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Topic: Diodorus Siculus


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  Diodorus Siculus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The latest event Diodorus mentions is Octavian's vengeance on the city of Tauromenium, whose refusal to help him led to Octavian's naval defeat nearby in 36 BC (16.7).
Diodorus asserts that he devoted thirty years to the composition of his history, and that he undertook a number of dangerous journeys through Europe and Asia in prosecution of his historical researches.
Diodorus offers the only chronological survey of the period of Philip, and supplements the writers mentioned and contemporary sources in many matters.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Diodorus_Siculus   (900 words)

  
 NationMaster.com - Encyclopedia: Diodorus Siculus   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
This liberal use of earlier historians underlies the harsh opinion of the author of the 1911 Encyclop√¶dia Britannica article on Diodorus: Supporters contend that the Eleventh Edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica (1910-1911) represents the sum of human knowledge at the beginning of the 20th century; indeed, it was advertised as such.
Diodorus offers the only chronological survey of the period of Philip (Englishman and husband of Elizabeth II (born 1921)), and supplements the writers mentioned and contemporary sources in many matters.
The editio princeps of Diodorus was a Latin (Any dialect of the language of ancient Rome) translation of the first five books by Poggio Bracciolini (additional info and facts about Poggio Bracciolini) at Bologna (Large smooth-textured smoked sausage of beef and veal and pork) in 1472.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Diodorus-Siculus   (2412 words)

  
 Diodorus Siculus   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Diodorus Siculus, Greek historian, born at Agyrium in Sicily (now called Agira, in the province of Enna), lived in the times of Julius Caesar and Augustus.
Diodorus Siculus Describes Diodorus' treatment of Atlantis and the Amazons in his Historical Library.
Diodorus Siculus on Isis From the Oldfather translation of the Library, I.13-27.
www.serebella.com /encyclopedia/article-Diodorus_Siculus.html   (1065 words)

  
 DIODORUS SICULUS - LoveToKnow Article on DIODORUS SICULUS   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The first treats of the mythic history of the nonHellenic, and afterwards of the Hellenic tribes, to the destruction of Troy; the second section ends with Alexanders death; and the third continues the history as far as the beginning of Caesars Gallic War.
In spite of its defects, however, the Bibliotheca is of considerable value as to some extent supplying the loss of the works of older authors, from which it is compiled.
Unfortunately, Diodorus does not always quote his authorities, but his general sources of information werein history and chronology, Castor, Ephorus and Apollodorus; in geography, Agatharchides and Artemidorus.
12.1911encyclopedia.org /D/DI/DIODORUS_SICULUS.htm   (466 words)

  
 Diodorus Siculus   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The first treats of the mythic history of the non-Hellenic, andafterwards of the Hellenic tribes, to the destruction of Troy ; the second section ends with Alexander 's death; and the third continues the history as faras the beginning of Caesar's Gallic War.
The faults of Diodorus arise partly from the nature of the undertaking, and the awkward form of annals into which he hasthrown the historical portion of his narrative.
Unfortunately, Diodorus does not always quote his authorities, but his generalsources of information were in history and chronology, Castor, Ephorus and Apollodorus ; in geography, Agatharchides and Artemidorus.
www.therfcc.org /diodorus-siculus-85041.html   (287 words)

  
 History of Ethiopia According to Herodotus, Diodorus Siculus and Strabo   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Diodorus cites this reference as well as the ancient belief that Dionysus was the son of Ammon, king of Libya (3.68.1), and much of Book 3 of the Bibliotheka Historica [Library of History] is devoted to the intertwined histories of Dionysus and the god-favored Ethiopians whom he believed to be the originators of Egyptian civilization.
Diodorus devoted an entire chapter of his world history, the Bibliotheke Historica, or Library of History (Book 3), to the Kushites ["Aithiopians"] of Meroe.
Here he repeats the story of their great piety, their high favor with the gods, and adds the fascinating legend that they were the first of all men created by the gods and were the founders of Egyptian civilization, invented writing, and given the Egyptians their religion and culture.
www.homestead.com /wysinger/strabo.html   (1921 words)

  
 Diodorus Siculus - Best of Sicily Magazine
Even so, Diodorus Siculus (or Diodoros Siculos to his Greek contemporaries), left a wealth of writings which have added to our knowledge of Sicily and the eastern Mediterranean during the "Roman" age.
The problem, as we have implied, is that Diodorus does not always differentiate historical events from historical legend, even though some historians of his era managed to do so.
Diodorus remains the most famous Sicilian historian of the classical age.
www.bestofsicily.com /mag/art112.htm   (472 words)

  
 Diodorus Siculus   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The first of the mythic history of the non-Hellenic afterwards of the Hellenic tribes to the of Troy ; the second section ends with Alexander 's death; and the third continues the as far as the beginning of Caesar's Gallic War.
The faults of Diodorus arise partly from nature of the undertaking and the awkward of annals into which he has thrown historical portion of his narrative.
Diodorus does not always quote his authorities his general sources of information were in and chronology Castor Ephorus and Apollodorus ; in geography Agatharchides and Artemidorus.
www.freeglossary.com /Diodorus_Siculus   (512 words)

  
 Diodorus Siculus-Encyclopedia Entry
Diodorus provides our only continuous narrative of the history of 4th century Greece, including Book 16, which is devoted entirely to PHILIP II of Macedon.
Diodorus was not always successful at synchronizing the Roman calendar with the Athenian one, and his work suffers from the embarrassing lapses one would expect from such a vast, self-published encyclopedia.
Diodorus was summarized by PHOTIUS (Codex 70) whose praise is particularly effusive, complimenting Diodorus' clear and unaffected style as well as his historical acumen.Another index of Diodorus' later popularity is the note in SUDA that Diodorus lived past the reign of Augustus, which possibly indicates a post-mortem continuation of his work.
mywebpages.comcast.net /pythian/writings/diodorus.html   (1049 words)

  
 Diodorus Siculus   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
This liberal use of earlier historians underlies the harsh opinion of the author of the 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica article on Diodorus: :The faults of Diodorus arise partly from the nature of the undertaking, and the awkward form of annals into which he has thrown the historical portion of his narrative.
Far more sympathetic is the estimate of C.H. Oldfather, who wrote in the introduction to his translation of Diodorus: :While characteristics such as these exclude Diodorus from a place among the abler historians of the ancient world, there is every reason to believe that he used the best sources and that he reproduced them faithfully.
It was not until 1559 that all of the surviving books, and surviving fragments of books 21 to the end was published by H. Stephanus at Geneva.
diodorus-siculus.area51.ipupdater.com   (891 words)

  
 DIODORUS SICULUS   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
DIODORUS SICULUS, Greek historian from Agyrium in Sicily, hence called Siculus (the Sicilian).
The work is a compilation, normally epitomizing one earlier historian at a time, with insertions from Diodorus' other readings and moral reflections of his own, and changing over to another history where the previous one runs out.
This makes Diodorus' chronology difficult to use, even when (as is most often the case) it is by his own standards correct.
www.iranica.com /articles/v7/v7f4/v7f465.html   (390 words)

  
 Table of Contents and Excerpt, Green, Diodorus Siculus, Books 11-12.37.1
Unfortunately (as what follows should make amply clear), Diodorus, properly examined, turns out to be a rational, methodical, if somewhat unimaginative, minor historian, who planned on a large scale, and was quite capable of seeing major faults and inconsistencies provided he lived to correct them.
This means that all the historical problems in his text that have for long been side-stepped on the grounds that his evidence is that of a virtual mental defective, and thus can always be disregarded when inconvenient, are back on the table for discussion.
It was against this background that I began to translate Diodorus on the Persian Wars and the Pentekontaetia (Books 11-12.37), and then, as the rains eased off and a bedraggled spring emerged, on the reigns of Philip II and Alexander (Books 16-17).
www.utexas.edu /utpress/excerpts/exgredio.html   (1628 words)

  
 Barddas I: Preface: Diodorus Siculus
DIODORUS SICULUS, B.C. His description also is confined to the Druidism of Gaul, and is to the following effect:--
According to the declaration of Diodorus, the common people regarded the Druids as mediators between themselves and the gods, and grounded their competency and fitness for that purpose upon the fact that they were acquainted with the divine nature, and used the same language.
And since the acts of the Gorsedd in Britain were to be performed at all times in Cymraeg, we may reasonably infer that it was in the old Celtic tongue Druidism was administered on the Continent--there was not much difference between the Cymraeg and the native language of Gaul.
www.sacred-texts.com /neu/celt/bim1/bim1006.htm   (456 words)

  
 NATE Discussion Group - read a message   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
For those of you are familiar with Seamus Heaney's 'Strange Fruit', you'll know the section that says “Diodorus Siculus confessed / His gradual ease among the likes of this”.
That is that bit of text in which Diodorus Siculus "confessed his gradual ease among the likes of this".
Diodorus Siculus confessed that with each murder he became more desensitised.
www.teachit.co.uk /natediscuss/ShowMessage.asp?ID=1782   (212 words)

  
 Diodorus Siculus - Search Results - MSN Encarta
Diodorus Siculus - Search Results - MSN Encarta
Wrought-iron firedogs provide further evidence of the importance of feasting in Celtic society.
As Diodorus Siculus relates, the Gauls partook of...
uk.encarta.msn.com /Diodorus_Siculus.html   (107 words)

  
 Diodorus siculus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Start the Diodorus siculus article or add a request for it.
Look for Diodorus siculus in Wiktionary, our sister dictionary project.
Look for Diodorus siculus in the Commons, our repository for free images, music, sound, and video.
www.sciencedaily.com /encyclopedia/diodorus_siculus   (135 words)

  
 Diodorus Siculus - Hutchinson encyclopedia article about Diodorus Siculus   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
His Bibliotheca Historica consisted of 40 books in three sections: it covered the period from before the Trojan War to Julius Caesar's Gallic campaigns.
I then questioned the Mummy about burning-glasses and lenses, and, in general, about the manufacture of glass; but I had not made an end of my queries before the silent member again touched me quietly on the elbow, and begged me for God's sake to take a peep at Diodorus Siculus.
This information should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional.
encyclopedia.farlex.com /Diodorus%20Siculus   (197 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Stylianou, 'Diodorus Siculus and the First Century' URL = http://hegel.lib.ncsu.edu/stacks/serials/bmcr/bmcr-v2n06-stylianou-diodorus 2.6.19, Kenneth S.Sacks, Diodorus Siculus and the First Century.
Of the second category (chapters 2 and 3) five broad themes of historiography in the Bibliotheke are investigated: character assessments, the rise and fall of empires, the power of fortune, explanations of human progress, and the idea of universalism.
The final two chapters (5 and 6), bearing the respective titles of "Diodorus on Rome" and "Diodorus in the World of Caesar and Octavian," are meant to establish D.'s attitude toward Rome, and having done that to suggest that this attitude conditioned the structure as well as the moral bias of the Bibliotheke.
www.infomotions.com /serials/bmcr/bmcr-v2n06-stylianou-diodorus.txt   (3837 words)

  
 Diodorus Siculus - The daily routine of the pharaohs   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Diodorus Siculus - The daily routine of the pharaohs
The description Diodorus gives of the daily routine of the Egyptian kings is second or third hand knowledge.
It also has a strong flavour of utopianism: the excellent qualities of a far off and recently defunct administration are extolled.
nefertiti.iwebland.com /texts/pharaohslife.htm   (894 words)

  
 Diodorus Siculus on mining   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Diodorus Siculus, writing in the first century BCE, was born in Argyrion, Sicily.
His 40 volume history was a compilation of texts taken from various, sometimes suspect sources.
And repeating this a number of times, they first of all rub it gently with their hands, and then lightly pressing it with sponges of loose texture they remove...whatever is porous and earthy, until there remains only the pure gold-dust.
nefertiti.iwebland.com /timelines/topics/diodorus.htm   (345 words)

  
 Green, Diodorus Siculus, Books 11-12.37.1, University of Texas Press
The portion of Diodorus' history translated here covers the period 480-431 BCE, from the Persian invasion of Greece to the outbreak of the Peloponnesian War.
This half-century, known as the Pentekontaetia, was the Golden Age of Periclean Athens, a time of unprecedented achievement in drama, architecture, philosophy, historiography, and the visual arts.
In his masterful introductory essay, Green demolishes the traditional view of Diodorus and argues for a thorough critical reappraisal of this synthesizing historian, who attempted nothing less than a "universal history" that begins with the gods of mythology and continues down to the eve of Julius Caesar's Gallic campaigns.
www.utexas.edu /utpress/books/gredio.html   (288 words)

  
 The "Ethiopians" According to Diodorus Siculus   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Diodorus Siculus was a Sicilian Greek historian who lived from 90 to 21 BC.
He wrote, a world history in 40 books, ending it near the time of his death with Caesar’s Gallic Wars.
These, then, are the customs which prevail among the Ethiopians who dwell in their capital (Napata) and those who inhabit both the island of Meroe and the land adjoining Egypt.
wysinger.homestead.com /diodorus.html   (916 words)

  
 Sacks, K.S.: Diodorus Siculus and the First Century.   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Living in Rome during the last years of the Republic, Diodorus of Sicily produced the most expansive history of the ancient world that has survived from antiquity--the Bibliotheke.
Whereas Diodorus himself has been commonly seen as a "mere copyist" of earlier historical traditions, Kenneth Sacks explores the complexity of his work to reveal a historian with a distinct point of view indicative of his times.
In particular, his negative reaction to Roman imperial rule helps to illuminate the obscure tradition of opposition historiography and to explain the shape and structure of the Bibliotheke.
pup.princeton.edu /titles/4681.html   (176 words)

  
 Diodorus Siculus Vocabulary @ Fburg.com (F'burg)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Oldfather">C.H. Oldfather remarks on the "striking coincidence" that one of only two Greek inscriptions known to Diodorus from Agyrium (I.G. XIV, 588) is the tombstone of one "Diodorus, the son of Apollonius".
Oldfather">C.H. Oldfather, who wrote in the introduction to his translation of Diodorus:
"Diodorus Siculus" results in these other popular encyclopedia sites:
www.fburg.com /encyclopedia/Diodorus_Siculus   (867 words)

  
 Amazon.com: Diodorus Siculus (Library of History Ser. Books XVIII-XIX/No. L377): Books: Diodorus Siculus   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Diodorus a Greek historian who lived from 80-20 BCE wrote 40 books of world history.
In this volume from the Loeb Classical Library, Greek on one page, English on the other, Diodorus clearly and effectively tells us about one of the most dramatic periods of World History, the period following the death of Alexander when the vast, newly-conquered empire was fought over and carved up by his generals.
In the side margin of each page there is a date so that the chronology is always clear, and any omissions by Diodorus are effectively dealt with by excellent footnotes which provide cross-references with other historical sources.
www.amazon.com /exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0674994159?v=glance   (1295 words)

  
 Diodorus Siculus on Egyptian Medicine
But if they act counter to the regulations they are liable to mortal accusation, as the law giver was of the opinion that few would know more appropriate remedies than the procedures based on observations during many years and prescribed by the first masters of the art.
Diodorus Siculus lived from ca 90 to ca 30 BCE.
He was born in Sicily and composed the Historical Library which described the world known at his time.
www.reshafim.org.il /ad/egypt/texts/diodorus_on_medicine.htm   (282 words)

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