help, Write a Dissertation on Dihydrogen Monoxide Hoax Thesis
Since 1998, our Dihydrogen Monoxide Hoax experts have helped master, doctoral, and post-graduate students worldwide by providing the most comprehensive research service on the Internet for Dihydrogen Monoxide Hoax studies and coursework.
Our Dihydrogen Monoxide Hoax researchers are highly-educated specialists with impeccable research and writing skills who have vast experience in preparing doctoral-level research materials.
Dihydrogen Monoxide Hoaxs Dissertation Copyright © 1999-2006 www.phd-dissertations.com All rights reserved.
www.phd-dissertations.com /topic/dihydrogen_monoxide_hoax_dissertation_thesis.html   (0 words)

  
 Nebezpečný dihydrogen monoxid šíří hrůzu. Studenti jej chtějí zakázat - iDNES.cz
dihydrogen monoxid je každoročně příčinou úmrtí mnoha lidí.
Toho, jak je dihydrogen monoxid ve výzkumných kruzích opomíjený, si všimli již studenti Eric Lechner, Lars Norpchen, Matthew Kaufman a Craig Jaskson.
A nezapomeňte, bylo prokázáno, že rozpoznat seriózní výzkum od manipulativních statistik nedokáže až 83% pravidelných uživatelů dihydrogen monoxidu...
technet.idnes.cz /nebezpecny-dihydrogen-monoxid-siri-hruzu-studenti-jej-chteji-zakazat-1ey-/sw_internet.asp?c=A070221_171908_sw_internet_pka   (889 words)

  
 Dihydrogen monoxide hoax - Free net encyclopedia
Image:DMRDlogo.gif Dihydrogen monoxide (DHMO) is an obscure name for water used in variations of a common hoax that illustrates how ignorance of science and one-sided analysis can lead to misplaced fears among environmental activists and others.
The hoax was apparently created by Eric Lechner and Lars Norpchen in 1990, revised by Craig Jackson in 1994, and was brought to widespread public attention in 1997, when Nathan Zohner, a 14-year-old student, gathered petitions to ban "DHMO" as the basis of his science project, titled "How Gullible Are We?"
The term "monoxide," despite its systematic origin, may also have negative connotations due to its association with highly toxic carbon monoxide.
www.netipedia.com /index.php/DHMO   (895 words)

  
 WMT.in - Webmaster Forum - Ban Dihydrogen Monoxide
Dihydrogen monoxide (DHMO) is a scientific-sounding name for water used in a common hoax that illustrates how ignorance of science can lead to misplaced fears among environmental activists and others.
The joke involves attributing common attributes and uses of water to "dihydrogen monoxide", then asking people to take action to control this dangerous-seeming chemical.
Although this hoax was brought to widespread public attention in 1997, when Nathan Zohner, a 14-year-old student, gathered petitions to ban "DHMO" as the basis of his science project, aptly titled "How Gullible Are We?", the hoax actually predates Zohner by many years (see, for instance, this Usenet posting from 1990 (http://groups-beta.google.com/group/...85a069a2a19d8/))
www.webmastertalk.in /chit-chat/1748-ban-dihydrogen-monoxide-print.html   (912 words)

  
 Nexology Community - Officials Almost Fall for H20 Hoax
Groups have been perpetrating a hoax that dihydrogen monoxide (also known as water) is a lethal chemical.
They were on the verge of banning foam cups which contain dihydrogen monoxide because of the chemicals potential to leach into the contents.
Do a search for "dihydrogen monoxide" and almost all of the results for miles around are "ban dihydrogen monoxide".
www.nexusportal.net /printthread.php?threadid=6269   (395 words)

  
 The Smokers Club, Inc. - Hoax Soaks Aliso Viejo
Weeks later, the hoax took on a life of its own after a junior high school student in Eagle Rock, Idaho, used it in a science fair project to prove how gullible people can be.
The student conducted a survey of residents about the dangers of dihydrogen monoxide and found that 86% favored banning the substance - without knowing what it was.
One of them, the Dihydrogen Monoxide Research Division, maintains an extensive, if satirical, website detailing the harmful effects of the chemical - from tissue damage caused by prolonged exposure (wrinkly skin after soaking in the bath tub) to death by overdose (drowning).
www.smokersclubinc.com /modules.php?name=News&file=article&sid=92   (637 words)

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