Factbites
 Where results make sense
About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   PR   |   Contact us  

Topic: Dio Chrysostom


Related Topics

In the News (Wed 19 Jun 19)

  
  Dio Chrysostom - LoveToKnow 1911
He was called Chrysostom ("golden-mouthed") from his eloquence, and also to distinguish him from his grandson, the historian Dio Cassius; his surname Cocceianus was derived from his patron, the emperor Cocceius Nerva.
Amongst his lost works were attacks on philosophers and Domitian, and Getica (wrongly attributed to Dio Cassius by Suidas), an account of the manners and customs of the Getae, for which he had collected material on the spot during his banishment.
The style of Dio, who took Plato and Xenophon especially as his models, is pure and refined, and on the whole free from rhetorical exaggeration.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /Dio_Chrysostom   (518 words)

  
 APA Abstract
Dio consistently calls on his audience to be "Hellenic," but this does not mean simply being more like the inhabitants of fifth-century Athens.
In all of these instances, taking Dio's side is portrayed as choosing to be part of a broad cosmopolitan Greek identity that is opposed to the parochialism and pettiness with which Dio taints his opponents.
Dio's reaction to Rome is not to exclude it, but to include it on distinctly Hellenic terms as opposed to customary Roman stereotypes.
www.apaclassics.org /AnnualMeeting/05mtg/abstracts/Kemezis.html   (532 words)

  
 Dio Chrysostom
Dio or Dio Chrysostom (c 40 AD - c 120 AD) was a Greek orator, writer, philosopher and historian of the Romans in the first century.
In his later life Dio returned to Prusa, where he apparently had some status, as there are records of him being involved in an uban renewal lawsuit about 111 AD.
He should not be confused with his grandson Dio Cassius, who was also a historian of the romans.
www.gamesinathens.com /olympics/d/di/dio_chrysostom.shtml   (457 words)

  
 Plutarch's Pyrrhus and Euripides' Phoenician Women
[2] It is no surprise, then, that Dio Chrysostom, Plutarch's contemporary in the emerging world of "the second sophistic", uses a quotation from the play as the centrepiece of a moral argument of his own, on the evils of pleonexia.
Dio stresses that, in his view, Jocasta's speech is a fine formulation of the problems of pleonexia.
Dio Chrysostom's discussion of pleonexia tends to suggest that Plutarch was doing nothing very surprising in bringing the Phoenician Women to bear on a case of pleonexia, while pleonexia was so familiar an issue that Dio offers an apology for producing an oration on the theme.
www.dur.ac.uk /Classics/histos/1997/braund.html   (6825 words)

  
  Dio Chrysostom Biography / Profile
Dio Cocceianus, trained in rhetoric, was given the name “Chrysostom” (DI-oh krihs-OHS-tuhm; golden-mouthed) and won fame throughout the Roman Empire because of his eloquence in speech and writings.
Dio arrived in Rome a Sophist opposed to many of the philosophers.
Dio’s writings, along with those of the philosopher Plutarch, are part of a brief revival of Greek writings in the second century c.e.
www.enotes.com /salem-lit/dio-chrysostom   (217 words)

  
 Dio Chrysostom - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography   (Site not responding. Last check: )
After Domitian was assassinated in 96 AD, Dio reputedly talked an encampment of Roman troops out of a mutiny and persuaded them to accept the will of the Roman people.
In his later life Dio returned to Prusa, where he apparently had some status, as there are records of him being involved in an urban renewal lawsuit about 111 AD.
Dio Chrysostom should not be confused with his grandson Dio Cassius, who was also a historian of the Romans, nor with the fourth-century bishop John Chrysostom of Antioch.
www.arikah.com /encyclopedia/Dio_Chrysostom   (666 words)

  
 Dio Cassius
Dio Cassius Cocceianus (AD 155 - after 229), was the son of Cassius Apronianus[?], a Roman senator, and born at Nicaea in Bithynia.
Dio published a Roman history, in eighty books, the fruit of his researches and labours of twenty-two years.
Dio has taken Thucydides for his model, but the imitator is not comparable with his original either in arrangement and the distribution of materials or in soundness of view and accurate reasoning.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/di/Dio_Cassius.html   (734 words)

  
 Spartanburg SC | GoUpstate.com | Spartanburg Herald-Journal
Dio published a Roman history embracing a period of 983 years, from the arrival of Aeneas in Italy through the subsequent founding of Rome and then to 229.
Cassius Dio was the son of Cassius Apronianus, a Roman Senator.
Cassius Dio's mother, was the daughter of Greek historian, orator, and philosopher Dio Chrysostom.
www.goupstate.com /apps/pbcs.dll/section?category=NEWS&template=wiki&text=Dio_Cassius   (805 words)

  
 Dio Chrysostom
Dio or Dio Chrysostom (c 40 AD - c 120 AD) was a Greek orator, writer, philosopher and historian of the Romans in the first century.
In his later life Dio returned to Prusa, where he apparently had some status, as there are records of him being involved in an uban renewal lawsuit about 111 AD.
He should not be confused with his grandson Dio Cassius, who was also a historian of the romans.
www.teachersparadise.com /ency/en/wikipedia/d/di/dio_chrysostom.html   (478 words)

  
 The Dispatch - Serving the Lexington, NC - News   (Site not responding. Last check: )
After Domitian was assassinated in 96, Dio reputedly talked an encampment of Roman troops out of a mutiny and persuaded them to accept the will of the Roman people.
In his later life Dio returned to Prusa, where he apparently had some status, as there are records of him being involved in an urban renewal lawsuit about 111.
Dio Chrysostom should not be confused with Cassius Dio, who was also a historian of the Romans, nor with the fourth-century bishop John Chrysostom of Antioch.
www.the-dispatch.com /apps/pbcs.dll/section?category=NEWS&template=wiki&text=Dio_Chrysostom   (505 words)

  
 Cassius Dio Cocceianus   (Site not responding. Last check: )
His grandfather was the orator Dio Chrysostom, and his father was Cassius Apronianus, governor of Dalmatia and Cilicia under Marcus Aurelius.
Dio Cassius appears to have remained in the East during, at least part of, the rule of Elagabalus (218-222), although, at some stage, he had been consul, and, under Alexander Severus (222-235), he became proconsul in Africa.
Dio Cassius had felt it necessary to be a firm disciplinarian with his troops in Pannonia, and, as a result, the Praetorian Guard were unhappy about his appointment.
www.stephen.j.murray.btinternet.co.uk /dio.htm   (560 words)

  
 DIO COCCEIANUS   (Site not responding. Last check: )
DIO COCCEIANUS, surnamed Chrysostom (golden-mouthed), a travling scholar who in his 36th Oration (known as the "Borysthenian" or "Olbian" from its dramatic setting), written about 100 C.E., purports to summarize a hymn composed by Zoroaster and sung by the magi "in secret rites" (text and commentary in Bidez and Cumont, II, pp.
Greek authors had no inhibitions about enhancing their own material by attributing it to oriental sages, and the setting of the hymns as a myth at the end of a philosophical discourse is precisely the sort of literary context where, by convention, the freest rein could be given to imagination.
The problem is that there are no other extant remains of Magusaean liturgy or doctrine against which Dio's material might be tested, and in their default it is probably sounder to attribute to Dio himself that which is manifestly occidental and in the Greek philosophical tradition.
www.iranica.com /articles/v7/v7f4/v7f464.html   (494 words)

  
 BMCR-L: BMCR 2002.04.06 Swain (ed.), Dio Chrysostom: politics, letters,
Salmeri's chapter on 'Dio, Rome, and the civic life of Asia Minor' adds only detail (rich though that is) to the argument of his book (which is frequently 'cf-ed')[[6]]: Dio is primarily concerned with promoting civic harmony; his self-arrogated role in Greco-Roman relations was to mediate and accommodate.
Dio Chrysostom, Orations 7, 12, 36 (Cambridge, 1992); Moles, J.L. 'The Kingship Orations of Dio Chrysostom', Papers of the Leeds Latin Seminar 6 (1990), 297-375.
Moles, J.L. 'Dio Chrysostom, Greece, and Rome', in Innes, D., Hine, H and Pelling, C. eds Ethics and rhetoric: classical essays for Donald Russell on his seventy-fifth birthday (Oxford, 1995), 177-92; Trapp, M.B. 'Sense of place in the orations of Dio Chrysostom', in Innes et al.
omega.cohums.ohio-state.edu /mailing_lists/BMCR-L/2002/0097.php   (2422 words)

  
 Dio Chrysostom - Hutchinson encyclopedia article about Dio Chrysostom   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Greek sophist and rhetorician, maternal grandfather of Dio Cassius, born at Prusa in Bithynia.
Eighty ‘speeches’ attributed to Dio Chrysostom have survived; they are really essays on political, moral, and philosophical subjects.
This information should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional.
encyclopedia.farlex.com /Dio+Chrysostom   (107 words)

  
 Rome Under Better Emperors 96-180 by Sanderson Beck
In 82 Dio was banished by Domitian from Rome, Italy, and Bithynia for advising a conspiring relative of the Emperor.
Dio believed that guardian spirits are good and that the wise are fortunate and happy because they are guided by them; but the unhappy are so, not because their guardian spirit is bad, but because they neglect the good spirit.
Dio is like the physician who touches the sore spot; he makes it smart, but his medicine is mild considering the seriousness of their case.
www.san.beck.org /AB8-Rome96-180.html   (22514 words)

  
 Bryn Mawr Classical Review 2003.06.12
Dio treats the subject in a rather non-philosophical manner, happy to interest his public with historical reminiscences.
Dio does not follow a systematic interpretation of Homer but adapts the poet to the needs of his speeches.
Dio's picture of the cities' poverty, quest for pleasure in connection with the arts, and decline of morality, is then analysed in contrast with the freedom and happiness of the Euboean countrymen, who constitute an ideal community.
ccat.sas.upenn.edu /bmcr/2003/2003-06-12.html   (1367 words)

  
 Michel Foucault, Parrhesiasts - Diogenes, The Cynic Philosophers and their techniques
Dio's family was typical of the affluent provincial notables that produced so many writers, officers, generals, even emperors, for the Roman Empire.
But we must keep in mind the fact that Dio Chrysostom was not a "pure" cynic; and perhaps with his intellectual background his depiction of the Cynic parrhesiastic game puts it closer to the Socratic tradition than most of the actual Cynic practices.
In this text by Dio Chrysostom, Diogenes begins a continuous discourse; however his discussion does not present the truth of a positive thesis, but is content to give a precise description of three faulty modes of life linked to the royal character.
foucault.info /documents/parrhesiasts/foucault.diogenes.en.html   (4804 words)

  
 Dio Chrysostom - Definition, explanation
Dio or Dio Chrysostom (c 40 AD - c 120 AD) was a Greek orator, writer, philosopher and historian of the Roman Empire in the first century.
Under Emperor Nerva's reign, his exile was ended and he adopted the surname Cocceianus in later life to honour the support given to him by the emperor, whose full name was Marcus Cocceius Nerva.
In his later life Dio returned to Prusa, where he apparently had some status, as there are records of him being involved in an urban renewal lawsuit about 111 AD.
www.calsky.com /lexikon/en/txt/d/di/dio_chrysostom.php   (492 words)

  
 Kim: Unspeakable Sounds: Dio Chrysostom on Nasal Noise at Tarsus
Of course, as Cécile Bost-Pouderon has pointed out recently, Dio’s speech authorizes all of these readings to some degree, because he does touch on all of these areas in his digressive and somewhat self-contradictory treatment of this elusive ‘snorting’; to fixate on only one ‘meaning’ is to ignore other equally significant portions of the text.
The answers have been so varied because Dio himself never defines what he means by rhengkein, and only mentions the word once (despite the impression given by translators who feel compelled to supply it for clarity).
In the paper, I suggest that Dio seems to be thematizing the difficulty, or even impossibility, of adequately defining his subject matter, which, although capable of being heard, is rendered indescribable by speech.
www.camws.org /meeting/2004/abstracts2004/kim.html   (341 words)

  
 Dio Chrysostom . Bursa . Rome . Melankomas . 96 . John Chrysostom   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Dio or Dio Chrysostom c 40 AD - c 120 AD was a Greece Greek orator, writer, philosopher and historian of the Romans in the first century.
Bursa formerly known as Brusa or Prusa is the capital of the Bursa Province in northwestern Turkey.
Chrysostom wrote of the Jews and of Judaizers in eight homilies Adversus Judaeos against the Judaizers...
www.uk.fraquisanto.net /Dio_Chrysostom   (544 words)

  
 Dio Chrysostom - definition erklärung bedeutung glossar zu Dio Chrysostom   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Dio Chrysostom(os), auch Dio Cocceianus (* nach 40, † vor 120) war ein griechischer Redner, Schriftsteller und Philosoph im 1.
Unter der Regierung von Kaiser Marcus Cocceius Nerva wurde sein Exil beendet, was ihn dazu brachte, den Beinamen Cocceianus anzunehmen.
*Dio Chrysostom Eintrag aus der Columbia Encyclopedia, 6.
www.adlexikon.de /Dio_Chrysostom.shtml   (522 words)

  
 Dio Cassius - HighBeam Encyclopedia
Dio Cassius (Cassius Dio Cocceianus), c.155-235?, Roman historian and administrator, b.
His great work, partially extant, was a history of Rome (written in Greek) from the earliest times until Dio Cassius' own period.
They are a reputable source for the period of the later republic and the first two centuries AD Dio Cassius tried earnestly to study all available sources in the light of a moderate skepticism.
www.encyclopedia.com /doc/1E1-DioCassi.html   (589 words)

  
 [No title]
The Xenophon meant down below is the author of the Ephesiaca, not the disciple of Socrates who wrote the Anabasis and the Hellenica.
Chariton and Longus wrote ancient novels, while Dio Chrysostom is of quite another ilk.
He believes that one should read Daphnis and Chloe, The Hunters of Euobea, Chaereas and Callhiroe, and The Ephesian Tale if one is to understand many of the social, legal, literary and philosophical conventions in the NT.
www.ibiblio.org /bgreek/test-archives/html4/att-11102/00-part   (383 words)

  
 LacusCurtius • Dio Chrysostom — In Praise of Hair
His interest in Dio Chrysostom is attested, not only by his Encomium on Baldness, but also by reminiscences of Dio in a speech delivered at Constantinople about the year 400 and by his Dio, composed about five years later, a considerable portion of which will be found on pages 365‑387.
Synesius' Encomium on Baldness: Dio of the golden tongue has composed a discourse entitled An Encomium on Hair, which is a work of such brilliance that the inevitable result of the speech is to make a bald man feel ashamed.
Nay, even in his struggle with the Hydra, though for a time they were locked in single combat, yet when the crab came to her aid Heracles might even have cried quits, had he not enlisted Iolaüs against them as ally.
penelope.uchicago.edu /Thayer/E/Roman/Texts/Dio_Chrysostom/Encomium_on_Hair*.html   (1405 words)

  
 Detail Page
Also called Dio Chrysostom and Dio of Prusa, the "golden mouthed" philosopher and writer.
Dio owned vineyards and land and fought to improve conditions in Prusa.
Some of these were comical, especially the First Oration in Tarsus, but many stood as biting attacks on the era, such as his oratory on the nature of god.
www.fofweb.com /Onfiles/Ancient/AncientDetail.asp?iPin=ROME0515   (245 words)

  
 Amazon.co.jp: chrysostom: 洋書   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Dio Chrysostom, Orations Vii, Xii, and Xxxvi (Cambridge Greek and Latin Classics) D. Russell (ハードカバー - 1992/10/8)
Dio Chrysostom (Lcl, 257) J. Cohoon (ハードカバー - 1932/6)
Dio Chrysostom: Discourses 12-30 (Lcl, 339) J. Cohoon (ハードカバー - 1939/6)
www.amazon.co.jp /s?ie=UTF8&keywords=chrysostom&tag=159250-22&index=books-us&pg=4&page=1   (271 words)

  
 Mark 15: Cultural Intertexture
A short span of text in Dio Chrysostom exhibits an intriguing aspect of cultural intertexture.
The irony, from the perspective of Mediterranean cultural logic, is that those things which are done to Jesus are the things "customarily" done to the one whom an official "releases to the people" at the time of their festival.
It is a remarkable symptom of the crosscultural manifestation of actions and configurations in the Markan account that the sequence of scenes in Mark 15 follow the sequence of the Dio Chrysostom text, and this produces a reversal of the order of scenes in Psalm 22.
www.religion.emory.edu /faculty/robbins/SRI/Examples/texts/mark/mark16.html   (564 words)

Try your search on: Qwika (all wikis)

Factbites
  About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   Press   |   Contact us  
Copyright © 2005-2007 www.factbites.com Usage implies agreement with terms.