Factbites
 Where results make sense
About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   PR   |   Contact us  

Topic: Dilbertian


  
 [No title]
Dilbertian wars, as mobile as bits, are in progress everywhere you look.
In the Dilbertian wars, the battlefield is strewn with the lack of bodies.
These are the Dilbertian wars that are fought on the ground.
www.mindspring.com /~rfleeter/OLDdilbertwars.htm   (3669 words)

  
 The SF Site Featured Review: The Atrocity Archives
The novel is a neat mix of horrific fantasy -- demons and Lovecraftian monsters and the like -- with smart contemporary SF.
Add aspects of spy thrillers and Dilbertian office comedy, and throw in Nazis and nasty Islamists and a very secret branch of British Intelligence.
But aside from the dangerous job, the Laundry is just another Dilbertian government job environment.
www.sfsite.com /06b/aa178.htm   (750 words)

  
 Office Space   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
Mike Judge, creator of Beavis and Butthead and King of the Hill, makes an undistinguished foray into live action with this Dilbertian satire of office life.
Unusually for an animator's live action debut, Office Space has almost no visual style to speak of.
Perhaps 10 years ago, when Judge was animating the Saturday Night Live shorts that Office Space is adapted from, it was enough to point out that cubicles are small and bosses are mean, but nowadays, a satirist needs to wield a sharper knife—not a spatula.
www.citypaper.net /movies/o/officespace.shtml   (110 words)

  
 Nick's Manifesto for the 'Net
Working like this is immeasurably more productive than a daily commute and a rat-race in a Dilbertian office environment.
My dream is so strong that in 1997, I quit my previous Dilbertian job, and set up my own company to work full time on harnessing the potential of the medium.
As a technology developer, probably the most useful contribution I can make is to develop the infrastructure of the medium, and tools for working with it.
www.htmlhelp.com /~nick   (743 words)

  
 PCWorld.com - Back Up or Kiss Your Data Goodbye   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
In a home office there's no Dilbertian MIS department to nag you to back up or to ignore your pleas when a hard drive crashes.
It's what you feel when your hard drive converts four years' worth of Quicken data into cross-linked files--and you don't have a backup.
On the other hand, it also means no one's nagging me to back up.
www.pcworld.com /hereshow/article.asp?aid=36210   (389 words)

  
 Looking for a few good ideas - Dilbertian Convictions
We've exchanged emails with our new boss, and although everything is pretty much still up in the air, he sounds like an ok guy who will be able to appreciate the value of the work we've been doing, and probably won't split the team up.
In a phenomenal gesture of Dilbertian conviction, the CEO of the company has issued a directive that loosely translates to, "We've had no luck selling our microwave ovens because neither of the two the smart analyst people I've spoken to understand what they are.
Evidently my vision was wrong, so we're now going to start selling our product as personal safes."
www.spacefold.com /colin/posts/2000/08-31DilbertianConviction.html   (190 words)

  
 David Pogue and Andrea Butter, Piloting Palm
There's much more to the story of how the world's first truly usable PDA was born, and that story teaches much more than technology.
It teaches about putting wheels under dreams, and making visions into realities against an almost Dilbertian universe.
This and other fascinating tidbits from the history of Palm and Handspring can be found in this remarkable book which tells the inside story of the two start-ups.
www.pmn.co.uk /mobile/20030324pilot.shtml   (2283 words)

  
 Riding Sun The perfect blog to read at work
Scott Adams, creator of the Dilbert comic strip, has had a presence on the Internet for years and years — but now he's launched a blog.
On his original site, explaining his decision, he offers some Dilbertian insight into the blogging process:
When I see news stories about people all over the world who are experiencing hardships, I worry about them, and I rack my brain wondering how I can make a difference.
www.ridingsun.com /posts/1130583449.shtml   (367 words)

  
 Full Circle Online Interaction Blog: 12/01/2004 - 12/31/2004   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
We can't quite communicate what our world is like and how much we need them -- whoever they are -- to do what we need them to do.
In this sense, accusations about others' lack of accountability is often code for a Dilbertian world of silos, shut down communications, and self-protection -- characteristics of what I would call the background 'default' culture of American business and government organizations.
The answer, it seems to me, is in the relationships, the willingness in the hearts of people to try to understand the dynamics of how we are viewing each other and what that's doing to us -- all of us.
www.fullcirc.com /weblog/onfacarchives/2004_12_01_onfacarchive.htm   (8591 words)

  
 A Naming Language
You can quickly generate more than one language by inventing different sound change rules for each language.
So perhaps the Dilbertian [d] becomes [t] in Dogbertian, whereas it becomes [th] in Dinobertian.
Or take a look at how the names James, John and Katherine have evolved in seven different languages:
www.langmaker.com /ml0102.htm   (5077 words)

  
 Signum sine tinnitu--by Guy Kawasaki
First, it provides a fresh perspective that will help you understand success stories like Amazon, Google, Lego, RealNetworks, Netflix, and iTunes.
Second, it provides a framework that will help you more fully grasp the Dilbertian cluelessness of some companies in businesses like books, music, and movies.
Third, it may even help you create new companies and businesses that change the world.
blog.guykawasaki.com   (6825 words)

Try your search on: Qwika (all wikis)

Factbites
  About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   Press   |   Contact us  
Copyright © 2005-2007 www.factbites.com Usage implies agreement with terms.