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Topic: Dinosauria


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In the News (Fri 24 May 19)

  
  The Dinosauria, Second Edition
"The Dinosauria (second edition) is a summary and interpretation of the current state of knowledge in dinosaur science.
A state-of-the-science view of current world research, the volume includes comprehensive coverage of dinosaur systematics, reproduction, and life history strategies, biogeography, taphonomy, paleoecology, thermoregulation, and extinction.
The first section of The Dinosauria begins with the origin of the great clade of these fascinating reptiles, followed by separate coverage of each major dinosaur taxon, including the Mesozoic radiation of birds.
www.ucpress.edu /books/pages/2601001.html   (488 words)

  
  Pyrenees Discovery : SIGHT-SEEING - PREHISTORY ITINERARY - Dinosauria
Dinosauria will take you back 70 million years...
Every year, the palaeontologists of Dinosauria extract their eggs and skeletons from rocks in the Espéraza region.
Patiently chipped out of the rock, these bones are studied and repaired in the research laboratory, a job that the general public can observe through a large glass window.
www.pyrenees-decouvertes.com /en/visites/prehist/dinosauria/index.php   (160 words)

  
 On the Classification of the Dinosauria (1870)
On the Classification of the Dinosauria with Observations on the Dinosauria of the Trias
But I doubt if the majority of the Dinosauria stood more habitually upon their hind limbs than Kangaroos or Jerboas do; and unless there was some genetic connexion between the two, I see no reason why the hind limbs of 0rnithoscelida should resemble those of birds more than they resemble those of kangaroos.
Dinosauria from the Trias of the Ural Mountains and India.
aleph0.clarku.edu /huxley/SM3/ClDino.html   (7636 words)

  
 GEOL 104 The FORMAL Definition of Dinosauria   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-13)
Dinosauria = all descendants of the concestor (most recent common ancestor) of Iguanodon and Megalosaurus.
However, this is NOT the formal definition of Dinosauria in the scientific literature.
Dinosauria = all descendants of the concestor of Triceratops and modern birds (Aves of Gauthier; Neornithes of other authors).
www.geol.umd.edu /~tholtz/G104/dinodef.htm   (334 words)

  
 [No title]
The Dinosauria (second edition) is the long-awaited update of the 1990 volume of the same name (Weishampel et al.
The Dinosauria (second edition) is a summary and interpretation of the current state of knowledge in dinosaur science, and as such does not (and should not) attempt to amass the vast amounts of primary data on which the science is founded.
The chapter entitled “Mesozoic Biogeography of Dinosauria” (Holtz, Chapman, and Lamanna) is less a synthesis than a study of its own, and the only non-systematic chapter to present original analyses accompanied by original data.
www.nhm.ac.uk /hosted_sites/pe/2005_2/books/dino.htm   (2653 words)

  
 ISGS: Can you give me the authors and dates of publication for the listed taxa?
Many of the terms you give are probably out of date and hence the change listed in "The Dinosauria" so you also need to update your own taxa list to use current spellings and namings.
If you don't have The Dinosauria you can get a paperback copy from around $40 and it is a must if you are going to have your work up to date.
Dinosauria says the genus is by Nopcsa, 1928.
www.isgs.uiuc.edu /faq/dino-faqs/pdq112.html   (249 words)

  
 What is a dinosaur?
When Richard Owen first named the Dinosauria in 1842, based on the genera Iguanodon, Megalosaurus and Hylaeosaurus, he defined them as a group of large, extinct reptiles characterised by various anatomical features, primarily a fused sacrum: that is, the five or six vertebrae in the hip region are fused together.
Owen's definition was fine when only a few dinosaurian genera were known, but as more and more dinosaurs and related animals were discovered, it because apparent that this was not sufficiently rigorous to allow animals to be classified as dinosaurian or not.
The Dinosauria were defined cladistically by Padian and May in 1993 as the most recent common ancestor of Passer (the sparrow) and Triceratops, together with all its descendants; or, more tersely, as {Passer + Triceratops}.
www.miketaylor.org.uk /dino/faq/s-class/whatis/index.html   (1158 words)

  
 Dinosauria
Dinosauria is the scientific classification kingdom name for dinosaurs.
I did this project at school in an architecture studio called "the Road Studio." In this studio we studied the aesthetic of the American road and how it influenced architecture.
Dinosauria is an imaginary project, but allowed me to get really creative.
home.fuse.net /kinnewihl/Themed/Dinosauria.htm   (158 words)

  
 BHI/Fossils & Minerals/Dinosaurs and Birds
The term Dinosauria refers to a nearly extinct group of vertebrates.
This group arose from the reptiles in the late Middle Triassic Period and flourished from 240 to 65 million years ago during the Mesozoic Era.
It is useful to divide Dinosauria into three groups: theropods, sauropods and ornithischians.
www.bhigr.com /pages/info/info_dino.htm   (758 words)

  
 Dinosaur - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The taxon Dinosauria was formally named by the English palaeontologist Richard Owen in 1842 as "a distinct tribe or suborder of Saurian reptiles".
Although some later groups of dinosaurs featured further modified versions of these traits, they are considered typical across Dinosauria; the earliest dinosaurs had them and passed them on to all their descendants.
It has also been suggested that Dinosauria be defined as all the descendants of the most recent common ancestor of Megalosaurus and Iguanodon, because these were two of the three genera cited by Richard Owen when he recognized the Dinosauria.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Dinosauria   (7069 words)

  
 Lec 6 Origin of Dinosauria
J. Boneparte, an Argentinean paleontologist, also met great resistance when in 1976 he suggested that the Dinosauria was a monophyletic clade.
Dinosauromorpha share several derived characters: a sigmoidal vertebral column in the neck region, shortening of the forelimbs, and modifications of the ankle bones and metatarsals (Fastovsky and Weishampel, 1996).
However, after the approximately 160 million year reign of the dinosaurs, the mammals took over when the dinosaurs "bit the dust" at the end of the Cretaceous Period (about 65 million years ago).
www.wvup.edu /ecrisp/lecoriginofdinosauria.html   (1454 words)

  
 Triassic Dinosauria
Plieninyer, Some years ago, are also unquestionable Dinosauria; and, as Von Meyer is of opinion, probably belong to the genus Teratosaurus, from the same beds.
Further, the determination of the Thecodonts as Dinosauria, leaves hardly any doubt that the little Ankistrodon from these Indian rocks, long since described by me, belongs to the same group.
I hope, shortly, to have the honour of placing the details of the researches into the structure and distribution of the Dinosauria, in which I have been engaged for the last two years, and of which the above notice is one of the results, before the Geological Society.
www.nature.com /nature/first/triassic.html   (424 words)

  
 The Dinosauria
Recently in an attempt to acquire the much referred to book, The Dinosauria, I went to the local book shop and tried to order it.
They had it but it appears that their are two books with almost the same name and by the same author.
The second was The Dinosauria in Paleobiology, copywrite 1990 for $90.00.
dml.cmnh.org /1996Mar/msg00266.html   (135 words)

  
 Palaeos Vertebrates: 310.100  Dinosauromorpha
Lec 6 Origin of Dinosauria has a bit of both, but focuses on the Dinosauria, rather than their ancestors.
Wat is een dino I (moeilijk) is a Dutch translation of an article I wrote a number of years ago focusing on mechanics.
Phylogeny: Dinosauria: Ornithischia + *: Sauropodomorpha + Theropoda.
www.palaeos.com /Vertebrates/Units/Unit310/100.html   (1242 words)

  
 Amazon.ca: Dinosauria: Books: Weishampel   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-13)
by Weishampel (Author) "The Dinosauria form a well-defined group within the Archosauria and, with birds included within Dinosauria (as they must be on cladistic grounds), the group is..." (more)
The first section of The Dinosauria begins with the origin of the great clade of these fascinating reptiles, followed by separate coverage of each major dinosaur taxon, including the Mesozoic radiation of birds.
The Dinosauria form a well-defined group within the Archosauria and, with birds included within Dinosauria (as they must be on cladistic grounds), the group is clearly one of great significance among terrestrial vertebrates. Read the first page
www.amazon.ca /Dinosauria-Weishampel/dp/0520242092   (542 words)

  
 Dinosauria   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-13)
Over the eons, both groups have experimented with carnivory, omnivory, and herbivory, but it is still safe to say that many saurischians are predators while many ornithischians eat plants.
The sauropods, an ancient group of huge, long-necked saurischian plant-eaters, are still present in the warm parts of the Old World, although they are much reduced, and the abelisauroid predators roam the same areas in pretty high diversity.
The most successful maniraptoran clade, the birds, has strayed so far from its ancestors that Linnaean taxonomy has taken it out of Dinosauria and given it a class of its own, on par with mammals, "reptiles", and amphibians.
www.unet.univie.ac.at /~a0000265/Dinosauria.html   (1040 words)

  
 Dinosauria
For some 150 million years they dominated ever medium to large to gigantic terrestrial vertebrate ecological niche, evolving into a wide range of forms and populating every continent.
It has also for some years been suggested that they are ancestral to the Pterodactyls (flying reptiles), in which case one could follow Dr Bob Bakker in including the Pterosaurs under the Dinosauria (as a fifth linnean order).
One option might be to consider the Birds as a superorder of Archosaurs alongside the paraphyletic Superorder Dinosauria.
www.kheper.net /evolution/dinosauria/Dinosauria.htm   (1841 words)

  
 [No title]
Below are some summary definitions/descriptions to help with this gathered from a web search that offer other ways of thinking about this and may be helpful to you.
1.The Dinosauria were defined cladistically by Padian and May in 1993 as the most recent common ancestor of Passer (the sparrow) and Triceratops, together with all its descendants; or, more tersely, as {Passer + Triceratops}.
Preferred phylogenetic taxonomic definition for Dinosauria, namely: Dinosauria = all descendants of the most recent common ancestor of Iguanodon and Megalosaurus.
mason.gmu.edu /~gbirchar/Dinobiol/dinochar.htm   (1013 words)

  
 The Dinosauria
Dinosaurs, one of the most successful groups of animals (in terms of longevity) that have ever lived, evolved into many diverse sizes and shapes, with many equally diverse modes of living.
The term "Dinosauria" was invented by Sir Richard Owen in 1842 to describe these "fearfully great reptiles," specifically Megalosaurus, Iguanodon, and Hylaeosaurus, the only three dinosaurs known at the time.
The creatures that we normally think of as dinosaurs lived during the Mesozoic Era, from late in the Triassic period (about 225 million years ago) until the end of the Cretaceous (about 65 million years ago).
www.ucmp.berkeley.edu /diapsids/dinosaur.html   (487 words)

  
 Amazon.com: The Dinosauria: Books: David B. Weishampel,Peter Dodson,Halszka Osmólska,Halszka Osmolska   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-13)
The Dinosauria form a well-defined group within the Archosauria and, with birds included within Dinosauria (as they must be on cladistic grounds), the group is clearly one of great significance among terrestrial vertebrates.
I found "The Dinosauria" to be very well-written and very informative and it gives the reader a clue to the nature of dinosaurs through their bone structure.
The Dinosauria layed the foundation for works that would follow, and again this is the perfect introduction for someone who wants to get more serious about the real science of the Dinosauria.
www.amazon.com /Dinosauria-David-B-Weishampel/dp/0520067266   (1888 words)

  
 Ankylosaurid (Dinosauria: Thyreophora) osteoderms from the Upper Cretaceous Cerro del Pueblo Formation of Coahuila, ...
Ankylosaurid (Dinosauria: Thyreophora) osteoderms from the Upper Cretaceous Cerro del Pueblo Formation of Coahuila, Mexico
Vickaryous M.K., Russell A.P. Currie P.J.).- Cranial ornamentation of ankylosaurs (Dinosauria: Thyreophora): Reapraisal of developmental hypotheses.
Figure 1: Map showing the location of the area of study, in the southeastern region of the State of Cohauila, Mexico.
paleopolis.rediris.es /cg/CG2006_L02   (2031 words)

  
 The Reptipage: Dinosaurs
From their huge size to their astounding diversity, the dinosauria was a extremely intriguing branch of reptilian diversity.
All the members of the dinosauria are grouped under the superorder or subclass depending on your preference DINOSAURIA.
The classification of the dinosauria is a very confusing thing.
reptilis.net /dinosauria/overview.html   (1148 words)

  
 .:Dinosauria:.   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-13)
Penso que uma das coisas mais importantes sobre Dinosauria, que todos os interessados neste grupo deveriam saber, é seu cladograma.
Por isso, apresento apenas links para páginas que disponibilizam cladogramas do grupo Dinosauria muito completos e extremamente atualizados.
O link mostrado aqui aponta diretamente para o grupo Dinosauria.
www.dinosauriaong.hpg.ig.com.br /dino/pclad.htm   (473 words)

  
 The Dinosauria   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-13)
Dinosaurs were and are quite diverse, and often one person will think of an animal like a long-necked sauropod, while another person will think of a large, fierce meat-eater like Tyrannosaurus rex.
It should be clear then that the term "dinosaurs", or the scientific version "Dinosauria", is describing a diverse group of animals with widely different modes of living.
The term was invented by Sir Richard Owen in 1842 to describe these "fearfully great reptiles", specifically Megalosaurus, Iguanodon, and Hylaeosaurus, the only three dinosaurs known at the time.
www.millville.org /Workshops_f/Hoff_Dino_Hunt/whacked/dinosaur.html   (724 words)

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